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BP Guns in Canada question

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Foto Joe, Jan 8, 2011.

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  1. Foto Joe

    Foto Joe Member

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    Currently we are working the winter away in Arizona, but my wife brought our passports with us and when I questioned why fearing it meant Mexico, she informed me that she wants to return to Wyoming via Canada. Not a bad idea me thinks, until I realize how many guns I have with me that is.

    I will be having our son-in-law drive one of our trucks back to Wyoming this spring and with he will carry my cartridge guns back because I know that there is no way I'm taking those into Canada. But....

    May I as a U.S. citizen take a Black Powder firearm legally into Canada?? I'm sure if I can there is going to be some paperwork involved. If I can't I'll just send them back with the rest of my toys.

    Help or advice is appreciated.
     
  2. RSVP2RIP

    RSVP2RIP Member

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    I visit canada every year to hunt and yes you can bring firearms into the country. There is a form you have to have filled out in advance, 3 guns per form one continuance sheet is allowed which also has room for 3 guns. You must first be familiar with canada firearms laws though. No guns with a barrel length under 18 inches is allowed unless you have a special permit which would take an act of parliament to get for a nonresident/landed imigrant. No handguns whatsoever! Doesn't matter if is blackpowder or an airgun. All blackpowderguns are allowed even my Savage M10ML II is fine. If the guns isn't serialized it's OK. I took a custome one that didn't have a number on it and only got mildly hasseled about it. You have to understand Canadians don't have the same personal liberties we enjoy in the US and just like in the US, the officers in charge may not know the gun laws.

    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/form-formulaire/num-nom/909-eng.htm

    Have the form filled out in triplicate and signed before you get there. And personally, I would fill in a legitamate reason for bringing guns into the country other than "travel" or "personal protection". I always put hunting, because thats what I'm doing with them, but out of hunting season that might look odd.

    You can call the Chief Firearms Officer with questions. I have before and they (the one in Ontario anyways) are very good at calling you back quickly. A link with a list of numbers is below

    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/cfo-caf/cfo-caf-eng.htm
     
  3. Foto Joe

    Foto Joe Member

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    You kind of confused me on this one. I'm not familiar with a Savage M10ML II. "No handuns whatsoever!", does this include Black Powder handguns?? I think the answer is "just send everything home with your son-in-law and skip the hassle".

    My other problem of course, is if I do find a way to legally take some BP guns into Canada, getting back into the U.S.A. past our illustrious border protectors could cause me more issues than I want to think about.
     
  4. RSVP2RIP

    RSVP2RIP Member

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    The Savage is a muzzleloading rifle that uses smokeless powder. No handguns includes blackpowder handguns and even airsoft handguns. You can't even have a replica of a gun that used a dummy reciever. Bringing the guns back into the country is no porblem as long as you can legally own them here. Sometimes they want to see your Canada Firearms Declaration just to make sure you didn't pick up any extra ones there. But in short the answer is you might not want to deal with the Canadian firearms fiasco and have your son-in-law handel them all. Each form cost $25 to have entered into their system. You are also only allowed to have 500 rounds of ammunition. I think if you are over that they will charge you duty, but it wouldn't suprize me if they took anything over 500 or told you to turn around and go back. The camp where we hunt had a bunch of people turned around at the border for having a DUI arrest on their record from 25 years ago! I was arrested for a minor thing that was dissmissed at court, suffice to say it involved a knife and an "over zelous" police officer. The Canadian border guard took me into the "interogation room" and asked me to tell him the whole story as he ran my record and it came up that I was arrested for Unlawful Use of a Weapon. He probably saw it was dissmissed also but had to make a desision about letting a "violent criminal" into his province:cuss:. Needless to say I had the record expunged as soon as I got home. The Canadian border is kinda tough to get pass without having a gun and it might be best that if you really don't need a gun there (or pepper spray or a cudgel or a taser, pocket knife ok), don't bring one if you want to get through.
     
  5. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Up here any repro handgun, even if it is a C&B black powder one, is considered as a restricted firearm. As such I believe you would need to have some significant paper work in place and be going to a specific shooting event. We, and you, are not allowed to travel with our guns without the right paper work. For us it's a Long Term Authourity To Transport or LTATT. For you, not being a Candian citizen or holding the proper PAL and LTATT and because you're not going to a specific shooting match and return via the same or nearly the same border crossing, it would mean having your guns confiscated at the border by Canadian Customs. Returning them would likely be problematic. So it's best to send them home with your other toys.
     
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