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Best sharpener for Khukhri-style blades...?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by KBintheSLC, Mar 11, 2009.

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  1. KBintheSLC

    KBintheSLC Member

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    I have a new Khukhri knife and I am trying to figure out what the best type of sharpener would be for the contoured blade. I normally use flat stones/carbide slabs, but I wonder if a round diamond bar might make it easier. Will you Khukhri folks share? What tool do you prefer to sharpen the Khukhri blade?
     
  2. mole

    mole Member

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    My brother uses a flat bastard cut mill file and then sandpaper on a phonebook. Seems to work for him.
     
  3. CWL

    CWL Member

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    The easiest way to sharpen the convex blade is on a belt sander. If you have 300 grit or finer belts, you can sharpen-up the khuk on that. You do need to keep a bucket of water next to you to dip the blade so it doesn't overheat.

    Start with lower grits and change to 600-1200 grit to put on a final polish to the edge. Strop afterwards to remove the wire.

    It isn't that hard although I suggest you search online for instructions.
     
  4. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    I strongly suggest you go to BladeForums.com, and look through the Himalayan Imports forum. One popular suggestion for convexed kuks involves a mouse, iirc.

    I've used a Spyderco Sharpmaker before, or just the chakma.

    John
     
  5. alaskanativeson

    alaskanativeson Member

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    I've had really good luck with the DMT Ceramic Chef's Steel which is a round ceramic, but unlike most ceramic rods, this one is basically unbreakable. I've had mine hanging in my kitchen for a long time and have been very impressed with its performance on blades of most all shapes. Of course it won't do much for my fine serrations, but that's why I also have a Spyderco Sharpmaker.

    The DMT is great for recurve blades.
     
  6. feudalson

    feudalson Member

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  7. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    I do not advise anyone who does not have a lot of experience with powered systems to try to sharpen with them. You can wreck your knife and/or end up severely injured.

    Convex edges can be sharpened using a series of abrasive papers on a dense deformable pad. Mouse pads, neoprene foam, thick leather, and even phone books can make a base. I like dense foam pads for this. This allows you to draw the knife across the abrasive while the foam takes a curve to match the convex edge.
     
  8. KBintheSLC

    KBintheSLC Member

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    Thanks for the info... I'll likely try the non-motorized methods first. I have used a belt sander to sharpen knives in the past, but I only use it when the blade is in really bad shape. I just need something to "touch up" the edge at this point.

    On second thought, I do need to get rid of this hallow grind and make it into a convex. My Khukhri is not one of the high-end ones from HI... its just a Ka-Bar. It seems to do the job so far though.
     
  9. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    I use my Spyderco Sharpmaker for almost all my knives.
    For the larger stuff like a Machette I flat clamp the blade to a bench or vice mounted board( 2X4) and use a flat mill file till the edge "rolls over".
    Then do the other side of the blade and then "draw file" both sides.
    I finalize the edge wtih a round Carborundum axe stone using pleanty of oil.
    Belt sanders are great for sharpening things provided one has developed the required "technique" otherwise a ruined blade is the result.
    As an example a mower blade sharpened properly should have a uniform , straight bevel verses a faceted edge.
    I use a 1hp sander with a 36 grit belt for this chore.
    A small bucket of water is advisable but usually a belt sander is not a apt to overheat the blade as is a grinding wheel.
     
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