Buying/selling strategies in today's market.

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by jim in Anchorage, Feb 9, 2013.

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  1. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    OK here's my question. I own a mini 14 I bought new in the early 90's for about $400 new. Barely use it. I was shocked to see them going for $850+ on the auction sites [and I mean going-20+ bids]

    I like the mini but would really like a Browning 9mm hi power[which of course is also going off the charts]

    I think the scare is temporary. My thought is sell the mini now for $900, hang on to the cash, wait till this blows over and replace the mini for $400 and buy the HP for $500[normal pre scare prices.]

    Does this sound like a good plan?
     
  2. Redlg155

    Redlg155 Member

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    Are you 100% confident there won't be some kind of ban affecting your Mini 14? Depending on on the market, your value may go up even more. I know of one guy who sold one on GB for $1800. At worse your mini will still be worth $4-500 even if no ban.

    You can't say that for the Browning. I would be patient and ride the storm. Things look good for us for a while, then some ex cop or other nutcase adds more wood to the fire.
     
  3. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    Ah that's the crystal ball part of it. hang on for more, or sell high now? And maybe never be able to replace it?
     
  4. hAkron

    hAkron Member

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    Selling it for an inflated price will make you a bit of money in the short term, but will perpetuate the inflated gun prices for a longer period of time. So you may make an extra $300 now, but when you just can't wait any longer to buy that hi-power, who knows, you might be paying an extra $400 for it.

    The best thing to do for everybody is to find out what the pre-panic value is of your mini 14, and if you must sell it now, sell it for closer to the pre-panic price, and sell it to somebody who wants a mini-14, not somebody who is buying it simply to turn around and cash in.

    If we refuse to participate in a panic economy, then the panic economy falls apart.

    That's just my 2¢, it's a free market society, gouge away if it please ya.
     
  5. Mousegun

    Mousegun Member

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    I fear that in this "political" climate, things may come down in price but not nearly as much as some of us think they will.

    The desire to arm is strong. I personally have had a number of acquaintances who formerly called me the gun nut come to me on bended knee. After a good dose of playful verbal abuse :evil: I brought them to my LGS, hooked them up with something from the counter and took them training and shooting.

    They paid more than if their choice was made a few months ago but that is just the way it is.
     
  6. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    If you could know accurately what your Mini 14 would sell for tomorrow, and a month from now, or a year out, would that knowledge cause you wait for the highest number?

    While that seems like the right answer on its face, the prices of everything else we need/want to buy are also fluctuating, as is our potential for continued employment. Selling the gun for $800 today then seeing others like it sell for $1000 by summer might make one feel like he should have waited, but that extra 25% does you no good if the prices of other things you need have shot up 30-40% by then. Effectively, you'd have made a worse deal.

    That's overly simplified, but it illustrates the complexity of economics and shows why predicting economic trends is akin to predicting the outcome of sporting events: you never know for sure until it's been played.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  7. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    True the mini may go up yet. but that would not concern me. I am not looking to maximize profits. It looks like my mini, today, can sell for what a mini and a HP together would have gotten a few months ago. Basically by selling during the scare, buying after the scare[when prices are normal] I have swapped my mini for a mini and a HP.

    Yes it's a gamble. I am banking on the scare to end, and prices to go to normal. 56 years old, seen this before. Many times.
     
  8. youngda9

    youngda9 member

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    Buy low, sell high. You missed the high point by a few weeks. It's still not too late to catch the downslope. Sell it.
     
  9. Deer_Freak

    Deer_Freak Member.

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    You will not be able to replace the Mini14 for $400. They have been over $600 NIB for the last couple years. I would do my research before dumping a gun you like. The last Mini 14 I saw at Walmart was well over $700.
     
  10. meanmrmustard

    meanmrmustard Member

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    This.

    Just like stocks, you make your money buying in a dying market, getting everything at bottom dollar. When the market rises (reason doesn't matter) your massive amount of shares just became commodity. You can sell at high price, reap reward, and die a rich old man with a pickled liver and cigar burns on your lips! The risk is if the market doesn't rebound.

    Just ask the ghost of Cornelius Vanderbilt: The guy self made a fortune in today's economy to the tune of 75+ Billion dollars. All by being smart, being ahead of the curve, and playing the railroad market like a fiddle.

    I'd sell while there's profit to be made. I hate inflation, gouging, hoarding...blah, blah, blah. You might as well make a buck with a commodity you own that many want.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  11. NHCraigT

    NHCraigT Member

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    Bottom line is: There are generally 2 types of people.

    There are gamblers and their are those that tend to play it safe.

    You will get the representative thoughts from each of the 2 types here = 50% / 50% +/-

    Essentially, its your rifle, do what you want. If you're of the gambling type = go for it and take the known risks (Gambling is ALWAYS a risk).

    I guess that's the whole point here. You are hoping to get feedback that will tell you the risks are minimal, and it really could go either way.

    = 2 cents.
     
  12. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    Ok lets get this clear. By selling the mini now, I clear $500. That's a fact. The gamble is if I do not sell now do I risk seeing the price go down? It doesn't matter if it goes up, I still make a good profit today.

    Really gambling is a bad choice of words. I won today. Cash out and go home. Gambling is if I hold onto it to see if the price goes higher.
    My only real risk is if the price keeps going up and I can never replace it.

    For you younger guys I been through many of these scares, starting with 68 GCA. Prices go up, prices go down. It never fails.
     
  13. ID-shooting

    ID-shooting Member

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    If the ban were to pass today the mini-14 would be part of it. Along with the SKS, it made the exemption list.

    That being said, if you must sell, at least be honorable about it and find someone who really wants one and not some schmuck who will simply prey of the uneducated and too panicked to do their research.
     
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