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Bullet Alloy Recipe

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by grsjax, Dec 5, 2008.

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  1. grsjax

    grsjax Member

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    Had an assortment of lead and lead alloys laying around the shop and decided
    to see what I could come up with for bullet casting. Best mix seems to be
    50% WW + 30% Linotype + 5% 67/33 Solder + 15% Pure Lead. This results in an alloy with 0.13% Arsenic, 5.60% Antimony, 4.78% Tin and 89.49% Lead based on the published analysis of WW and Linotype. Haven't tried it at the range yet but it casts well and is pretty hard.
     
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    That is a pretty hard alloy, and I am sure it casts great, but you don't need that much linotype unless you are casting for high pressure, high velocity loads.

    I used to cast wheelweights with a little 95/5 solder mixed in for .44 Spl, .45 ACP & 9MM. I dropped them from the mold in a bucket of water to cool & harden them a tad more. It worked very well with no leading. I have some bullets I cast 15 plus years ago that look like new. I have some commercially cast 9MM bullets newer than that that look terrible.

    Unless we are running high pressure and high velocity, too hard an alloy is going to cause more problems than too soft.

    Bottom line though, is if they shoot well without leading, you've got a winner. :)
     
  3. grsjax

    grsjax Member

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    I usually just cast straight WW but I had the materials and I like to experiment. When I get a chance to go to the the range I will let you know how well they shoot. Planning on casting up some 500gr gas checked bullets for my bolt action 45/70 to see how well they do at 1700 to 1800 fps. This is what I was think of for hunting big hogs in brushy areas.
     
  4. 38 Super Auto

    38 Super Auto Member

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    I think the data shows that the vast majority of hardening is achieved with the Sb and trace As. Tin is expensive and concentrations greater than 2% don't do much for your alloy. Tin lowers the melting point of the alloy and help improve bullet fillout.

    I use WW, range scrap, and linotype. I obtain good results by sizing bullets 1-2 mils over groove diameter, and water dropping.
     
  5. lordgroom

    lordgroom Member

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    + 1 on Tin. Anything more than 2% is wasted.
     
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