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Browning Light 12 - any good?

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by rick_reno, Feb 8, 2006.

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  1. shufly

    shufly Member

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    Family legacy

    Picked up a coveted, for me A5 from a debt ($100.00). Gave the gun to my son and am interested in possibly improving. Stock is scarred and bluing is compromised. Will a new stock ($200.00) and possible new blue help or hurt the value. Gave it to him as a good way to learn about the mechanics of guns and pride in hunting successfully.
     
  2. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Not enough information.

    A new stock won't hurt the value if you keep the original. Just don't toss the old one in the fireplace. New blue often reduces the value of a collectible gun, because a collector would rather know what condition the gun is really in, and original is always more collectible.

    Fixing up a non-collectible gun that's near junk status will improve its value, though generally not enough to justify the cost of doing it for resale purposes. I.e. you have a $100 gun, and if you threw another $350 at it, you might have a $250 gun. Either way, in general, an old A5 is a gun of very limited utility by modern standards. Even a beat-up Mossberg 500 can be used for skeet, trap, goose and pheasant, if it has screw-in chokes.

    Personally, I would leave it alone. He doesn't need a restored gun to learn about shotguns. Furthermore, I don't know what your son thinks about the thing, but having been a son myself, I can hazard a guess that he won't think and feel everything his father believes he should. Save the money for the next gun he'll get. It's a field gun with a fixed choke and probably a plain barrel, and let's just say the A5 is an "acquired taste" on several levels. If someone gave it to me for free, I'd take it, but it probably wouldn't ever leave the closet until I wanted a few bucks and sold it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2010
  3. shufly

    shufly Member

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    Thanks

    Good advice. The gun is in decent shape just been handled rough. I only ask for advice if I'm prepared to take it, this time I got what I asked for - thanks.
     
  4. manifest12

    manifest12 Member

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    Browning Light 12 - made in Belgium - circa 1956.

    Serial #90---

    The barrel is stamped with * Special Steel - 12 Gauge - shells 2 3/4

    Anyone know what kind of choke it might have and if the special steel refers to the barrel or the ability to shoot steel shot?

    Thanks,
     
  5. texagun

    texagun Member

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    I have one from 1963. DO NOT shoot steel shot through that barrel. You will stand a good chance of ruining the barrel and destroying it's value. The choke markings on the barrel are as follows:

    BROWNING CHOKES AND THEIR CODES (ON REAR LEFT-SIDE OF BARREL)

    '*' designates full choke (F).

    '*-' designates improved modified choke (IM).

    '**' designates modified choke (M).

    '**-' designates improved cylinder choke (IC).

    '**$' designates skeet (SK).

    '***' designates cylinder bore (CYL).
     
  6. scchokedaddy

    scchokedaddy Member

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    A5

    Do I like A5's? Don't know if I like them, probably more like LUV them things!! I currently own light 12, 16 standard, sweet 16 and 20 Belgium, also own 2 12magnums,light 12, and sweet 16 "jap" guns. Also got a Double Auto. Deer gun is most of the time Brlgium Lighy 12, sometimes Magnum, and when the notion strikes Belgium Sweet 16. Shooting skeet 20 gauge, shoot it all day no problem{this one has weaver style chokes}. One of the magnums is for turkey shoots[ 32 inch invector plus barrel]. Use double auto for trap[this one has cutts chokes]. Sometimes depending on which course I shoot I will shoot one of the Sweet 16 for clays. Once you get used to the Browning shuffle, you won't go back. Also shoot 1148's and 48's. Love the recoil operated shotguns. Good Shooting to ya'll
     
  7. Sauer Grapes

    Sauer Grapes Member

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    Gotta luv the A-5. My father paid 212.00 w\tax in 1968. My favorite shotgun still!
     
  8. lsgibb

    lsgibb Member

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    Hey guys, some very good information here.
    My dad just passed down to me his Auto-5 shotgun that he bought used in the late 70's. I'm trying to date it but the only #'s I can find on it are on the bottom where you insert the shells in the magazine it says FN then below that it has a letter L and then below that it says 8272.
    On Browning's dating page the only thing I saw that has any L letter in the serial code were from 1954. So was this made in 1954? Also it only has one star on the barrel so I guess that means it is a full choke? Is there any way to add an improved or modified choke to it?
     
  9. hitechredneck

    hitechredneck Member

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    I was doing a search and found this thread... lots of great information... I have a question regarding the Belgium made Brownings...

    I have a Auto 5 Light 12 made in Belgium - around 1975. It was passed down to me by my father. It is still in the original box and has never been shot and I am trying to get an estimate of what its value is.

    Serial # 04865RN211

    Barrel # S49844

    Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  10. texagun

    texagun Member

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    Location:
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    I would think about $800 to $1000 around here. Blue Book of Gun Values (30th ed.) lists a 100% gun at $775 for plain barrel, $1150 with vent rib. So somewhere in that area. I would pay that for one. They are great old shotguns.
     
  11. Capstick1

    Capstick1 Member

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    The reason you can only put one shell in your Auto Five is due to the magazine disconnector being activated. On the left side of your reciever is a lever. This is the magazine disconnector. Take your finger and push this lever back in the opposite direction. This will allow you to load more than one round into your shotgun.
     
  12. Jerry68

    Jerry68 Member

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    Few things in this world are as sexy and functional as old Brownings, especially Auto 5's.

    Brownings.jpg
     
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