Best/worst Gun AUTHORS (of fiction)

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by boomer1911a1, Feb 12, 2007.

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  1. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Darn it.. going from memory I thought "The Lieutenant" was correct.. too lazy to get up and look. It's "Final Blackout". doh! You'll understand if you've read the book though and it's been a long time.
    "No Country for Old Men" (Cormac McCarthy) was pretty good. I think in the book there was like one thing that bothered me but I forget what it was.. and it really wasn't the shotgun.
     
  2. tomrkba

    tomrkba Member

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    AWFUL: John Shirley, especially in Everything is Broken. This guy is a real piece of...something. The entire plot could have been stopped in about 15 seconds by four men with California-PC long guns and some determination. The author spends most of the book demonizing liberty and self-sufficiency.
     
  3. HOOfan_1

    HOOfan_1 Member

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    The Stand certainly showed guns in a decent light, although King is much closer to be an anti.....http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2013/01/25/stephen-king-releases-gun-control-essay/


    I am pretty sure there were some glaring errors in The Stand though. I can't remember exactly what it was, but I think he invented a caliber or something
     
  4. Beentown

    Beentown Member

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    Good:

    Robert R McCammon
    Vince Flynn
    David Baldacci
    Brad Thor
    Larry Corriea

    Bad:

    Most other I have tried to read them.
     
  5. Manco

    Manco Member

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    Early on Koontz seemed fixated on portraying certain weapons, and didn't account for their strengths, weaknesses, and manners of use very well, but he has expanded his familiarity with the subject considerably since then. It probably wasn't a chore given his personal enthusiasm for firearms and support for our Second Amendment rights.
     
  6. Ranger Roberts

    Ranger Roberts Become a THR contributing member!

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    Couldn't agree more!!
     
  7. Corpral_Agarn

    Corpral_Agarn Member

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    Dick Francis

    The last Dick Francis novel i read had some good gun detail in it.
    i think it was Twice Shy?
    one of the characters shoots a Mauser and a .22 custom rifle for competitions.

    Also in (forgot the name) he has a character that's kinda like a secret agent, but we never really know for sure, that carries a Luger and uses it well.

    Both seemed pretty spot on to me. Good descriptions and even better action sequences that are closer to reality than many others i have read.

    Stephen King was good till i read in one of the Dark Tower books how the character "popped out the cylinder" of Colt SAA to reload. They were still fun to read but i ignored some of the guns stuff after that.
     
  8. kBob

    kBob Member

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    Far as I know Linda E. Evans has never made a modern gun error in her Science Fiction whether "here", the near future, or folks from those places time traveling.

    But I am biased.

    -kBob
     
  9. dprice3844444

    dprice3844444 member

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  10. kBob

    kBob Member

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    Looking back through some of the post over the last six and a half years on this thread I noted someone commented on Dean Ing doing his research. Yes he does.

    Anyone read his remake of the Soft targets stuff where a bad lady leaves a HK P7 where a youngster can get to it? He basically worked that scene out in a hallway of the World SF/F convention in Baltimore the year KAL 007 was splashed by the Russians. He had a long talk with an HK P7 owner and all around gun nut about the feasibility of the scene and whether a P7 was a good choice.

    He also spoke with the owner a Taurus Barfetta 92 clone about that and other guns.

    The three of us had a nice half hour or so avoiding other fans in a side hall after being surrounded in the more open area.

    -kBob
     
  11. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    I was going to mention Hunter and Baldacci. I've read a lot of Hunter's stuff, but only one of Baldacci's. Most were before I really became a gun guy like I am today, but I remember them having a lot of gun detail. I was also less than impressed with Ludlum's gun detail, although I did like the stories. Clancy seems pretty good too, though he seems more concerned with military hardware than small arms.
     
  12. Radagast

    Radagast Member

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    kbob:
    Are you related or is that your nom de plume? Either way I've bookmarked her Baen page for future purchases. Baen writers tend to be in the good to great band and I like to support gunny authors.
     
  13. 9MMare

    9MMare Member

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    I hope it was many yrs ago.....he's been dead for almost 15 yrs.

    Edit: Wow, this is an old thread...he'd only been dead 6 yrs when this thread was started!
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013
  14. JohnhenrySTL

    JohnhenrySTL Member

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    Cormac Maccarthy is my favorite modern author. I loved the guns, and gun scenes in the movie "No Country for Old Men." Heck, I loved the whole movie, one of my favorites of all time.

    No Country for Old Men the book, has gun descriptions that entail characteristics of the shooters and their own expressed personality traits to a climax I am unable to even attempt to explain on the internet. As it has been too long since I read it, I may be wrong about this, but I believe he dove right into characterizing a custom built .270 on the first page. If anybody has read it, and found his gun talk flawed, or noticed
    it sound, please let me know. Thanks all for the great thread. Forgive my abstract language, lol.
     
  15. GrOuNd_ZeRo

    GrOuNd_ZeRo Member

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    Dan Brown has a tendancy to invent firearms, I can't remember what he called it but it provided no results on a search engine, he described it as being very large, I highly doubt the Swiss Guard would be armed with anything large and exotic described in the book, other guns were very generically mentioned.

    In another Dan Brown book, deception point, he described the Delta-Operators to have 'snub-nose machineguns', two terms NEVER used in the same sentene, the only weapons I could envision was a P90, MP-5K or perhaps a M249 Para model or something like a M60E.
     
  16. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    Good:

    Stephen Hunter
    Larry Correia
    Michael Z. Williamson

    Adequate:

    Vince Flynn
    Tom Clancy
    Dale Brown
    David Baldacci (Sometimes)
    Stephen Hunter (Sometimes)

    Abysmal:

    David Baldacci
    David Morrell
    Robert Ludlum

    Actually, most all Baen authors are pretty good, too, but you seldom see firearms minutiae in most.
     
  17. Tom Fury

    Tom Fury Member

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    Craig Johnson could do a better job (Longmire)

    Sometimes I think he subcontracts the gun bits out; either he doesn't know one end of a 1911 from the other or he just does a bad job of describing the experience (which too many of us have had to not notice)
    Cheers, TF
     
  18. Rittmeister

    Rittmeister Member

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    Anybody into W.E.B. Griffin? The Brotherhood of War series, Badge of Honor, and The Corps all have pretty good gun details, mostly centered around the weapons available to our armed forces during WWII and the Korea/Vietnam War eras.

    They're not really action novels per se but the scenes where there is action are pretty well researched and written. Particularly memorable is a scene where two of the main characters in the BOW series are detailed to Greece just after the end of WWII and a crusty old Warrant Officer armorer is explaining the personal weapons available to them, which are mostly captured German or surplus British weapons as the US-supplied stuff hasn't started arriving yet in quantity.

    They're good reads if your into minutiae. I'm not as impressed with Griffin's most recent efforts, he's been co-writing with another author (Butterworth, I think) and the tone of the books has changed significantly.
     
  19. X-JaVeN-X

    X-JaVeN-X Member

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    I will honestly say that I am a bit inept in this category, but I will mention, only because I remember my wife and father in law talking about how much they enjoyed the book(s). I had to google search the author's name as I only knew what they called the book.

    The name of the book that I remember hearing them talk about was "The Things They Carried" by Tim O'Brien. I don't know if this fits your criteria, but you might want to check it out.
     
  20. Tom Fury

    Tom Fury Member

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    I remember Stephen King

    annoyed me a couple times in 11/22/63, which was otherwise a fantastic read; I think it had more to do with one of his characters I liked getting hurt because they either didn't have access to or had bad knowledge of how to use a gun they had access to; He's much better on vintage Rock 'n Roll...
     
  21. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey member

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    Has anyone mentioned Louis L'Amour? I have to shake my head every time I read "How The West Was Won" when one of the main characters ,Linus Rawlings, fires three shots as fast as he can aim with what (based on the time period) must be a flintlock

    To be fair though it's still a good book
     
  22. HoosierQ

    HoosierQ Member

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    Tony Hillerman RIP

    Tony Hillerman is both. He seems not to understand handguns very well as his police officers are always "removing the safety catch" from their revolvers when they're in imminent danger. Gangsters with .38 caliber automatics (there is the .38 Super of course so he gets a pass there I suppose).

    He's, however, always got his rifles right. Lot's of 30-30s (none with safeties), bolt actions, and other hunting rifles.

    He was a veteran of D-Day I believe.
     
  23. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Who's the most cheeseball? I remember reading some Mickey Spilane or somesuch and his gun scenes were akin to the old Batman series or comic books complete with POW!, WHOMP!, "SOCK!, etc. etc. Pretty fun reads though.
     
  24. 762 X 54r

    762 X 54r Member

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    I will also put in for correia.
     
  25. GoWolfpack

    GoWolfpack Member

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    Not a lot of gun minutia in "The Things They Carried" except for general description of types of weaponry carried by foot soldiers in Vietnam. A fascinating book though. Quick and very engaging read about the emotional toll of serving in Vietnam.

    If they liked that book, they should try reading "Short Timers" by Gustav Hasford, the book that formed the basis for "Full Metal Jacket".


    I'm glad Stephen King learned to just steer clear of too many gun details. I would rather read less detail than wrong detail, and I love his storytelling.
     
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