Better for first timer - duty-size 9mm or .38?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Skribs, Apr 13, 2016.

?

Which non-.22 pistol for new shooters to try?

Poll closed May 13, 2016.
  1. Duty size 9mm

    35 vote(s)
    26.7%
  2. Ruger GP-100 with .38s loaded

    35 vote(s)
    26.7%
  3. Both are good options

    44 vote(s)
    33.6%
  4. Something else (see below)

    6 vote(s)
    4.6%
  5. It has to be a .22 or they'll develop a flinch and never want to go shooting again.

    11 vote(s)
    8.4%
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  1. jrod

    jrod Member

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    If you are serious about "really" learning to shoot get a quality .22.
    When I go to a public range theses days, it seems that all anyone does anymore is put holes all over a B-27 at 10 feet and call it good. what happened to shooting groups at 25 yards?
     
  2. huntsman

    huntsman Member

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    s&w 6906
     
  3. redbullitt

    redbullitt Member

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    I think either the heavy weighted 38 or full size 9mm will do just fine in most cased.

    That p100 may feel "too big" though depending on who is shooting it, so that may be a consideration.

    Personally I give a slight nod to the revolver from what I have seen with new people I have dealt with. There is simply less going on and less to worry about with malfunctions, slide manipulation etc.
     
  4. Delford

    Delford Member

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    I like the SP101 even though I can shoot the GP100 pretty well also. If I were starting over again I'd still buy a semi auto. They just seem more comfortable in my hand and I like the magazine changeout over a speed loader.
    My daughter is a new shooter and she likes the LCR. She has some training to do before she makes a decision but it will be her decision based on what fits her hand and how she hits what she aims at.
     
  5. Kennydale

    Kennydale Member

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    My first handgun was a Ruger SR40C. When I finally got some good training i went to a full size 9mm (Glock G17) I have been carry it AIWB for the last 10 months. Best firearm I ever owned !
     
  6. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    Most of the people I meet are in my martial arts class, so hopefully they'll have strong wrists.

    I find it interesting that the early votes were nearly unanimously for the 9 or for "either", but now the GP100 is dead even with the rest.
     
  7. TTv2

    TTv2 Member

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    .38 in a revolver. With an automatic they're more likely to want to shoot fast, a revolver will slow them down.

    Once they get the fundamentals of aiming and trigger pull down, then move them to the 9 pistol so they can get a feel for the recoil and the changing of a magazine.

    first handgun I ever shot was a S&W model 10.
     
  8. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Voted "Both are good options". I use to start out beginning shooters, once they had mastered a Ruger Mk.I .22, with a Star Model B in 9mm. (essentially a slightly scaled down version of a 1911). Everyone who used the Star did great with it; no problems with it's operation or recoil. You could also do well with new shooters using a GP100 loaded with .38 target wadcutter loads. Next to no recoil in a full size gun and very easy to control with the option of shooting either single action or double action.
     
  9. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Kinda depends on the someone.

    Years ago, I would have said the revolver. Today, however, there are so many different 9mm pistols of different sizes, actions, and configurations, and so many options when it comes to ammo, that I'd have no issues offering one up to the new shooter.

    I chose not to vote in the poll because of the lack of definition of "someone."
     
  10. WYO

    WYO Member

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    Whichever fits better, assuming the shooter can handle the manual of arms if it is a semi-auto.
     
  11. jstert

    jstert Member

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    357/38 revolver. no mag to lose. no slide to rack. single or double action trigger. 2, 3, or 4" barrel for ccw, anything, nightstand, respectively. heavier steel for softer shooting, lighter alloy for easier ccw. eats anything. load with snakeshot, wadcutters, up to 357 to stop most any slithering, 2 or 4 legged predator in lower 48.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  12. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    Please note I'm not asking what gun a first-time gun owner should buy.

    I'm asking what would be a good gun for me to use to take them shooting for the first time.
     
  13. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    It's important to note also that just because a revolver might be a good starter weapon, doesn't mean the person learning has any interest in revolvers.

    My girlfriend cares not at all about revolvers, but got a little warm under the collar when she handled my VP9.

    The opposite can be true too. But I like all kinds of guns, so I have my bases covered for good learner guns because they are guns I like having in my collection. (i.e. duty sized guns)
     
  14. Milt1

    Milt1 Member

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    I'm going to get push back on this but I think it's foolish and reckless to start any newbie to shooting with a semi-auto regardless of caliber. The expectation that the newbie will have is that this is what they should buy. Most people don't have access to a range and with a semi-auto, practice and plenty of it is vital. I can just see a newbie that hadn't fired their semi-auto for a long period of time dropping the mag and thinking the pistol is now safe. "Oops forgot to check the chamber, hope no one gets hurt". This situation is compounded if the semi-auto doesn't have a manual safety.

    Why would you want to put a newbie in harms way when a revolver would serve the same purpose? You can criticize me if you want (don't really care) but that's my response and I'm sticking with it.
     
  15. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    The military and LE don't "start people out" with anything but a standard issue duty weapon. Depending on the student, DA triggers on handguns like revolvers or autos like a M9 can be difficult to use for an extended perios, and managing that DA shot is a major "first hurdle" to work through. During this learning period, if the student doesn't rapidly improve, it may result in that student becoming more fatigued and discouraged, which may compound into a reduced level of confidence. Personally, I will allow a brand new handgun shooter to initially use a .22, just to get used to the "idea" of firing a handgun. Just some simple grouping at short range, and maybe 1 or 2 very basic drills. This is only for a 3-4 of magazines, and I will often have the shooter fire the 22 "orientation tables" with a suppressor attached for the first half, then without for the second half, then move on to the center fire handgun.
     
  16. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    I don't start them with a firearm at all. We start at the kitchen table with a discussion of the four safety rules and a Nerf gun. Once they have learned the rules, we move on to exploring different firearms.
     
  17. jrod

    jrod Member

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    Outstanding! Keep up the good work Teachu2!
     
  18. bluestarlizzard

    bluestarlizzard Member

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    To those who keep bringing up preferences of the person being taught to shoot,

    Yeah, I don't care what they think is "cool" or what not. If someone asks me to teach them to shoot a gun, I'm going to teach them to shoot. If they want to shoot a specific gun, then they can learn to shoot and then I will let them shoot the specific gun or type of gun they want to shoot.

    I think it's a mistake to let the student choose in this manner. The teacher needs to be the one teaching, not catering to some preferences of someone who doesn't have a clue about what they need to learn and what is required of them.
     
  19. Jim NE

    Jim NE Member

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    Revolvers, to my mind, are more intuitive. Meaning, once somebody knows how to use and shoot a DA revolver, they can pretty much shoot any DA revolver. Not that much difference, at least in the DA type.

    Semi-autos, on the other hand, can come a wide variety of configurations...and the configurations of (and differences between) semi autos won't necessarily be obvious to the inexperienced shooter just by looking at the gun. For that reason, some people like to start new shooters out on DA revolvers. Of course, revos don't have safeties, so....

    I guess it just depends on the shooter. And their ultimate intended use for the gun. Both can be a viable option.
     
  20. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    Another thing I'm considering is that my M&P 9c, while it will have more recoil than a M&P 9 full-size, won't be that much worse. On the other hand, my LCR will have a significant difference from a GP100.

    GP100 + M&P9c is better than M&P 9 + LCR if I want to give both options.
     
  21. RugerBob

    RugerBob Member

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    Please note I'm not asking what gun a first-time gun owner should buy.

    Maybe other people who show 1st timers to the range have more options.
    Many don't know guns at all and only go by what they hear. Multiple guns in multiple calibers and actions. Its great your willing to take time to show people. +1 on that.
     
  22. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    With range loads (WWB and similar) it's hard to tell the difference in recoil between a M&P 9 and a 9c. My wife shot both back-to-back, and preferred the balance of the 9c. The width and contour of the M&P grip really spreads the force well. My wife actually shoots Glocks a tad more accurately than M&Ps, but hates the grip.
     
  23. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    One other thing I've started doing is getting .22 conversions. I have a Kimber for a Series 70 1911, a Advantage Arms for a G17/34, and a Kadet for the CZ75s. In true .22lr handguns, I have a Ruger 22/45 scoped, a S&W 34 steel snubbie, and a Browning 1911/22. Several rifles in bolt, semi, pump, and lever.

    I don't hesitate to use semiauto firearms with beginners. I just Barney Fife them until they are comfortable - one bullet, fire, reload.
     
  24. jstert

    jstert Member

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    if this is the underlying question then no 38 and no 9mm to start imho. i teach absolute newbies with a single action 22 revolver by ruger or heritage. safety, trigger control, stance, manual of arms all practiced at a slower, by the numbers, more controlled pace. if they are still interested i move up to a larger piece, which is usually a revolver since my collection is focused on wheelguns.
     
  25. TreeDoc

    TreeDoc Member

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    I have introduced many a child and women to shooting with the lowly .22 and a coffee can. Single six or a mark, usually the mark. My theroy is I want their 1st experience to be fun and build confidence. The coffee can does some of first and a lot of the second. A 1 pound coffee can is an easy target at 15 feet.
    First 10 rounds, they expireince the 'bang', can moves around with each shot. I've never taken some one out to shoot like this and after the last shot not have them turn around with a smile.
    And that is what 'hooks' them. From there targets get further away, smaller, but always reactive. They'll slow down on their own. They realize it takes time and aiming to hit the golfball, shotgun hull or skoal can at 20 yards.
    Just re read the OP question, I guess a 38 wadcutter in a GP.
     
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