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Best .375 H&H for the dollar?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by MCNETT, Jun 5, 2003.

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  1. MCNETT

    MCNETT Member

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    I am going to purchase a .375 for moose this season. That being said, I want to know the consensus on which rifles are favored and which one I should shy away from.
    -Mike
     
  2. BigG

    BigG Member

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    Look at the CZ550 Magnum.
     
  3. TABING

    TABING Member

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    Without a doubt, a CZ 550 Magnum is the best option, better than most other commercial rifles and less than half the price. I got a 416 Rigby and it's great! Controlled feed, Mauser action with a BIG reliable claw extractor and as extra bonus, a set trigger that lets off at a crisp1 1/ 2 pounds.

    I have 3 CZ rifles and am very satisfied with all of them.
     
  4. MCNETT

    MCNETT Member

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    What should I expect to pay for the CZ?
     
  5. Atticus

    Atticus Member

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    I've seen them selling recently between $688 -$749. Gunsamerica has a few NIB on their site in .375 and .416.
     
  6. B27

    B27 Member

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  7. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    Damn, for that price I should pick one up.

    Not to hunt with, as I really don't hunt much anymore, but more to have...
     
  8. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    Hi I would go with the Winchester Model 70 in stainless..

    1.Cost max about $749
    2.Stainless steel
    3.More versatility in scope mounting
    4.US made

    WildimhoAlaska
     
  9. B27

    B27 Member

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    Mike-
    That's why I got mine. i have no intention of hunting with it. Haven't hunted in decades.
    I just wanted a big belted magnum size bolt action around to mess with. :D
     
  10. Atticus

    Atticus Member

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    If I had $700 to spare I'd placed an order with these guys a week ago. The local High School team is "The Lions". Good enough reason for me to own one.

    A little online confession: I was trying to sell my AR15 a few weeks ago so that I could buy one of these. I was ashamed to admit that this Ohio boy wanted a .375 H&H. I ended up trading AR's with a co-worker that wanted to upgrade. Now I have another AR and enough cash to by two or three boxes of .375 ammo. What can I say...it's a start.

    http://www.impactguns.com/store/cz_safari_mag.html
     
  11. cdbeaver

    cdbeaver Member

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    Safari Rifle

    Friend of mine took a Model 70 Winchester in .375 H&H Mag to Africa last year. Bagged 11 animals with 15 shots (some were taken with a .30-06).

    Included in the bag was a one-shot kill of a cape buffalo. He was very pleased with the .375. Might take it to Australia with him this fall. Hear the 'roos are really tough to put down.

    By the way, the trophy fee just to shoot at a cape buffalo is $7,000. I prefer prairie dogs, myself.
     
  12. B27

    B27 Member

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    Yeah but going in the holes after the wounded ones gives me the jim jams.
     
  13. PJR

    PJR Member

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    The .375 is probably more than you need for moose but better too much gun that not enough.

    The CZ is very good advice but were I so inclined, I'd get a Ruger #1H. One shot should get the job done and they are very neat rifles.
     
  14. ACP230

    ACP230 Member

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    I shot one of the CZ .375s a few years ago.
    I liked the rifle, but not the set trigger.
    I don't think they belong on a rifle that might be used on dangerous critters. Give me a smooth three pound regular trigger instead.

    I shot a Colt Sauer .375 the same afternoon. I had always disliked the way they looked, but handling and shooting one made it look a lot better.
     
  15. B27

    B27 Member

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    The single set trigger on mine, when used un-set, is indeed right at about 3 or 4 pounds. When set it feels like maybe 1 1/2.
     
  16. Glamdring

    Glamdring Member

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    My pick in the Ruger No. 1 it is the next hunting rifle on my list. I've already started buying ammo.
     
  17. nextjoe

    nextjoe Member

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    I'll join the chorus praising the CZs. If you don't like the set trigger, all you have to do is either A) ignore it or B) disable it. Nothing to lose sleep over :-D

    I don't think you can get a better rifle without spending at least 2 or 3 times as much. My CZ .416 Rigby is my favorite rifle, by a wide margin.

    As much as I like the Winchester Model 70, I'd have a VERY hard time trusting a current-production one.

    Best,
    Joe
     
  18. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    Well Dane Burns convinced me Wild Alaska IS correct in selecting the Win mod 70 as it takes $700 or more dollars EXTRA to make a CZ 550 into the perfect choice. The Win Mod 70 is pretty good to go, for the $.:cool:
     
  19. Atticus

    Atticus Member

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    Dane Burns would tell you it takes a grand to make a BHP, 1911 or Glock any good.
     
  20. nextjoe

    nextjoe Member

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    Gordon,

    While I respect Dane's opinion, I have to disagree here.

    First, I'd like to know what exactly needs to be done to the CZ to make it "perfect", and why it costs exactly $700. Mine worked perfectly fine out of the box. It didn't NEED anything extra, other than bedding. I went ahead and had quite a bit of custom work done to make it exactly what I wanted, make it "perfect" FOR ME, but only the bedding job could really be considered necessary. "Perfect" is a pretty subjective thing. For some people, "perfect" comes right out of the factory box. For others, "perfect" means a gunsmith bill that could buy a good used car.

    Second, Dane Burns, as a custom 1911 smith, probably makes a good portion of his income from replacing MIM parts with "real" parts. A lot of people, myself included, don't want any MIM in our guns. Winchester, in the past couple of years, has switched three of the most critical parts of the Model 70 (trigger, sear, and extractor) to MIM. A failure in any one of those parts is BAD news. If I went with a new Model 70, those would all be round-filed immediately and replaced with "real" parts, including a spring-steel extractor. Not "good to go," at least for me.

    USRAC/Winchester quality control has also been spotty lately. Several sources, including "Gun Tests" magazine, reported on Model 70s in belted magnum cartridges that wouldn't feed reliably. There was a quiet recall of stainless Model 70s last year for defective safeties. Then there's the relatively common problem of the receiver bridge being machined improperly, with the result being a scope that runs out of adjustment before it can be zeroed.

    Don't get me wrong, I love the Model 70 *design*. I have some problems with the current *execution* of that design. For my money, the CZ is MILES ahead of the current Winchesters.

    Best,
    Joe
     
  21. B27

    B27 Member

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    The CZ design, which eliminates separate bases by machining them directly into the receiver itself, strikes me as a big plus right there.
    There's four less screws to fail at a really embarassing moment.
     
  22. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    Dane mentioned the bedding as being deficient, but also said the trigger position in th guard was too far forward , the sights were not good and the bolt needed some work . Now the reason he said this was I suggested the CZ550 to somebody looking for a .375. I have a custom SS700 Rem that is pretty light and it has served me in Alaska and else where for 5 years. My first .375 was 25 years ago with a high grade custom FN mauser that is now a retired safe queen. But I said if I was buying the CZ looked good. Now Dane has several beautiful CZ's with his .505 wildcat about purrrfect DGR in my book with 21"barrel , nice fiberglass stock and major metal work so he does like CZ's and has used them. However he said the mod 70 Win .375 with syn stock was USEABLE as is (obviously one without defects) and convinced ME of the wisdom of his choice. Also this choice is echoed by Mad Dog, who is not a big fan of Dane's . So I think there might be some truth here.
     
  23. BusMaster007

    BusMaster007 Member

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    Gordon,

    You're the first one I've seen here post about a Remington 700 / .375.
    Please tell me to what extent your Remington 700 is customized.

    I'm likely to use the 700 as that's what I've been accustomed to, but, I'm attracted to the A-Bolt II for the unusual features of the detachable magazine and BOSS.

    You may have seen my post re the Browning A-Bolt II in .375 H&H, which I'm leaning heavily towards at the moment.

    I'm going to get one or the other in this cartridge.
    I've just got to get the intel to sway me toward a 'Tactical' 700 or a 'Semi-Custom' A-Bolt II.

    I'm interested in the confidence you have or have not in the 700.
    Others on the board here may find your comments very useful, as well.
    Thanks.:)
     
  24. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    I have yet to see a failure in any of those parts...under the most severe conditions...how many have you actually observed..

    Sorry, again I have yet to observe that....and Win 70 375s are very prevelant up here... How many have you seen? How many guns did Gun Tests test?

    Glock has had a recall, Blaser had one, Remington...Winchester had about a three day turnaround up here as I recall, on thier recall. So what? .

    Ive never seen one on a Win 70 375! How many have you seen? I have seen numerous problems with scope zeroing on integral mounts like the Ruger and the CZ...

    Guess thats why you see so many Win 375 stainless rifles here in Alaska, and so few CZs.:D
     
  25. nextjoe

    nextjoe Member

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    Bedding is probably going to need work on ANY big-bore factory rifle, and the CZs are no exceptions.

    I don't really understand what's "not good" about the sights on the CZ. it has a three-leaf express rear sight dovetailed into an integral base on the barrel and a replaceable bead on a banded ramp up front. It's the classic sight setup for a big-bore, and it works very well, being quick and extremely rugged.

    The Winchester actually had a pretty poor rear sight at one time (I don't know if they still use it) that was held on by only one screw.

    The trigger is far forward because of the set feature. You need to be able to put a thumb or finger behind the trigger in order to push it forward to the set position, so there has to be some room behind it. The set trigger itself is a pretty debatable feature, at least for the magnum rifles. I'd actually prefer a Model 70 style trigger instead, but the one CZ uses is safe and reliable, and the set feature can be disabled if you really can't stand it. Ted Blackburn is or was working on a replacement trigger assembly, which would be really nice. Mine will probably get one if Ted produces them.

    I'm not sure what he meant by the bolt needing work. It can be smoothed up by careful stoning (mine's now VERY smooth), and the factory bolt handle is a bit ugly. Still, it's totally functional right out of the box.

    No, the CZs aren't perfect... But by my yardstick, you'd have to move up to a Dakota 76 action or a Granite Mountain action to get a better basis for a big bore, and you're talking what, 4 or 5 times the cost of the complete CZ for a bare action? At that price level, the darn thing had BETTER be perfect! :D

    Best,
    Joe
     
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