Best Gun For Dog Attack

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by mrblenderson, May 27, 2020.

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  1. whm1974

    whm1974 member

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    I was just given you my experience. Yes there a lot of dumbass large dog owners out there who do not know how to take care of large dogs, or raise and socialize them properly.
     
  2. shootstraight57

    shootstraight57 Member

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    When I was working in Florida I got a call for a dog attack on a small infant. The dog was a Pitbull breed and the owner left it with the child sleeping. For some reason the dog attacked the infant which did not make it. I have seen many breeds of dogs and I think Pitbulls are about the worst. I never take an animal for granted and the picture of that incident is forever in my mind, with that being said any gun you have access to in an emergency is better that nothing!
     
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  3. CDW4ME

    CDW4ME Member

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    These replies x2
    When I'm walking my dogs I have pepper gel spray in case of aggressive dog; my dogs are large, GSD & Bullmastiff; but, I'd rather spray a dog and avoid dog vs dog conflict.
    The Glock thats IWB (whenever I'm wearing pants), dogs aint really a reason for that.
     
  4. P5 Guy

    P5 Guy Member

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    Do not under estimate a standard poodle. Look past the foppish hair cuts standard Poodles are large strong dogs.

    https://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/reviews/standardpoodles.html
     
  5. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    You were there. You had hands on. A knife. One big enough to plunge and twist. Up from diaphragm to lung and twist. Done it. It works.
    Head on attack thrust down throat. Up from throat. Straight under chin to chest.
    As far as firing a weapon in city, non issue in defense but with people in scene questionable.
    Defiantly report.
     
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  6. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

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    As has been said already, any caliber that'll work on a human will work on a dog. Doesn't really matter. Sounds like you just need to figure out how to go about making your regular carry gun more readily accessible. So, your post title should probably be "best weapon storage option for dog attack". I consider a gun stored in a safe to be out of play.

    Sounds like a good kid. Tell him chicks dig scars. ;)
     
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  7. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    Any reliable gun you can shoot well would have probably done the job. In your case, you were "hands on" with the dog, so you could have contact shot it. One of those big canisters of bear spray fog would have worked well too- even if some got on some people, it would have been recoverable as long as they didn't have other medical issues (it would have sucked and you may have been sleeping on the couch for a bit, but oh well). When I lived in NC, my house bordered the "back 40" of Ft Bragg. There was an abundance of wild/stray/abandoned dogs in the area. Some of them had been used in illegal dogfighting. People would dump them on Ft Bragg, and they became wild. As a result, I carried a pistol at all times when I was outside doing yard work, working on a vehicle, etc. As for what happened to your family, I would definitely get the authorities involved. If for no other reason, when/if this happens again or escalates, they already know that there is an existing issue where the victims have been previously identified.
     
  8. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    Even one that’s a poor choice, on your person, is going to be better that the best choice that you have unloaded and put up.

    If you didn’t have a small child you could leave a .22 by the door, you could grab on the way out but you are kind of stuck with locked up or on you.
     
  9. AirForceShooter

    AirForceShooter Member

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    File a police report. Get it on the record.

    AFS
     
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  10. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    I carry a firearm whenever it is lawful.

    Perceived likelihood aside, I am more concerned about the potential consequences of criminal attack by a human criminal than by dogs.

    I am quite confident that I can handle a dog problem quite adequately with a walking stick aand pepper spray, without risking shooting someone, charges of reckless endangerment as a result of firing a gun, or getting into a more intense police investigation and resolution process.

    Of course, the gun is available if necessary.

    By the way, a recent episode of the LoSD Blog was devoted to dog attack.
     
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  11. scaatylobo

    scaatylobo Member

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    I understand the impulse to see your pistol as THE solution to that incident.

    Please do look at your actual training to use a pistol at CONTACT distance [ your muzzle ,upon contact will/possibly go out of battery and NOT FIRE ].

    So if your still thinking about the pistol for such use,might I suggest a revolver as it will not go out of battery in contact use.

    Then again I must play the devils advocate and look at the other issues in play.

    Do you know how to take "that shot" with your wife on one side, your child in there somewhere,your dog in between,and you on top. ----------Where will that round go after it penetrates that dog [ and more than likely it will ].

    My thoughts and suggestion are to use a blade for such a horrible incident,and yes I did some training for such.

    IF you get hat attacking dogs back [ as it appears you did ] then a LOCKED blade [ or fixed blade ] could do as your choke hold did ,but the result will be BLOODY & death to that attacking animal.

    Allowing the attacking dog to get away,could mean you just have to fight it off again,from a frontal attack now.

    Just my 00.02 cents.
     
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  12. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Nothing. The only gun worth jack- for defending yourself is the one you are carrying. If you won't carry it, it's useless.

    As others have pointed out, a gun is not necessarily a total solution. With a chaotic field of fire, it sounds like you had no choice but to go hands on. That said, once you get a grip on the attacking dog, a couple rounds of any cartridge at muzzle-contact range, into head or chest cavity, it likely to be an instant game changer.

    Carry the damn gun.
     
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  13. Browning

    Browning Member

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    I’d pick whatever one you’re willing to carry all the time, even at home.

    If I’m awake I have a pistol on me. Might be a single stack 9mm instead of a Glock 19, a CZ P10C or a Glock 26, but I have one.

    Personally I’d have used a knife depending on what my background was on the shot. I have a knife on my 24/7 except when I’m in the shower. Even when I’m sleeping. I typically wear cargo shorts or sweats to bed, still have a knife on me.

    If the back half of the dog was a clear shot then shoot that and then finish it off once it lets go.

    With a knife you don’t have to worry about it though. The knife won’t go through and kill your wife or son, just control the cuts and saw its throat open.
     
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  14. bassjam

    bassjam Member

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    Looks like scaatylobo beat me to this, but if you think about the logistics of a dog attack, you aren't in the best position to always use deadly force when protecting a loved one that's being attacked. That dog will have them on the ground, and there will be a LOT of thrashing and movement on the part of both the dog and the victim. There you are, looking down, and you need to be able to hit a moving target and NOT hit the victim. Is a firearm the best option in that scenario?

    I don't know. I suggest anyone concerned to watch some video's of dog attacks and make their own decisions.

    Several years ago I opened my side garage door with my wife right behind me and found 2 pit-bulls literally inches from my crotch. I know not all pits are vicious, but I also understand that they have a greater ability to kill than other dogs of that size. My immediate response was to lunge towards the dog and aggressively yell, and fortunately that worked. The dogs took off running, and my 75lb golden retriever (who was hiding in the woods watching) started chasing the pits when he saw them start running. He chased them across the street and 250 yards across the bean field before he turned around and came back. I started carrying pepper spray in my pocket around the home after that and placed baseball bats at the garage door and front door. Not long after I picked up a little NAA .22 and carried that instead. That was before I had kids.

    Once we started having kids, my wife and I decided to make the relatively large investment to fence in our 1.5 acre yard. Not only does it keep the kids inside, but it also keeps animals out.
     
  15. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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    yes, and very smart. Poodles are a very old breed and were originally bred as guard dogs. Even the small versions are very protective and alert to intruders in the area.

    I have no problem with any dog breed per se, rather I have issues with ignorant dog owners who think it’s cool or macho to have a seriously strong and dangerous breed, be it a Rhodesian, a Great Dane, a Pit, a Rottie, or whatever. It is a huge responsibility, and I’d say a bigger one than carrying a gun, since a gun won’t take off on a split second at a 30MPH dash to attack another animal or a person.

    I have friends with very large, dangerous breeds. I like their dogs. But for sure, I won’t hesitate to respond lethally as needed if it becomes dangerous and out of control and the situation warrants it.
     
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  16. Hartkopf

    Hartkopf Member

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    I live out in the country but not far enough out. There is a neighbor that doesn't control his dogs and that's part of the reason I carry on my property. Find a comfortable leather/kydex holster and carrying 16 hours a day is not a problem. I'm armed when I take out the trash or get the mail because I like my left arm not chewed off.
     
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  17. mrblenderson

    mrblenderson Member

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    A lot of good things to consider in here. I may go back to carrying at all times, I can at least keep a j-frame on me regardless of what I'm wearing.

    Regardless, I am going to tell my wife that my internet friends agreed that I 100% need to purchase a new firearm.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2020
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  18. CDW4ME

    CDW4ME Member

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    In 10mm. :D

    45 acp is also good. :thumbup:
     
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  19. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

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    If the idea is to respond to a threat NOW, having it in the safe does no good. Depending on what I'm doing in the back yard, I've either got a double stack 9mm or a pocket .380 on me.
     
  20. brunowbe

    brunowbe Member

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    I also have Dobermans (12 year old who is “retired” from any protection duty and a 1 year old who is still learning) and a German Shepherd. They are the best protection in my neighborhood from other dogs and from keeping people away from my home/yard. I live in an “urban” environment in a fairly small city where discharging a firearm is not the best option (you’ll get charged for discharging within city limits or at least have to go through the wonderful legal system).

    That being said, we keep a few loaded handguns in drawers/safe places that only my wife and I know where they are (daughter is older and recently moved out) just in case, along with always having mace or some sort of spray on us when working our dogs outside. Last summer, my wife was working our GSD and was attacked by 2 pits from across the street. Our GSD was able to keep them off her and they were ultimately corralled by their owner with no harm to my wife or our dog. We reported it and were advised by the police and animal control to carry some sort of spray. That’s what we’ve done since. Due to this my GSD now is aggressive towards unknown dogs (he and I got attacked a week later while out on a run from another pit off leash), but we never have him off leash around other dogs or off property unless in a controlled environment (parents house out in the country or something similar). The issue now is other dog owners of foo foo breeds, “friendly” breeds, etc, who do not pay attention to their surroundings or listen when I am running him or walking him when I warn them he is aggressive towards other dogs. They think it’s funny when their dog barks at him or acts aggressive after being warned to keep away, when he lets off a bark or shows aggressive body language they make some comment about controlling him (he’s under control, a leave it command shuts him down), it’s those types of idiot dog owners I can’t stand.
     
  21. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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    Good post. I totally appreciate your desire for security capable dogs and glad you have solid control. That said, may be a good idea to re-socialize your GSD. They are smart dogs and can adapt back to a more social critter when not threatened.

    totally agree folks who have ankle biters need to control their dogs attitudes as well. They do t have a clue the crap their little Fido can cause. Bo different then the parents of a spoiled brat who mouths off to the wrong person and gets a beat down.
     
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  22. brunowbe

    brunowbe Member

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    @Buzznrose:

    We have put him through more training and socializing with the younger Dobe when she went through her training. The trainer (quick plug for Nick at North Coast K9 for anyone in north central Ohio) did excellent work with them, as he and his wife did with our old girl (she’s in my avatar). He’s gotten a lot better, which is why he responds with a leave it command, but we are always trying to improve with him.

    Back to gun related, use what gun you have available if applicable :)
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2020
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  23. shoobe01

    shoobe01 Member

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    Lots of vaguely relevant tales of aggressive dogs threatening around here, a few bites that end immediately so nothing to do, etc but this seems relevant:

    So we were dogsitting for a vague friend. Dog we do't really know. 12 hours after dropoff, some other people are over, things are generally loud so I didn't see what started it, but the cats have started to come out after a few hours. For some reason, guest dog grabs onto the oldest of our cats in the middle of the kitchen. There is much noise, then that makes the three babies/toddlers scream, etc. No one is much doing anything, but within about 4-5 seconds I am there. Yup, got a flashlight, folder, and pistol on me as I usually do. And... not going to shoot a dog threatening not-a-human. In my house? Ha! Hypothetically if it was outside on sand (no richochets) the threatened animal is IN the dog, there are people's hands and feet at least crossing the background all the time. Is someone in the laundry room below us? I don't /think/ so but... Where's the gas line again, cause it crosses under this floor right around here below us???

    Yes, thought of all this, trying to figure out how far down the decision tree I put knife or gun but start with just grabbing the collar/scruff (without collar, could probably still have gotten enough of a handful of the dog if needed), three tries with increasing force, lift the front up, push/drop against my extended arm: eventually the cat pops out. I suspect I am also yelling "drop it!" but do not recall. Blood everywhere, matted bloody fur cat laying there not moving very fast. I keep ahold of the dog (hard, front legs off the ground a bit to try to keep the leverage away in case it tries to bite me), have someone else get a leash and they take it... I forget? I think the crate in the dining room.

    Hands on was fastest, legally upright, best for my new hardwood, safest for all the humans.

    (For those who want the rest of the story: phone calls resulted in the owner scheduling a paid place to drop it off for the rest of the vacation, which a friend did very rapidly, while we were at the vet. The bloodly cat was fine. Squished, bruised, so we kept her comfortable and stress free for a few days until she was happy to walk around/eat again, but all the blood was from the dog putting the back half of a creature full of claws it's it's mouth. Cat got some blows in there).
     
  24. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    Maybe the OP mentioned it and I missed it, but I'm curious as to what the neighbor's response was.

    As to the question, it really doesn't matter.
    The one time a dog came in our yard and growled at my daughter, who was 5 or 6 at the time, all my dad had on him was a .22 and it did the trick just fine.
     
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  25. ericuda

    ericuda Member

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    Youth 20 gauge 870 kept at door.
     
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