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Beginers deer rifle

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by fpjeepy05, Nov 14, 2012.

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  1. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    257 Roberts, 25WSSM, 6.5x55, 7x57, 6.5 Creedmore, 250 Savage. None of which you can get at you local wal-mart or even Academy, is that rare enough for ya? Not only are they less then common but they are also all fantastic low recoil deer thumpers.
     
  2. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    And none of them are low recoil for a beginner like a .243. All will work at less than 50 yards, so why punish a beginner with more unnecessary recoil?
     
  3. BoilerUP

    BoilerUP Member

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    Do you reload?

    If so, 308 Win using reduced H4895 loads. Cheap components, full house loads available everywhere, and very low recoil/report with 4895 yet plenty of power for deer.
     
  4. snakeman

    snakeman Member

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    Another thing to consider would be a weatherby vanguard or howa in 243 or 7mm-08. Howa does make a 6.5x55 which is probably a great a gun. Just find a gun that fits him well and don't worry so much about the caliber. All of the cartridges that have been listed are more than suitable. I've taken a slew of deer with the 22-250 and never had a problem. Just be sure that he has a gun that shoots well and that he shoots it well and can make a shot to the vitals with ease. These things are much more important than what caliber he uses.
     
  5. jrdolall

    jrdolall Member

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    Get the kid on a gun that he will enjoy shooting. Light recoil, light guns are easy to find without breaking the bank. Also consider the ammo. I was in Academy last week and they did not have any light recoil 30-06 ammo on the shelf. You can always find 30-30 or .243 ammo at Walmart or any store that carries ammo. I have killed umpteen deer with a single shot .243 over the years and I am far from a "kid". Same deal with a Marlin 30-30. Our season opens this Saturday and I will have a Savage 110 30-06 with me.
    For beginners I like the 30-30 because of the light recoil and it will easily handle most whitetail deer shots out to 150 yards without any compensating for bullet drop. A bolt action .243 is also a light recoil gun(my ss is not really that light recoiling) and is great for just about any distance. If you can find a good 6.5 Swede then that is also a great gun for any deer applications though the ammo is not as readily available.

    I have a lot of hunting rifles accumulated over years of hunting so I have multiple calibers. I am letting a friend borrow a Marlin 30-30 this weekend for his grandsons first hunt. He lost all his guns in a burglary earlier this month and insurance has not paid up yet so I gave him a 30-06 for him to use as well. My 12 year old daughter will have the Swede with her. My 14 year old son will have a Remington 30-06 and my 22 year old will probably sleep and skip the morning hunt. If the kid really gets in to hunting then he will certainly want a different rifle as he matures and finds new toys. I sure did/do.
     
  6. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Lever action rifle chambered in a handgun magnum for that range. Anything closer, use a bow. Or a club.
     
  7. RPRNY

    RPRNY Member

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    Howa 1500 7mm-08 youth package.

    Comes with a Stirling Scope which is not great but certainly fine for New England distances. But also comes with two Hogue stocks. A Youth stock which is 12.5" LOP I believe and a full size 14.5" that he can keep using later. 7mm-08 is very versatile and soft shooting, allowing 115 gr bullets out at 3000 fps all the way up to 175 grs at 2400 fps. For NE deer, 150 grs at 2600 fps is plenty.

    I am another 30-30 fan, and for putting down deer and bear in New England, it is ideal. But, if you want a very versatile, low recoil cartridge in a great bolt gun, the Howa Youth Package is the way to go.
     
  8. RedBowTies88

    RedBowTies88 Member

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    SKS or an AK would be great for that range. And the short LOP makes it easy for smaller framed people to fire. Also those guns are just plain cool and enjoyable to shoot so he will most likely have more fun using them both at the range and hunting
     
  9. sansone

    sansone Member

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    oh come on now, just let his dad get him that .243 and be happy
     
  10. Salmoneye

    Salmoneye Member

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    45 yards?

    Shotgun with 00-Buck...

    Or any of the previously mentioned guns...

    Heck...Add in a .357 Mag lever action for grins...

    :D
     
  11. fpjeepy05

    fpjeepy05 Member

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    I agree I think a single shot it best. Also makes for a shorter gun which I think is nice for the young guys.

    What is wrong with the TC Katadin 460. Just shoot 45LC'c out of it and recoil is not a problem. I saw 45LC ammo at Walmart yesterday.

    Also I have nothing against the .243. I think it is a great caliber. Lots of deer have been taken with it I know. Around he the pouchers all use .223 head/neck shots. I think it was the image of the 243, when I was younger, that I didn't feel confident. "Light bullets deflect" "Smallest caliber legal for deer" and the idea that it was a youth rifle. Bullet placement is all that really matters but confidence matters too. I had a nice buck get by me when I was 16, because I never took a shot because I was trying for a head shot and there was some branches in the way. If I'd had a brush wacker like a 35 rem, 44 mag, or 454 casull I think I would have shot.

    I know life is a series of compromises I'm just trying to weigh out the options.
     
  12. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    Beginner?

    I am not sure that there is such a thing as a "beginner's" deer rifle? Does it have training wheels?
    What makes a rifle a beginner's gun?
    The hunter in question is going to have training before the field, yes? So....what is the issue? If he or she cannot handle whatever gun well before hunting, they shouldn't be in the woods.
    There is nothing wrong with the .243 or the .30-30.
    Personally, the .308Win is the choice that I would make, followed by the 7mm-08. A bolt gun in either.
     
  13. yuppiejr

    yuppiejr Member

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    Used Ruger 44 magnum carbine (tube fed preferably) with tech sights and a weekend at Appleseed with a 10/22 equipped with the same sights.
     
  14. Jake L

    Jake L Member

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    I also have a quirky desire to own guns chambered for slightly less common rounds. My 870 is a 20 gauge (not uncommon, but LESS common). My first rifle was a 17 HMR instead of a 22. But I'd have to say that it would be very difficult to find a better rifle for a beginning hunter than a 243. It is a perfectly adequate deer cartridge in every way. It carries more energy than needed for any deer out to 300 yards, and nowadays its easy to choose a bullet that will hold solid and penetrate even on shoulder hits at the high velocities of close range. The great thing about getting a 243 for this hunter would be that they could also use the gun for things like coyotes, woodchucks, ground squirrels, etc. They wouldn't need a new rifle just to hunt a new location where long shots could be encountered.

    But, with all that said, 243 isn't the only good option. 260 rem, 6.5x55, 6.5 grendel in an AR, 6mm, or the lovable 257 Roberts would all be more unique and interesting cartridges without being rare or obscure. All of them have good factory loadings available and likely will for the foreseeable future. All have very low recoil and shoot flat and accurate. I'm out west, and so perhaps thats why I would choose cartridges like these.

    Bottom line, get something that tickles your fancy now, and won't hinder this person from pursuing a variety of hunting opportunities down the road. Thats why I'd choose 243, because of its greater versatility for varmints as well as deer. Generally most new hunters wont be pursuing moose in saskatchewan within the next few seasons, however varmints are always on the menu and a great way to hunt year round.
     
  15. Fishbed77

    Fishbed77 Member

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    OK - gonna play devils advocate here:

    I can't think of any reason why .243 wouldn't be effective on any deer in that region of the country at short ranges. It also gives you the flexibility to make shots at much longer ranges as well in a low-recoil package.

    Why? The lethality of the .243 is hard to dispute for east-coast white-tail. I would be confident to recommend it over any of the more esoteric chamberings or reduced-recoil rounds in the other calibers you mentioned. It's great to be able to walk into any Wal-Mart or hardware store and find the ammo you need.

    I am 34 years old, 6'-1" and weight 225 lbs. I am not recoil-sensitive, and my go-to gun for white-tail is still an early-90s Remington 700 in .243.

    It was the rifle my father bought for my brothers and I to use as teenagers. Why do I still use it? Because it's amazingly accurate and just plain works. Now if I was going after any game larger than our east-coast white-tail, then yes, there are more appropriate calibers. There is no such thing as a do-all gun.
     
  16. brnmw

    brnmw Member

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    Kind of have to agree with this one... I did not have to read any further.
    My suggestion (Always check for legal status of the gun first obviously) would be: .30-30 Win., .357 Mag., .44 Rem. Mag. Marlin Lever, 7.62X39mm Saiga or SKS. Keep it simple I say. If you want a totally new type of caliber to break the mold then mabye a 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical I think they offer it with hunting bullets not just FMJ's. I also know it was designed for low recoil so that would also be great for a beginner. Good Luck. :)
     
  17. mickeydim468

    mickeydim468 Member

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    I am probably going to make someone mad, more directly put, the OP.

    The way I see it, when you were a kid, whoever taught you to hunt/shoot did you a terrible dis-service. Either they did not listen to you when you brought up your hesitation and skepticism regarding the .243, or they too bought into the hype that a .243 wasn't enough gun for those armor plated eastern deer of yours, and perpetuated the problem for you.

    I am 45 years old, I weigh in at 295 lbs and my favorite and most accurate gun in the safe is my .243. I am completely confident that it will take any whitetail deer and have even considered using it on an elk hunt. But I had more appropriate calibers to choose from, so I used my 300 Win Mag.

    If you want an exotic round for deer hunting, that's great, get one and use it, but I don't think a young hunter should have to worry about ammo. He should be worried about learning to shoot well. Later on, he can get into the exotics with you, but get him something isn't to complicated to start off with and let him enjoy the sport for a while, while he is becoming more confident on his own, regarding his own shooting abilities.

    Best of luck to you. I hope you all the best, and I really hope I didn't make you mad. That really wasn't my intention.

    Mike!
     
  18. RPRNY

    RPRNY Member

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    We New Englanders would prefer that you call them by their proper name Deerasaurus Tyrranus. As you know, feeding on cranberries, chowdah, and maple syrup, (and the odd petunia), they grow to massive proportions, are indeed armored, and have big, gnarly teeth (of the saber toothed variety). We believe they really ought to be considered dangerous game. .375 H&H or less at your peril.
     
  19. valnar

    valnar Member

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    I vote for the 6.5x55. It satisfies both groups of people - those that say you need something big like a .30, or something like the .243.

    .243 people say a .30 is not needed
    .30 people say a .243 is not enough

    There, done deal.
     
  20. kanook

    kanook Member

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    If the 460S&W, 445 Super Mag, and 357max work at 100yds out of a pistol, why wouldn't they work out of a rifle.

    As far as being able to find the 445 supermag and 357max in a normal gun store, he is aware it's not common.

    Don't recall seeing where the OP said "no single shot"

    The OP wants a "low recoil" rifle, and those are. They are also very effective.
     
  21. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    460 s&w from a carbine is anything but low recoil. In fact my experience with such a setup is quite the opposite.


    I'm waiting on a 357 Max encore barrel myself but for the interm my youngest can use the 7-08




    posted via that mobile app with the sig lines everyone complaints about
     
  22. shafter

    shafter Member

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    Marlin 336 or Winchester 94. Classic deer rifles that any boy would do well to start out with. I used a Marlin to take my first two deer. I later switched to the Winchester.

    Don't underrate a 357 magnum or 44 magnum levergun. A Winchester 92 replica such as a Rossi would make a good rifle as well. Cheaper practice and softer recoiling. At least with the 357.
     
  23. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    To be fair to the op, i know what he means by not feeling confident with the 243 because the larger calibers are generally considered better for quartering shots, etc. But I think if you give the 243 a chance again you'll like it, and a beginner will shoot it well.
     
  24. elrowe

    elrowe Member

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    As much as I want to scream .257 Roberts, ammo is a bit iffy unless there's a reloading press nearby - down-loaded 120gr soft points would do well for him starting out if handloads are an option. Another one not yet mentioned is 6.8 SPC on an AR platform (provided your part of New England is that permissive). That would give a modular gun to branch out as he becomes more proficient by changing uppers.

    Then again, my grandpa would have said .460 Weatherby Mag. to make a man out of him!!!
     
  25. 627PCFan

    627PCFan Member

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    I second the 35 remington lever followed by a smooth bore shotgun at 45 yards. Might as well knockem over-
     
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