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Big shout out to Kimber this afternoon: Kimber K6s Revolver

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by whatnickname, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. whatnickname

    whatnickname Member

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    Amazing and bad for business too. Most people that buy Kimbers aren’t beginners.
     
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  2. Texas10mm

    Texas10mm Member

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    Fixed it for you. None of the experienced shooters I know own one. Collectively the group of shooter I hang out with own almost 100 1911 pistols.
     
  3. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    I disagree-at least sort of. Where steel/alloy rubs against each other as they move (as where the yoke meets the frame in a revolver) or where parts are in transit from one area to another (as when the ejector rod moves within the cylinder), a drop of oil in the appropriate area will provide lubrication to the affected parts enough to outlast your great-great grandchildren.
     
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  4. mnrivrat

    mnrivrat Member

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    "The steel is hardened and that provides enough lubricity to the parts to out last your great grandchildren."
    Never heard of hardening steel to achieve lubrication , by purpose or accident. It stands to reason that harder surfaces would perhaps give less wear, but not necessarily less friction . You will have to explain that one further for me.

    Mean while I will properly lube my guns.
     
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  5. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    Like the gun. But I think the OP is going over board on the Customer Service Rep. Was she rude, did not offer help etc. That would be different. I am confused. Did you think she was technical support? I have talked to many CS reps from other manufactures over the years and most are pleasant and do their best or send over to Tech assistant. To know every part of all the different firearms and manuals is unreasonable for her position and the smarmy comment about the ladies room does not say much about the Op as a Gentleman especially using her name. Maybe she was new. Every been new on a job? I think he could have handled this better.
    I also wonder if there are instructional video's etc. on cleaning etc. available on line. I know Ruger has them. I would have done some research before even calling CS.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  6. Bottom Gun

    Bottom Gun Member

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    My experience was more positive.
    I spoke with Dawn a couple of months ago regarding having some fiber optic sights installed on one of my 1911 slides.
    She was very helpful, called me back with answers to questions she wasn’t able to answer at the time and followed up with email. She made sure I got exactly what I wanted and overall was a very pleasant person to deal with.
    I kept Dawn’s email address in case I need to contact Kimber in the future since I was very pleased with her efforts and the service.
     
  7. whatnickname

    whatnickname Member

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    When I call a manufacturer with a very basic and legitimate question and end up with a customer service representative on the phone that 1) does not know firearms from doorknobs and 2) basically blows me off they're gonna get called out for it. And I frankly don't care who takes issue with my calling her out by name. But I'll end my reply with the way that "Dawn" ended our conversation: Have a nice day. Sounds kind of dismissive doesn't it?
     
  8. kheeka

    kheeka Member

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    Are you serious?
     
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  9. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    It does a bit, but I'm sure they are trained to end each call with well wishes to the customer, and I'm not sure how else she would end the call other than adding "Sorry we couldn't be of more help."

    Keep in mind you were already miffed, so anything she might have said may have gotten on your nerves.
     
  10. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    Most experienced gun owners I know have an idea where the firearm needs to be lubed. If unsure of the exact points, direct that question at a gunsmith. I would bet the majority would tell to minimize the use of lubricants because they are an attractant to dirt and grime. If you use Hoppes 90 or similar product for cleaning...remember that they are petroleum based and should provide for the majority of lubrication.
     
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  11. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    I wonder what her side of the story is?? Maybe she was wishing you a nice day for another reason. "Like when you called her out on it." Have a nice day.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
  12. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Grease? That could be a huge issue in winter weather.
     
  13. Rodentman

    Rodentman Member

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    I really would like to know if accessing and lubing the lock-work is a recommended practice in the proper cleaning and maintenance of a revolver. I HAVE removed the "trigger mechanism" from my 1976 Ruger Service Six. I never saw any dirt or anything that required cleaning or removal. IIRC I lightly oiled the mechanism. I have never removed a side plate from an S&W or any other revolver. I doubt that would be a suggested practice as most folks probably don't even have the proper screwdrivers. I do, but frankly am reluctant to mess with stuff I don't understand.
     
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  14. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    I’m not a fan of removing side plates. My nightmare of having small springs or pieces go “pling!” and be lost forever, is too real.
     
  15. Rodentman

    Rodentman Member

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    My thoughts exactly. I know there are many people who routinely totally strip firearms, but I access only the areas needed to be cleaned. I've never read any manual saying that full disassembly is required or recommended. Now sometimes with semi-autos I will remove the firing pin and extractor but that's as far as I go.
     
  16. Texas10mm

    Texas10mm Member

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    I routinely strip 1911s and my S&W 5906 to the frame. At least once a year anyway.
     
  17. tipoc

    tipoc Member

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    The job of most customer service reps is to answer the common questions like: Where do I send my gun to for repair? Is my warranty still valid? How do I apply for a job? I got a delivery to make where do I pull in and who signs for it? Things like that. Also they direct a person who has a question to the people who can answer the question. They rarely know the answer themselves. Their job is to be customer service reps. They are not amateur gunsmiths.

    If the OP had asked to speak to the service dept. to ask the question on removing the side plate to clean and lube the gun maybe he would have had different results. Maybe not. But it would have been easier and more informed than expecting the customer service rep to know.

    I also can't recall any revolver manual that advised or instructed on how to remove the side plate and lube the internals. Every manual I've seen advises against it, says plainly not to do it, tells you not to go further than the regular lube. If you need to, contact the manufacturer they say. That's just what the Kimber manual says.

    See page 44.
    https://www.kimberamerica.com/media/wysiwyg/manual-download/KimberRevolverManual_FEB17.pdf

    I once Asked a customer service rep what they used on oiling a certain gun and the kid told me Aunt Jemima's pancake syrup. "What do I know", he said, "I major in the history of modern dance and I work here part time. Want to speak to the fellas that know that?"

    I'm always polite to those folks. They pay them nothing and they are worth every penny. But I've had jobs like that so i give no worker a hard time.
     
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  18. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    Tell me about it. Just lost a tiny spring on another gun that is going to cost me $15.00 to replace with shipping. Already have spent a hour looking for it. And it will turn up. About 6 months later.
     
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  19. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    After you step on it.
     
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  20. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    I would take a guess to say there there are a few knowledgeable revolver guys on this very forum and even a few that might own a Kimber K6 that could have helped with any questions. Especially something like lubrication. Personally, I would not want to be in a customer service job for all the Whiskey in Ireland. Dealing with the Public is for the pits. I bet every 10th call is some jerk just waiting to wail on them.
     
  21. BlueHeelerFl

    BlueHeelerFl Member

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    I used to do that for a for a living and it could be a pain.

    Trying to explain to explain to the average person why they are having a problem with their computer using our website was like pulling teeth.

    I personally enjoyed the people that would keep calling and get every employee in the office in hopes of someone messing up and giving the wrong answer.
     
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  22. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Boots are made for walking-and also serve as a small parts finder. Bare feet work even better; especially if the small part you're searching for is sharp.
     
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  23. sgt127

    sgt127 Member

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    Quoted for truth. Raised two boys. I assure you, a Lego block has never been lost in my house that was not located by my bare feet.
     
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  24. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    Lol, even had my metal detector on the prowl. Parts have their own version of the Bermuda Triangle.
     
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