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BSA scopes

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by bergzilla, Oct 17, 2008.

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  1. bergzilla

    bergzilla Member

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    I just bought a BSA scope at Wal-mart for just under $20. Its designed for .22 or smaller. I want know what all other users of this brand thinks on the quality of these wally world specials.






    "I wish not hell on earth nor death on man but one will happen before ultimate peace is achieved."-me
     
  2. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    They might work for awhile on a rimfire. That's the best I can think to say about them....seriously, some are ok....I've had a 2-7x32mm AO "Airgun" scope on my Beeman Sportster for awhile now, and it holds up and kills birds. But generally, these are poor quality.
     
  3. ultramag44

    ultramag44 Member

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    Well now, that scope was made in one of the finest sweat shops :eek: ...um..I mean optics plants in China...

    When a country cheats in the Olympics (16 y/o my @&$), and lip-syncs the singer, :banghead: what makes you think their scopes would be any good?

    They could make a scope as good as anyone; the problem is, by the time they did, the retail price would be kissing close to the price for a high quality Japanese made scope.

    Almost all Chinese scopes are made to a price point. Folks just won't pay big $$ for a Chinese made scope.
     
  4. elmerfudd

    elmerfudd Member

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    $20 scopes generally suck. Use them on cheap airguns or .22's until you can get something better. They're pretty much turds all the way around. I've got about 4 similar scopes either lying around or on various low, low end rifles. They make good sights when you want to do some shooting experiments and you don't want to pull the scope off a decent rifle that's already sighted in. Case in point: I recently got a Brown Bess musket replica and I'm considering mounting one of my cheap scopes on it temporarily until I work out what load it likes.
     
  5. ants

    ants Member

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    I've got cheap scopes, and I've got expensive scopes. They are all good for their selective purpose. I certainly wouldn't be dumb enough to put my $440 glass on a blaster gun and drag it out to the desert for blasting.

    Go educate yourself on recoil with regard to optic sights. For instance, the shock from an airgun actually recoils in the opposite direction, so airgun scopes are made for opposite recoil. Similarly, 22 rimfire scopes should only be used on 22 rimfire guns. If you put a 22rimfire scope on an airgun, you run the risk of damaging it. Use a muzzle loader scope only on a muzzle loader. Use a shotgun scope only on a shotgun. Each was made to support the internal components under those specific conditions.

    Well, mount it on a 22 and have fun with it! The detractors wish to spoil your cheap fun. Don't let 'em succeed.
     
  6. elmerfudd

    elmerfudd Member

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    No, the shock from a spring piston airgun produces a double recoil. Other airguns do not and are even gentler on scopes than rimfires. Pretty much any high quality scope is suitable for use on airguns as well. Airguns aren't the only rifles with a double recoil, semi-auto's have the same effect. Shotgun scopes are just normal scopes with low magnification and simple reticles for fast shooting. Muzzle loader scopes often have BDC's and rangefinders built in, but they're otherwise no different. Pistol scopes have long eye relief, but so long as the scope is adequately constructed you can use any scope on any form of rifle.

    $20 scopes however often aren't adequately constructed for anything but rimfires and non-recoiling airguns.
     
  7. CRITGIT

    CRITGIT member

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    Anything made in China for the US is made to the specs and standards of the US company. So take issue with the right rip off artist. Yeah, China sucks but no more than the greedy SOB's WHO PROVIDE THE INFERIOR PRODUCT ORDERS!

    BSA scopes are not good scopes. However if yours doesn't self destruct immediately it will probably provide the service to which it was intended.

    Good luck!

    CRITGIT
     
  8. Mark K. C.

    Mark K. C. Member

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    I have used a BSA on my .22 autoloader for about 4 years. I zeroed- in using the small dot and supprisingly enough it has held true for me even after knocking it around a bit. The down side is whenever I change to another reticle they are not in line with the little dot.
     
  9. bergzilla

    bergzilla Member

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    semi autos have less recoil than say a bolt action .22.am i correct in this thought. the scope i bought was a 3x7 somthin or other. It says on the package that its intended for a .22 and LOWER. wich sucks but if it can get me close enuf to kill the birds than its good enuf 4 me.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2008
  10. elmerfudd

    elmerfudd Member

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    Any rimfire semi or bolt will have so little recoil that it just isn't an issue. If you accept the scope for what it is, then you didn't do bad. It's a $20 scope. Chances are the glass is poor, the adjustments are plastic and the crosshairs are thick, but if you can clearly see your target and it holds a zero then you've gotten your moneys worth. Sight it in where you want it and then leave it there. I find about a 75 yard zero to be good for a .22. That gives you a near zero of about 15 yards and puts you about an inch and a half high at 50 yards.

    If you don't shoot that far, then a 50 yard zero will give you a very flat trajectory up close. Basically from about 15 to 55 yards all you have to do is put the crosshairs on the target and you'll be within a 1/3" of it.
     
  11. bergzilla

    bergzilla Member

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    I got my scope zeroed at around 60 yards. the adjustments are metal(what shock:what:)and the cross hairs are VERY thin. Its had about 120 rounds fly by its path with satisfactory results. I would have bought a Nikon but those cost more than the gun itself.
     
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