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Best Tomahawk?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Tired_and_hungry, Aug 28, 2013.

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  1. Tirod

    Tirod Member

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    Very few gouge a hole in their skull with a framing hammer or pickaxe. Goes to being familiar with the tool by using it carefully until experience has conditioned you to not do the wrong thing.

    I would expect anyone used to hammering nails to have insight into how to hold the nail on the first strike to know that, but it's not common knowledge much in a world of no father at home and cordless drill drivers. In my day, my father even taught me how to hammer a bent nail straight for reuse. Most just throw them on the floor and sweep them up now.

    Spike hawks have a place - in primitive conditions where you are more likely to carry in your tools on your person. Not drive in with a tool box in the back of the truck. And their purpose isn't so much to build, as in stick frame construction. That's why you rarely see spike hawks in hardware stores - they sell building tools there, not deconstruction tools used in Fire, LEO, or military use. They have a few, tho, for tearing things apart, and the one trait they share is a spike, not a hammer.

    There are very few these days who spend a few weeks in the woods living entirely with the things they carry - I wouldn't base my tool decisions off what a hardware store sells construction workers. Preferably, those who have used tools in the past in primitive conditions would be the historic legacy, and those who do so today in primitive conditions would update that. Like language, what we used to use in yesteryear has changed, just the same as what we define a word to mean.

    Then, a rifle was a wood and steel flintlock fired muzzleloader, now it includes semi automatic forged aluminum and composite magazine fed versions. Todays tomahawk includes both the old, and new, but it doesn't make the new ones less versatile. The users skill level and experience is the only thing that can do that.

    If all you know is the old tools, you can't use the new ones to their fullest extent. It's the same with those who use the modern tomahawk - they aren't limited in how they use them, they are too busy opening up third world construction, searching cars, prying into crates, boxes, electrical panels, or digging up things in full tactical gear to worry about who's sense of what is "correct" might be offended.

    Spike hawks are here to stay, reborn for modern use. You can either take advantage of them or not, but piling on objections against them is really no different than saying the self loading cartridge rifle is "too dangerous." Which is why even Lincoln's general's wouldn't adopt the lever action rifle - too staid and self righteous to learn better.

    Ironic how that is coming from posters using the internet and even smart phones to do so. Y'all didn't think typing a letter to the admin would get the job done, right? Why cling to outmoded definitions and a lack of understanding to justify an opinion? Browning, Garand, Stoner, and Kalashnikov didn't. We celebrate their advanced designs (all of which are now dated,) but we won't accept the new uses of the tomahawk which predates all of their weapons by hundreds of years?

    It's America, you can disagree to your heart's content. I'll be happy knowing that just like after the Vietnam War, there was a new appreciation for what that newfangled design Army rifle could really do - which is now the dominant category of largest growth in firearms, the AR15. Same for the tomahawk - used in our latest excursion by troops who knew how, now a rapidly rising tool of choice as they transition into Law Enforcement and Rescue.

    Nothing wrong with tradition, but consider the definition of what it is, the revering of old methods in deference to what they used to mean. Not necessarily what we need to get the job done today.

    Who's got a rotary dial app for their smart phone?
     
  2. Critical J

    Critical J Member

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    @ shafter

    The spike is for busting things open while saving your blade, from concrete to window panes, but I mostly employ it in climbing steep embankments (or, ya know, what he ^ said)

    Did you also know that the whistler holes in the blade are for pulling free your hawk from the head thereby saving your screw connections, instead of prying it loose?
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  3. Mr. T

    Mr. T Member

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    I got the SOG Fast Hawk and I use it for trimming saplings for shooting lanes for our deer blinds. It works pretty good, but it doesn't replace a good hatchet. I've got a couple of Gerbers for hatchets and they work much better on larger sized trees 6" to 8" in size. I was so impressed with their hatchets that I bought a couple of their camp axes too. The hatchets were probably the most versatile though...if you had to use one for self defense I would have to say that they would be devastating.
     
  4. Critical J

    Critical J Member

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    - fyi -

    @ Mr. T
    the FastHawk is meant to be their combat model, you want the full sized Tomahawk, which tackles all manner of camp chores, etc.

    What any good 'hawk needs is a sidekick. Example, SOG's full sized Tomahawk is an updated version of the old military V-Tac, so the perfect counter sidekick is naturally your classic military K-Bar, once you wrap the 'hawk shaft in leather. Alternatively, if you go for the slick, little polished-up FastHawk, then the Buck Special is gonna match perfectly!
     
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