Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Browning Hi Power Chrome

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Hotshot10, Aug 1, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Hotshot10

    Hotshot10 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Messages:
    186
    After shooting at a range a fair distance away, I stopped at a LGS that I had not been in previously. I noticed a used Browning Hi Power .40 S&W with chrome plating that looked to be in good condition. I'd never seen a chrome one before, so it interested me despite the awkward grips (I think they were original).

    The store wanted $605. I have two questions: first, is this a good deal? I've done some searching, but really all I found was that they were manufactured in the 80s and that they're not too common. I know there's someone here that will know more.

    Second, what should I look for to ensure it's a quality used gun? I'm not familiar with centerfire autoloaders, and I usually buy new.
     
  2. Hotshot10

    Hotshot10 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Messages:
    186
    By the way, I'm about 99 percent sure it was made in Belgium. I don't know if that makes a difference.
     
  3. Vonderek

    Vonderek Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,427
    Disregard my post. After writing it I realize it didn't answer your questions
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012
  4. browningguy

    browningguy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    4,578
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    The factory hard chrome usually has a matte type finish, although back in the day Browning would make just about anything someone ordered. If it's an early MkIII that price is not unreasonable. Just check the normal things, wear/pitting in the barrel, smooth sliding action. The .40's springs are heavy, it will be a lot easier if you cock the pistol before racking the slide. Check to see if it has the magazine disconnect in it (if you can pull the trigger with the magazine out it doesn't have one), it's not really an issue either way but you want to know.

    These are both MkIII's in .40, the one on the right has a factory matte chrome frame and black coated slide (it was called the Practical model). The grips are by Esmerelda.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  5. surjimmy

    surjimmy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,187
    These were done by Austin Behlert. I would say for the price it's a good deal.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. the_skunk

    the_skunk Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    136
    $600 isn't a bad price but the .40 cal are cheaper for some reason
     
  7. sub-moa

    sub-moa Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    South Florida, A Third World Country with Modern C
    Short answer Hotshot: If in decent condition, $600 is a decent price, better if it includes the grey plastic box and spare magazine. The .40 went into regular production in 1993, they were discontinued from regular production just a few years ago. All .40 BHPs were "Made in Belgium/Assembled in Portugal" whether marked as such or not. All regular production .40s were built on the cast MkIII frame with all the typical MkIII features, and with a beefed-up, wider slide and a 3 lug barrel. Factory chrome BHPs were identified by FN as "Silver Chrome", are matte and could be had with either fixed or adjustable sights...both of which were dovetailed front and rear.

    As far as what to look for; basically, excessive parts wear, especially look for rounding of the barrel locking lugs and rounding of the corresponding recesses in the slide.

    BTW, MkIIs were only produced in 9mmP, they have specific MkII features, matte finish, slide rib-integral front sight, wide-notch rear sight, ambi safety, straight feedramp, yadayadayada...several of which were continued in the MkIII and they were only manufactured from 1981 through 1989. Standard Vigilante and Sport Model BHPs were produced concurrent with the MkIIs. The first MkIIIs were also produced concurrent with the last of the MkIIs. The .40 BHP uses the same exact 32# Main/Hammer spring as concurrent 9mmP BHPs. The .40 does use a 20# Recoil Spring vs. the 17# Recoil Spring of the 9mmP.

    Nice grips on your MkIII and Practical Browning Guy ;):D
     
  8. dogtown tom

    dogtown tom Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Messages:
    4,301
    Location:
    Plano, Texas
    Don't forget the "drain hole" at the muzzle end of the slide.

    (and not all MkII's have the ambi safety....the early ones still had the old style small safety....like mine :D )
     
  9. sub-moa

    sub-moa Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    South Florida, A Third World Country with Modern C
    Quote: sub-moa...
    "BTW, MkIIs were only produced in 9mmP, they have specific MkII features, matte finish, slide rib-integral front sight, wide-notch rear sight, ambi safety, straight feedramp, yadayadayada..."

    WADR Tom...kind of thought the "yadayadayada" would cover the drain hole, plastic contoured grips...even the early-mid production roll pin trigger pins and mid-late production FPS also introduced with the MkII ;):D. The original topic of discussion was the BHP in .40 and not the MkII. MkII features were mentioned only as a gentle/indirect reference to the pair of .40s that were misidentified as MkIIs...since corrected.

    Again, WADR, as far as: "and not all MkII's have the ambi safety", while correct in the strictest sense, the ambi safety is a salient feature (identified as such by the recognized leading published BHP authorities...though granted, they aren't always perfect ;)) introduced with the very first MkIIs...and used virtually exclusively throughout MkII production. FN is infamous for producing anomalies, whether in an effort to use existing parts or as per specific end-user requirements.

    Perhaps your "early" MkII is such an anomaly or perhaps it's a relatively recent import in which the safety was armorer replaced because of the manual of arms common to the original end-user. Incidentally, my first year production MkII...bought brand new and original in every way, was factory equipped with every one of the MkII features, less the roll pin trigger pin and of course the mid-late production FPS. The other 6 MkIIs currently sitting in my safe, both FN and Browning marked, bought new and used...including final year production, only differ in the manner in which they are matte finished (grey/black/varnish), lanyard ring/not, FPS or in the case of my 1985, a matte finished barrel. :D:D:D.

    It's always good to exchange opinions on the BHP Tom, thanks!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page