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Bolting down the safe

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Caliper_Mi, Nov 20, 2010.

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  1. Caliper_Mi

    Caliper_Mi Member

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    I am safe shopping and have found that at least some manufacturers make their fire-resistant safes such that they can only be bolted to the floor, and not to the wall. Now I can see that a wall-bolt would provide a heat path through the wall of the safe if the wall caught fire, but it seems to me that bolting to the wall would be a more secure method against theft and prevent a burglar rocking the safe to loosen the connection. I am curious to know what everyone thinks about this. Am I giving up security with floor instead of wall bolting?
     
  2. hardluk1

    hardluk1 member

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    What the diffence> I drilled 2 holes in the back and bolted it to the wall and floor. If heat tranfer is a major concern buy a tube of fire caulk and shoot it around the out side of the hole to seal any fire and place a bit over the bolt heads too.
     
  3. M1key

    M1key Member

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    Either way, or both, but bolt it down. I had an unbolted safe stolen. :fire:


    M
     
  4. browningguy

    browningguy Member

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    I believe bolted to the slab is better than to the wall. With my handy little sawzall I can be through the wall in a matter of minutes, bolted to the slab not so much. I'm not sure how the burglar is going to rock my safes, they don't budge at all.
     
  5. Freedom_fighter_in_IL

    Freedom_fighter_in_IL Member

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    Same here. I mean if there is like 6 of them they MIGHT rock mine. Bolting to the wall would actually be much easier to get loose than a floor. Like Brown said. A sawzall and 15 seconds and you can bet they will be unbolted. Mine is also bolted to a concrete slab in the basement. Suffice it to say, it's not going anywhere fast. Someone steals that bugger, they will be earning every dime of whatever they get. #1- close to 2300 pounds unloaded. #2- 2 sets of stairs. #3- Butch and Sundance (My Twin Rotties :) ) #4- Not all my weapons are in my safe and they would more than likely meet the business end of the ones that aren't :)
     
  6. wrs840

    wrs840 Member

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    What's best these days for bolting to a 4" concrete slab floor? Thunderstuds?

    Les
     
  7. Freedom_fighter_in_IL

    Freedom_fighter_in_IL Member

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    I used "lead anchors" and 5/8 all thread with double nuts inside.
     
  8. Iam2taz

    Iam2taz Member

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    Four guys could hardly get my safe in the house. (Two of those guys were college linemen.) At this point, it goes with the house when we move. No it is not bolted in, but would take several hours and at least four big guys to get it out of the house.
     
  9. Yarddog

    Yarddog Member

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    RedHeads (WeadgeHeads) 4" Will do the Trick ; )
    Y/D
     
  10. gearjammer711

    gearjammer711 Member

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    Iam2taz If you don't bolt it down, a thief can turn it on its back and get more leverage to pry it open.
     
  11. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    You can use self tapping bolts, lead hammer in anchors, epoxy anchors, there are lots of concrete anchoring systems, got to the hardware store and tell the guy you need to bolt down some iron to concrete and need something that won't ever let it move.

    Also, consider beefing up the wall, and don't mount it on an exterior wall, there are some pics where thieves just knocked a two holes in the wall, put chains around the safe and ripped it out of the house with a truck.
     
  12. 12131

    12131 Member

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    Unwarranted concern, really. Have you tried rocking a safe, filled with guns and ammo, that is bolted down on the floor?
    And, as mentioned by Freedom_fighter_in_IL, one can saw through that wall in seconds.
     
  13. hardluk1

    hardluk1 member

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    Anyone that thinks it so easy to cut loose from a waii has no carpentry experience. Bolt it to everthing you can. The longer it takes to get out the more chance they have of getting caught or running out of time or supplies. 4- 3 1/2" or 4" wedge anchores or red heads or the most common and easyist to use along with drilling some holes along near the top /rear of the safe at each stud and screw to the wall studs or if lucky like me to a poured concrete block wall. It might take a half hour to cut loose from the wall and have to deal with not just the studs but the sheetrock that tends to dull a sawsall blade like right now but the bottom plates and wires that more than likly run in it. Don't think the bolt holes in the bottom can't be delt with. They are close enough to the edges that a long steel cuting blade in a sawsall will get to them too. So again drill a couple holes in the center bottom area and bolt there too. If someone wants it bad enough and can think clearly they will get the best out.
     
  14. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Member

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    If you can afford it, get a smaller decoy safe, fill it partway with bricks or cement, then when cured a few handfuls of forks from the Thrift store, keep it somewhere more obvious.

    My basement floods, so my small safe is mounted to wood, but it's still really just there to deter the ones in a hurry.

    If someone REALLY wants your safe, and you aren't there to stop them, they'll roll it out on steel shot if they have to.
     
  15. ZCORR Jay

    ZCORR Jay Member

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    I'm not a builder but I would prefer to bolt to the floor as mentioned before... a sawzall can do a number on the wall and fast.

    You could always just hook up some electricity to it and give the thief a surprise shock.
    I'm not being serious about the electric shock idea by the way.
     
  16. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    you don't have to be a builder,
    you can go to a local lumber yard, or box store like Home Depot, and rent a large drill (just tell them what you are doing) and in an after noon, you can drill as many holes as you like to tie her down nice and snug.
     
  17. CB900F

    CB900F Member

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    Fella's;

    If the unit(s) in question don't meet the U.L. 1 hour fire rating, don't get too concerned with esoteric matters of conduction paths. Most of the RSC's being sold these days are not going to provide protection against a fully involved house fire with or without wall anchors. My personal opinion is that if you feel the need to drill the wall of the RSC & bolt it to the studs, go ahead & do it as long as you bolt the thing to the floor too.

    Most U.L. rated safes will have a floor bolt down, usually in the center. Those, you don't want to go drilling the walls for bolt holes. There's no need if you use the floor point and you don't want to compromise the walls in any way.

    900F
     
  18. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    If your burglar has a saw to cut your safe out of the wall, he also has a saw that would cut into your safe.

    I wouldn't be that concerned about it.
     
  19. Freedom_fighter_in_IL

    Freedom_fighter_in_IL Member

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    LOL, now that was just plain funny right there. a1, if they are carrying a saw that could cut through my safe, more power to them for being able to lug the thing around. There is a HUGE difference between heavy gauge steel with firecreate in the middle and then heavy gauge on the inside and a drywall and stud wall. I mean one of them little tin boxes you get at Walmart or Dicks yeah maybe so. But not a safe such as the Cannon sitting in my Basement. 90 minute fire rated at 1200*. I don't believe anyone is getting into that bad boy with some tonka toy saw.
     
  20. Jed Carter

    Jed Carter Member

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    Safe bolted to concrete floor in basement, thieves took a steel cable or chain around safe. Using a truck or tractor, pulled the safe end to end of house, up stairway and through brick wall and rear doorway. Saying major damage just does not do it justice. The average to good safes will deter the smash and grap type thief, But a determined and equiped thief or one that has a lot of time, the safe is just an anoyance. That safe being pulled out of a house by a truck, happened in a rural area, no one to see or hear.
    1. Hide and bolt down safe, do not put in common areas of home.
    2. Tell no one about the safe, not your best friend, you don't know to whom they talk.
    3. Get a security system, or have a nosey neighbor close by, preferably both.
    4. Spend $, get the biggest thickest heaviest hunk O'steel you can afford.
    5. Lie to friends etc that know you have a lot of guns, tell them you rent a storage unit.
    6. Rent a storage unit.
     
  21. btg3

    btg3 Member

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    ^wow^

    Don't neglect insurance. Some home owner policies go up to $5,000 for firearms. Above that, a rider is needed.
     
  22. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    You all know that you can place your safe in a closet that has extra fireproofing done to it. Sheet rock is all that is used these days. For real security, the only way to go is to bolt to concrete. I have no concrete except in my garage and I am not placing a safe in my garage which my wife often leaves the door open, sometimes over night. In a real fire, you can forget about your safe and the contents unless you place it in a room that has concrete surrounding it and will support the weight of the house as it falls downward on top of the gun storage area. Rooms like this will often have a moisture problem also.
     
  23. heeler

    heeler Member

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    Freedom fighter,I recently viewed a Ft.Knox safe on another firearms forum that got opened up with a 120 volt sawzall.
    Think about it.
     
  24. CB900F

    CB900F Member

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    22-rimfire;

    Your statements are pretty much true regarding RSC's. But, nowhere near accurate regarding true safes.

    900F
     
  25. Freedom_fighter_in_IL

    Freedom_fighter_in_IL Member

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    How many blades and how much time to do it? I know with my old Cannon safe, I lost the combination to it (was new and the wife had a bad habit of moving ANYTHING I sat anywhere). Locksmith got there, said oh hell no, call the company you bought that from. I don't see anyone getting into mine without some serious tools and a lot of time.
     
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