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Basic gear for high country cold weather elk hunting.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by H&Hhunter, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    DANG !!! Why haven't I ever thought of that? This what I love about THR, I just learned something, THANK YOU!
     
  2. Glenn.Myers

    Glenn.Myers Member

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    Great List

    This is a well thought out list. I've been here in Montana for the past 19 years and also spent several years in Alaska...Good job.

    Glenn
     
  3. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    welcome to THR, Glenn


    Greg, the gloves link in the OP is broken/expired. can you repost?

    I have been wearing kennetrek for long time and absolutely love them. i will definitely try the schnees!

    foam ear plug in the muzzle is a fantastic idea! thanks!
     
  4. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Taliv,

    Here is the glove but it looks like they are being discontinued.

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Clot...=SBC;MMcat104797080;cat104358780;cat104128380

    I went to Cabelas today and their replacement/upgrade appears to be a glove called the Pinnacle. And they are almost twice the price at $99.00 but they looked like seriously warm well designed gloves. I'll hang on to my old Dry Plus gloves until they die then will look real hard at the Pinnacle gloves.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014
  5. Robert

    Robert Moderator Staff Member

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    The Schnee Hunter IIs are awesome. With all the snow we've had mine have been getting some good usage.
     
  6. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Robert I've gotten 6 + years of hard winter use out if mine. They are still in great shape, warm and waterproof as ever. In fact I wore them all day today in -0 temps and my feet were toasty. I started the day off watering horses and hacking ice balls out of their feet, Schnees has my undying devotion as long as they don't change a thing about their hunting pack boots! They are the best serious hard winter condition hunting boots ever made.
     
  7. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    i ordered a set in january. they said 10 days to ship
     
  8. torqem

    torqem member

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    definitely need a packhorse to help haul all that stuff. Wow. If you wear glasses, bring a spare pair, and a strap to keep them on you. Especially when on horseback or on slippery slopes. They tend to break if you fall on your face, knock them off flailing for balance, etc. If you seriously need them and have no spare, there went your hunt, right there.
     
  9. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    schnees arrived yesterday. perfect fit.

    what does it normally take to break them in?
     
  10. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Mine were action ready the first time I put them on. No break in needed.
     
  11. hartcreek

    hartcreek member

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    Good list only differnce I do is is WWII shooters mittens instead of the gloves. It was 10 degrees F my late season and without the mittens my fingers would have been numb.
     
  12. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Spare glasses are a must. Thanks for the reminder.

    Also in regards to all that stuff. Remember this is a drive in/ride in base camp list. :)
     
  13. ASCTLC

    ASCTLC Member

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    Nice information H&H. When I first started elk hunting back in 2001 I carried a lot on me to make up for being overly cautious of trudging in the mountains. It's just I carried way too much of things I still carry when I started out. Served me well as I wouldn't have gotten far from the roads if I didn't think I had survival contingencies well covered. And not getting very far from the roads wouldn't have gotten me elk.

    Now, I've cut down an awful lot of weight to aid in mobility as we might put a good 7-10 miles a day in. We cover a lot of ground until we hit them. We hunt a lot of true wilderness areas that require leg power to access. It's just the way my partner and I like to hunt - private!

    Having said that I use a few cheap waterproof match holders for a few things, just not matches:

    1) I too carry petroleum jelly soaked cotton balls in my survival kit. I can pack enough in that little holder to last far longer than I think I could ever stay lost in the mountains, especially if following the stay put rule. No worry of that jelly leaking and getting on anything.

    2) I carry aspirin, ibuprofen, and 2 wrapped cough drops in one. I pack the aspirin in first, Ibuprofen next, followed by the 2 cough drops. I top all this with a cotton ball to keep them immobile where they'd start coming apart and powdering if I didn't. The aspirin is for heart attack emergencies. Have heart issue hiking those deep tall mtns and chewing an aspirin is your best shot of survival. The ibuprofen is for daily headache, muscle soreness, joint pains, etc...treatment. You can carry enough of these in that holder to last you well over a day. Just replenish back at camp at the end of the day if you use any. And the cough drops are for obvious coughing reasons. Elk can hear a long way up in those mnts when all else is dead quiet and you all of a sudden get that tickle.

    The cough drops are on top even though used less. When ibuprofen is needed I'd rather dump those 2 wrapped drops in my dirty hand than bare meds when I need the cough drops.

    3) I get heartburn, sometimes a short bout and sometimes my body just keeps producing. So I put in a few acid blockers like OTC Pepcid and put Rolaids or Tums stacked on top. Antacids stack just right in a column in that holder. As with the aspirin bottle, I put a cotton ball on top to keep things tightly immobile.

    I use a simple permanent marker to indicate what's in each so I don't have to be opening to find out. FS=fire starter, IB=Meds, AA=antacid type stuff. These take little room, keep the contents in needed good condition, air tight & dry, and easy to find in the bottom of my pack.

    I too carry a spark striker and a lighter as my 2 forms of fire start.

    This year I'd better start carrying a spare set of reading glasses....:rolleyes:

    Andy

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    Elk Hunting Checklist

    I operate on two theories:

    1. A comfortable hunter is a good hunter -- and you have to be warm to be comfortable.

    2. You can't count on getting down off the mountain and may have to spend the night there.
     
  15. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    A small tent you can sleep in by yourself to get away from your snoring hunting buddies is the best thing I ever bought.
     
  16. Snowbank!

    Snowbank! Member

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    I wear White caulked pacs with felt liners. They elimonate falling in tough environments. I have walking clothes and horse clothes to control my temperature and sweating. Air force surplus arctic mitts make a huge difference on a long ride at -20F. Hemp rope (1/2") trail/arber saw. A good lariat to tow stuck horses out of the mud or bogs. A handgun for backup.
     
  17. redneck

    redneck Member

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    Since this is about a ride in hunt, lets not forget we have to take care of our horses. I don't ride out west but I do about 100 miles worth of trail rides here every year and here is what I've put together as a saddle bag sized first aid kit for the horses. I carry these quantities for 2-3 horses, may add more bute or another roll of vetwrap if I had more horses out.

    6 tabs of bute (anti inflammatory)
    12 inches of half inch rubber hose (to administer the bute)
    5 large gauze pads (roughly 4"x4")
    1 roll of cling gauze
    1 tube triple antibiotic ointment
    2 rolls of vet wrap
    1 roll waterproof athletic tape
    1 hoof pick

    I keep all this in 2 small dry boxes. Keeps it dry and keeps it from getting crushed. Smashed vetwrap is almost impossible to unroll (especially in the cold on the side of a hill with a bleeding horse)

    I can't find the exact boxes I use but I think this is close
    http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Produ..._UL160_SR160,160_&refRID=0Z5XM8PBMXSQ09QYSG01

    The tube is used to administer the bute. I crush the bute into powder, pour it into the tube, and then blow it into their mouth dry. I would prefer to crush it up in grain, or use a syringe to make a paste, but the dry method here is sure fire in an emergency when you can't have to horse refusing to eat it or spitting it out instead of swallowing it. If I'm not risking being stranded with a lame horse in the middle of nowhere I don't use this method. Just try not to blow it in so hard they end up inhaling it.

    The cling gauze, pads and vetwrap let me bandage legs to minimize swelling or stop bleeding and the waterproof athletic tape keeps the vet wrap from coming loose if you get into water or brush etc. A lot of times when a horse bangs a leg against a log or something, getting a compression wrap on and some anti inflammatories in them immediately can mean the difference between riding out or walking them out on three legs.

    Of course leg wraps can do as much harm as they do good. I wouldn't recommend wrapping legs unless you know the proper way so that you don't cut off circulation or bow tendons. There are lots of good videos online and you could always ask your vet or somebody to show you how.

    Back at the trailer/camp I keep:
    Standing wraps
    A large roll of pillow gauze/quilting
    more vet wrap
    can of antiseptic meant for horses
    wound spray for the minor stuff
    liniment
    more bute
    Nippers
    rasp
    hoof knife

    I have only needed this stuff on the trail once but we were 5 miles from a road and I was dang glad I had it. I'm pretty sure smokey was glad we had it too :D
     
  18. Robert

    Robert Moderator Staff Member

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    I picked up a pair of the Kuiu Attack pants the other day and am fairly impressed. Wore them outside during a really cold windy day and they blocked the wind really well. Now to get the heavier guide pants for late seasons...
     
  19. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Just picked up a new pair of guide pants. Awesome.....
     
  20. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    Past few years, I've shot several multi-day matches in some pretty harsh weather. Last weekend it was winds at 30 gusting to 45mph. Temps just above freezing with rain and sleet, then dropping below freezing and turning to snow/rain/sleet mix. I've not had any severe issues, but I wanted to go into more details about what has worked and what needs improvement

    one thing that i didn't see mentioned was goggles. I actually keep a set in my pack and wore them last weekend until i broke the band and they wouldn't stay on my head. after that, getting pelted in the eyeball with sleet was not fun. Basically, there were several periods of the day when i could not look towards the north. even so, while i was wearing them, if you don't manage your temperature, it's easy to get fogged up. some friends who were issued these suggest cutting some holes in the top/bottom to improve air flow.

    [resize=400][​IMG][/resize]

    another is the gloves mentioned above. I am totally in love with the under armor glove liners. they are very thin and did not affect my ability to manipulate any small objects or even operate my iphone, except i did have to cut a hole in the thumb so i could do the fingerprint touch ID. And they have some traction/texture things embedded on the palm side of the fingers that help you hold things. That's all good because they are really hard to get off and on due to the long compression tube around the wrist. i wore them under swany ski gloves which provided all the warmth i needed even when wet, but they were thoroughly soaked inside and out by day 2, so having the glove liners was important.

    [resize=400][​IMG][/resize]

    I also tried the underarmor cold gear base layer (mostly because I accidentally left my silks at home) and it did the job. Not sure which I like better though. I think the silks are warmer and thinner. anyone have any experience with that beyond the 2nd day?
     
  21. outlawjw

    outlawjw Member

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    High country & late season don't go together. The elk are down or coming down in late season . you need a travel lane during late season because most of the time they are transitioning at that time
     
  22. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    So lets change the term "late season" and lets call it cold weather. That is the intent of this thread.
     
  23. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    FWIW, I simply cannot wear Schnees. My medial malleolus or that knot on the inside of your ankle lines up with the seam between the rubber and leather and it eats a hole in my ankle almost instantly. It's a shame because they are cool boots. So, as with any boot check them out very well before you get stuck in the middle of nowhere with them.

    Also, you don't have to break the bank to stay warm. I have some midweight poly that I bought from Sierra Trading Post years ago for like $12 that I have worn several times at 20 below zero. I just stack them 2 or 3 deep depending. And, I have stripped down and taken a layer or two off when the Chinook winds come in and change everything.
     
  24. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    Here's a tip. Go to Wal Mart and get an ankle brace -- you'll find them in the foot care department. They have a padded section that will protect you there.

    Of course, fit your boots while wearing the brace.
     
  25. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    Thanks for the tip, but they were kind enough to take them back. Probably hadn't been walked in more than a few hundred yards.

    Irish Setter Elk Hunters work OK for me.
     

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