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Best micrometer adjustment seating die?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Lucky Strike, Jan 25, 2010.

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  1. Lucky Strike

    Lucky Strike Member

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    I've got a Dillon 550B and use dillon dies and the setup works good once the dies are set. I am wanting to get more into experimenting with different recipes and bullet types though and setting the seating die is definitely a frustrating experience. I want to get one with a micrometer adjuster to make things easier.

    I know they're spendy but after dealing with setting the seating die to a specific depth again last night I will gladly pay the premium $.

    Just wondering which of the ones out there gives the best performance as far as accuracy/precision of the micrometer adjustment.

    this is for 9mm
     
  2. lykoris

    lykoris Member

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    I can only talk from experience about the redding but without doubt I'm 100% happy with their competition seating die.

    consistently accurate to 1 thousandth of an inch all day long.

    I use them on all calibres.

    Worth every penny!
     
  3. RandyP

    RandyP Member

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    no negative issues with my Lee dies. the price is pretty reasonable too.
     
  4. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

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    Redding with Forster a close second or arguably a tie.

    I wasn't aware Lee offered micrometer seating dies.
     
  5. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I agree on all three counts.
     
  6. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    +3

    Jimmy K
     
  7. J2FLAN

    J2FLAN Member

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    Many thousands of bullets seated with the REDDING COMP DIE. The settings are repeatable and accurate, I say, well worth the price.
     
  8. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    For 9mm? I don't think it matters what seating die you use. There's enough play in the toolhead to press fit with a Dillon 550b to negate any precision you might gain with a micrometer seating die. I don't see the need for a special seating die loading 9mm with any press.

    But if you feel you have to, I imagine it would be hard to beat a Redding.
     
  9. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

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    So, when the case enters the die, do you think the toolhead stops at various spots?

    Variances on progressives are generally cause by press flex and/or inconsistent operation.
     
  10. SharpsDressedMan

    SharpsDressedMan member

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    I also have a Redding Comp Seat die, and I like it.
     
  11. gearheadpyro

    gearheadpyro Member

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    Love my own Redding Comp Die, wouldn't trade it for anything. Very consistent seating depths, within .0005" in my Co-Ax
     
  12. Historian

    Historian Member

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    I haven't tried a Redding but, at the recomendation of someone on this forum whose opinion I greatly respect, I went with a Forster and found that my marksmanship improved remarkably with the very first batch of .223 that I loaded. I'm sold on the Forster dies.

    Historian

    "A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of a common enemy."

    Samuel Adams
     
  13. snuffy

    snuffy Member

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    The ONLY micrometer seating die I've been able to find is made by Redding.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=610299

    To me, it's like trying to make a silk purse out of a sows ear to want a micrometer seating die for 9mm. The bullets commonly used just aren't precise enough to benefit from that much precision when seating. Then the pistol won't know it has a precisely seated bullet loaded in it.

    Wait until grow up to where you're seating rifle bullets to get worried about micrometer seating dies.
     
  14. Historian

    Historian Member

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    +1 for Snuffy's advice. Wait until you're loading rifle rounds before you drop a bundle on a Redding or Forster. I seat my .40 S&W with a plain ole RCBS. Works just fine.

    Historian
     
  15. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=177340

    If the question is:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------"I've got a Dillon 550B and use Dillon dies and the setup works good once the dies are set. I am wanting to get more into experimenting with different recipes and bullet types though and setting the seating die is definitely a frustrating experience. I want to get one with a micrometer adjuster to make things easier"

    The answer is:

    "The Competition Seater Die features a micrometer for super accurate bullet seating depths in increments of .001". The bullet inserts through a side window instead of the bottom of the die and a special seating guide ensures correct alignment before and after seating. Not for use with progressive presses"

    I use a height gage to set the height of the seater plug stem (in thousands) when adjusting the seater plug, of the depth gage end on the dial caliper.

    I do not use Dillon dies, I use a lock-out, or powder die on progressive presses, the 550B is one position short

    F. Guffey
     
  16. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    or the depth gage end of the dial caliper.

    sorry about that,

    F. Guffey
     
  17. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    My 9MM seater is a Hornady with their micrometer top on it. It works well and I can dial back to a setting for a particular bullet. It was not well marked. I had to carefully trace all the lines & numbers with a fine magic marker so I could read it easily.

    You can move the top from die to die, as long as it is a Hornady seater of course, but it always stays on my 9MM seater.

    It is pretty much the cheapest way out to get a micrometer top for pistol rounds.

    It doesn't load ammo any straighter than the Hornady die without the micrometer top. It also does not load any more consistently as far as variences in O.A.L., but what I like about it is the ability to dial back to a setting for whatever bullet I am using.

    Pretty much. It doesn't work any better. What I like about it is the ability to dial back to any given bullet. It's convenient and fast when changing bullets.

    Micrometer seaters are a great deal handier for rifle as far as load work up goes, but the same thing can be accomplished with other tools.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010
  18. SteveW-II

    SteveW-II Member

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    > It was not well marked. I had to carefully trace all the
    > lines & numbers with a fine magic marker so I could read
    > it easily.

    I also find all of Hornady's micrometers very hard to read. I will give the magic market a try to see if it improves the readability.
    Thanks for the idea.
     
  19. dagger dog

    dagger dog Member

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    I have the "micrometer" seating die that comes with the RCBS Competition die set .308 Win cal..

    I love the feature of the bullet guide, it helps controll bullet run out, and the window cut in the side of the die makes placing the bullet in the guide very easy. The numbers and graduations are very clear brilliant white against the blackend die.

    Was having some repeatabily problems with seating depth, the loaded rounds were coming out of the die all over in different depths and this should be controlled down to the 0.001" according to the graduations on the die and "micrometer" barrel.

    Had this problem with others non mike styles and when this happens it usually means it is time for a cleaning, so I removed the "Micrometer" barrel and screw.

    Most who reload have had experiance with mikes and that buttery smooth feel of the barrel turning on fine threaded screws, well the threaded rod was fitted with tight fitting rubber Orings, some on the threaded rod and some on the body of the die over which the mike barrel slid. Wasn't dirty just enough SPONGEY movement of the orings when trying to seat a bullet into the tight neck of the case, and not an overly tight bullet grip.

    So in knowing now what I know about the RCBS Competition Seater I think I would try another brand of True prcesion Micrometer style seater.
     
  20. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Redding and Hornady - .38/.357 & 9MM

    [​IMG]

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    .38 Spl & .357 Mag

    I use one Dillon sizer for both calibers and one Redding competition seater for both calibers. I made a flat seater stem from an original one. (welded up & turned on my litttle hobby lathe. It will seat anything from the .38 SPl WC flush to the longest .357 load I use. I just dial back to my recorded setting, check it, and go. I use separate expanders and crimp dies.

    The .38 die box has the sizer, the expander set up for .38, and a roll crimp and taper crimp die. Both crimp dies are set for a heavy crimp, and I use spacers to get lesser crimps when needed.

    The .357 die box has the seater, an expander set up for .357, and a roll and taper crimp die, both set for heavy crimps. I just use the spacers to get the crimp I want.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010
  21. 45ACPUSER

    45ACPUSER Member

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    About your only choice is the Redding Competition Seater Die.
     
  22. Lucky Strike

    Lucky Strike Member

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    Thanks for the replies...the comments on not being practical for working up precise loads for 9mm are understood. But I still will likely load various bullet size/types so something that I can just quickly dial to a specific depth depending on which bullets I'm using is worth the money. Given the difference in cost I'll likely go with a Forster for this.

    I have .223 dies as well but have yet to start reloading with them (Local gunshop offers a reloading class and I want to take it before I get into loading rifle ammo)....I'll probably get a Redding die when I start in on .223
     
  23. lgbloader

    lgbloader Member

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    I too use Redding Comp dies for 9mm, 38 spcl/357, and 45ACP for the same reasons as Walkalong. Different bullets.

    I also use the comp sets or at least run the comp seater for a few of my rifle calibers.
    They are great dies.

    LGB
     
  24. jeepmor

    jeepmor Member

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    I think the OP fully gets that it may not be magic for his accuracy, just convenience. It won't hurt accuracy, but it definitely help with setup speed.

    Speaking of timesavers, I see those LNL bushings on those dies. Those devices were a huge improvement in my productivity. I bought their LNL progressive just so I could have that bushing system....and the free bullets.

    Sorry, veering off course here.

    jeepmor out.
     
  25. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

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