Quantcast

bluing 90% gone ??

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by old fart, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. old fart

    old fart Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    434
    Location:
    kentucky
    my older 2003 model 60 marlin has bluing thats almost gone from the barrel. i am worried about rust issues as i hunt in the rain. i have tried cold blue and it just won't stay. my idea is to use paint, what type paint would work thats also resistant to oils, or some other methods. the mag tube is still nice and blue so i will be wiping it down with oil and oil will be getting on the barrel. i can't afford to have it redone by a gunsmith, thanks for any help and idea's ya'll can give me.
     
    NIGHTLORD40K likes this.
  2. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    6,667
    Location:
    Florida
  3. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,605
    I have used barbecue paint on inexpensive guns with success. I can't see spending money on rebluing a Marlin 60.
     
    Slamfire likes this.
  4. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    9,710
    Location:
    Alabama
    Not certain what the exact composition was, but the Brits used a black paint. I was unable to find an exact copy of the color, but I have gleefully sprayed black paint over the worn spots on my Lee Enfields.

    I also regularly use spray paint on gardening tools, such as shovels, hoes, machetes. If you are really worried about durability, spray a light coat of primer on the metal and then apply spray paint. Do remove oils from the surface before painting. Walmart sells a Krylon Ultra Black spray paint, it works well, very dark.

    I am of the opinion that paint is an excellent rust preventive finish. Based on the lack of rust on tools in the shed, steel under paint is well protected. If it wears off, I spray paint back on. People are going to hate me for saying this, but bluing is not a good rust preventing finish. It is on firearms because 1) it is pretty, and 2) it is what we are used to. I really like the parkerizing on US military arms, it is a durable and rust preventing finish.

    I just tried to contact Texas Armament Co. in Blanket, TX. They had a nice black parkerization and were reasonable. But, the phone number no longer works. However with a bit of searching, you might find someone who could do parkerzation for under $200.00
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
    Bfh_auto and LoonWulf like this.
  5. Pat Riot

    Pat Riot Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Messages:
    934
    LoonWulf, Slamfire and NIGHTLORD40K like this.
  6. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Messages:
    3,939
    Location:
    Nostramo (in absentia), Segmentum Ultima
    Bluing provides little to no corrosion protection, it is 99% cosmetic. If that is your only concern, just keep the metal bits coated with CLP, RIG, Remoil or the like. I personally like 100% silicone spray. Spray on, wipe off before shooting, reapply after.

    The reason your cold blue wont stick is likely because you have not got all of the oil residue off the metal beforehand. I have had success with regular Birchwood Casey cold blues on Marlin barrels. I use automotive brake parts cleaner and the BC metal prep chemicals that come in the kit. Once you think you have the metal degreased- clean it again. Wear disposable rubber gloves and change them after cleaning and before bluing. Rinse and THOUROUGHLY dry the part to be blued between each blue application. Buff with fine CLEAN steel wool between each blue application.

    The same prep routine applies for spray paint. It will not stick if the meatal parts arent 100% oil free and clean. Oils like to hide in the nooks and crannys of small parts and leach out as you are trying to blue (or paint) your parts. Therefore if you really want to do it right, dissasembly is required.

    Of course, all this is for looks. If rust is your concern, buff surface rust with steel wool, wipe and clean off and just keep the metal bits coated with one of the above products.
     
  7. OARNGESI

    OARNGESI Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,095
    Engine paint $4 a can available all over heat oil will never be a issue
     
  8. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Messages:
    5,497
    Location:
    SE GA
    Bluing has little rust preventative properties on its own. However, the presence of some hydrophobic medium otherwise known as water displacing oil, or gun oil, work well together.

    Bluing and oil combined work much better than oil or bluing alone.
     
    Skylerbone and Slamfire like this.
  9. shoobe01

    shoobe01 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    838
    Location:
    Kansas City
    As many have said, paint. But be very scrupulous about prep (degrease, then do it again!), mask off anything you don't want painted, and let it cure. Not dry, cure. If you don't even touch it for a week or two, almost any paint is impossibly hard and very ready for being rained on in the field. No desperate need for any special paint, just plain old spray paint will be very resistant to damage.
     
    NIGHTLORD40K likes this.
  10. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,516
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I shoot duracoat, have used cerracoat,and cerramacoat, and unless your investing in the equipment.
    I think Brownells alumahyde is probably a better option. Only got my hands on one can of that stuff but for a rattle can option it's probably the best.

    I also like just plain old krylon, duplicolor, or any other spray paint.
    The VHT paints and engine enamal/epoxys the auto parts store sell is a little more chemical resistant, but most are good enough unless you soak your barrels in oil.

    Again, and imo, surface prep is more important that product used, as long as it is applicable to the job being done.
     
    NIGHTLORD40K likes this.
  11. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4,773
    Location:
    Hawkeye East
    If you like it blued then Oxpho Blue, again with prep work followed by kerosene. Buy a can of RIG+P and a RIG RAG and keep it coated. Done correctly and kept coated it will look as good as new for decades to come. I’ve cold blued many small parts and several full rifles that were long devoid of any finish save orange/brown rust that still look fine.

    It looks don’t matter as much then the above mentioned Aluma Hyde works great.

    Both of these rifles had a combination of bare steel, freckles, and surface rust before Oxpho. Not great pics but you get the idea.
    79D731FF-73CE-427D-895B-5DA169D0033A.jpeg


    0B660010-49D9-4E6A-B73F-9304083473CD.jpeg
     
  12. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    9,137
    Wipe it down with Eezox and the blueless metal won't rust.
     
    IndianaBoy likes this.
  13. edwardware

    edwardware Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Messages:
    1,675
    I've been impressed with caliper or engine paint (from O'Reilly's, et al). It's not as performant as specialty coatings, but it's cheap and pretty durable.
     
  14. AK103K

    AK103K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    6,163
    Pretty much any paint will work. Ive used Testors model paints for years, and it works great and they come in pretty much any color you need if you want a camo job.

    I stripped the paint off a shotgun that had been painted for over 25 years and used pretty heavily in that time, and the finish underneath looked like the day it was painted. No hint of rust, and no wear, where the paint covered things. If you allow the paint to wear off at the wear points, you do lose the protection. Easily touched up though.

    Ive used Aluma Hyde II on a couple of guns. It works well, but you need to follow the instructions to the letter. Also, if you change your mind later, youre going to need a bead blast to get it off. Things like Testors and Krylon (not sure about Krylon Fusion on plastics though), will come off fairly easy with solvents.

    When applied right, Aluma Hyde II looks more like a finish than a paint. Ive done a couple of early SAR1 AK imports, that were pretty rough finish wise with it, and they came out looking great.

    The other thing you can use it for is a base. Ive done that with a couple of cammo jobs. AHII as the base, and Testors on top. The Testors came off later, and the AHII stayed and showed no real damage from the removal.

    If you paint with any of them, prep is the key. Degrease everything well, including your hands, and have things set up beforehand (how you plan on hanging, handling the gun, etc), and youll have a better experience doing it.

    Brownells has a couple of videos on painting things and using their paints. Lots of good info there, even if you arent using their paints.

    If you want the gun to look like it came from the factory, Id use the Aluma Hyde, or one of those type paints. If you want to cammie the gun for hunting, Id go with something like Testors or Krylon, etc,.

    This is a Testors/Krylon job.....

    New.....
    enhance.jpg

    Over the pattern its trying to mimic...
    enhance.jpg


    About 10 years of pretty constant use....


    enhance.jpg
    enhance.jpg
     
    Demi-human, NIGHTLORD40K and drband like this.
  15. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,695
    I like Brownells gunkote. Heat cure. Am not hard on my stuff. Got an 1100 magnum that looks good after a few yrs of hunting.
     
  16. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,695
    OP could go w reg spray paint and then shoot clear over it.
     
  17. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,695
    I did a mag wheel......etching primer then wheel paint

    Let it cure a while. Changed my mind about doing all my jeep wheels. PITA getting that off my test wheel LOL.

    Best paint job I ever got......figures.
     
  18. P5 Guy

    P5 Guy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,704
    Location:
    Tampa Bay area


    Try your hand at hydrodip?
     
  19. crestoncowboy

    crestoncowboy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    984
    I krylon camoed a savage (64 maybe) that I won on a punchboard around 2000. It has hung in a barn and killed varmints since then and still looks the same. Just degrease well to get all the oil off.
     
  20. AK103K

    AK103K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    6,163
    Ive done this in the past. You just have to watch that you use the same type paint over coat.

    I used to use Testors clear coat, which is a lacquer. Their Military Flats are enamel. The two dont mix well. If you go with light coats of the lacquer, you might be OK. But if your not careful, and get a little heavy handed, and/or do it too soon, the enamel wont cure, and paint job ends up "sticky".
     
    P5 Guy likes this.
  21. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,695
    Painters Choice matte clear is what I used over Rustoleum camo spray paint. I just did the stock though.
    I did have an 1100 SP (they parkerized) that had staining and did the degrease and paint w flat black, 3 or 4 coats of matte clear.
    It held up for a yr or so (Brownells was out of Gunkote).
    They finally got some in and I took the clear/black spray paint off and redid it w Gunkote.
    I had an old 10/22, thought about restoring it. Of course, Brownells now out of Gunkote and my little can about empty (did a couple of other projects with it).

    700 tiger.jpg
     
    AK103K likes this.
  22. Boattale

    Boattale Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    SWMO
    If you want to get that model 60 really clean before you paint/coat it, take it a toothbrush and some Dawn in a hot shower with you. I can assure you for an absolute fact that there have been a lot of USMC rifles cleaned that way for inspection.
     
    Skylerbone and NIGHTLORD40K like this.
  23. Mosin Bubba

    Mosin Bubba Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,165
    I have cold blued a lot of Mosins I was Bubba'ing and have just never been happy with the end result. Birchwood Casey looks good but just melts right off. I had it start wearing away leaving a rifle in a safe for 6 months. Oxpho Blue is a little more durable, but it's not close to a factory hot blue job.

    For a 22, it's worth giving it a shot with Oxpho Blue just for the hell of it - it's a $20 afternoon project and a learning experience. Metal prep is EVERYTHING. Degrease the barrel 2 or 3 separate times, make sure your steel wool is degreased, and get some of those blue rubber gloves. If you are not happy with the end result, then you can always just strip it later with brake cleaner then blast it with "Russian cold blue", aka BBQ paint.

    $20 and one day total; what have you got to lose. Welcome to Bubba'ing.
     
    Skylerbone likes this.
  24. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2016
    Messages:
    1,935
    Location:
    The Haymarsh, MI
    There! That, finally.

    Perfect.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder...
     
    NIGHTLORD40K and AK103K like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice