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Call it "bubba'd" if you want.

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by jordan1948, Jul 11, 2009.

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  1. jordan1948

    jordan1948 Member

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    Whenever someone gets the idea to upgrade a milsurp everyone calls it "bubba'd" for some reason. Even if it looks really great. Well I look at it like I would if someone was restoring a worn out, beat up old car. You want it to run better right? And it sure is a whole lot more fun if the car runs right and you don't have to put a gallon of oil in it a month. Now I can understand if someone puts a bullpup stock on a M98 that's just goofy and pointless but if they want a tackdriving rifle and don't like irons then go ahead and sporterise it.
     
  2. Woolecox

    Woolecox Member

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    I think restoring a milsurp is just a fine idea. There are a lot of smiths out there that have the talent to restore them to their original state or turn them into a serious sporter type rifle.

    Not a bad option if done right considering what we are seeing coming out of some of the factory guns these days.
     
  3. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    I hear ya,jordan1948. Take a 1911 or an AR-15 and put any number of aftermarket parts on it and it is "upgraded". Do the same thing for an SKS or any mil-surp and it is "bubbah'd". Go figure. Some are also quick to point out that the finished product is worth a fraction of it's cost to be built(which IS true). Of course the same can be said for that 1911,AR-15 or restored musclecar.
     
  4. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    my feelings on it are it is the owners rifle to do as he wishes.

    i only have two 98's - one a 98/22 and one a turk. the 98/22 had headspace problems, was too heavy, not accurate enough, uncomfortable stock, slow lock time, poor trigger, and on and on. now, that same rifle is chambered in 8 mauser, as engraved on the 19" shilen barrel, has talley lightweights drilled into the receiver to get a better purchase on the zeiss scope, and the claro walnut stock has been bedded to make sure the rifle is as accurate as it can be. the rifle balances perfectly, is the perfect weight for a general purpose hunter, barrel is perfectly sized and proportioned to obtain max performance in a smallish package... call it bubba'd, i call it the perfect hunter...

    the turk is in full military form, including bayonet and cover. don't particularly care for the rifle as is, but am not in a real big hurry to make it right, either. i will soon, i suppose, but i have a couple other guns on my want list before i'm ready to comission another custom...
     
  5. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    one of the problems i see is there are many people who cannot see the difference between a finely built sporting rifle & a bubba hack job, many of them frequent this forum.
    to them there is no difference between a h&h mauser sporting rifle, a g&h springfield, a wundhammer springfield, a rigby mauser & a turk m38, with a hacksaw shortened barrel, crooked scope mounts, a cold blue job applied over rust, & a homebuilt stock made from a landscaping timber, a tin can, some bailing wire & old flip flop for a recoil pad.
    to them any rifle that is no longer in military condition is a worthless bubba hack job & should be turned into scrap metal so they won't have to look at it.
     
  6. BunnyPuncher

    BunnyPuncher Member

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    I'm not a fan of sporterizing because imho, the aesthetics of the rifle are always downgraded. Why? because I like the look of of the full wood stock and hand guard. It's just me. I'd rather you had bought an off the rack .308 than mess with a Mauser or even a Nagant, but hey, it is your time and money and I can understand the appeal of a project gun. In some circles (7.62x54.net or example) I'd be a heathen because I tend to strip the butt ugly shellac off of my Mosins and apply BLO. It is not authentic, but it lets the wood shine through instead of being covered by commie goo.

    As WWII milsurps get more difficult to acquire you will see increased hostility from collectors to people sporterizing. They look at it as a rifle that they could have kept in original condition that some redneck hunter ruined.

    Now, sporterizing has a long tradition in the post war eras in almost every country in NA and Western Europe (and elsewhere I am sure). Milsurp guns were cheap and affordable and a lot of fellows were probably interested in the guns they, their allies, and their enemies used. Russians cut down Mosins (Obrez anyone?), Yanks cut down M1s, Arisakas and Hosers and Limeys cut down Enfields. They took rifles that were clunky, heavy and too long for the woods and turned em into things that were useful in their daily lives. This tradition continues, and I think it is a fine one. These guns, which were produced for infernal, noble, cruel, heroic tools of war are turned into tools to take game or just punch paper providing enjoyment.

    Go bubba. But don't mess with K31s, M1 garands or virgin K98s or I'll punch you in the groin.

    Cheers
     
  7. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    Here's my "bubba'...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Pack

    Pack Member

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    My next project is somehing that I've decided I'd like to see more often.

    There are many milsurp rifles that have been "sporterized" that, even if they look great, many of us history buff types wish they'd been left alone.

    However, because of expense, etc. - I'm told - "restoring" them to their mil-spec form is perhaps dubious at best.

    So, what is one to do?

    I think a neat solution would be to take a gun that was chopped up in recent decades, and use IT as the basis for a sporter that mimics the way such guns would have been built as sporters at the time they were in military service - i.e., "sporterize" a K98k action in accordance with the aesthetics of the 30s + 40s, etc.

    I think it'd be great to take a gun that's simple been chopped, scoped, and stocked, and turn it into something that looks like the following:

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=133560203

    In fact, I may just try and buy that one, as I like the idea and look of it so much, I'd in all probability simply try to duplicate the effort anyway.
     
  9. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    "the aesthetics of the rifle are always downgraded"

    It would be impossible to make that claim since you didn't see the mil-surp BEFORE sproterizing. People seem to think that ALL sporterized mil-surps were in pristene condition before "Bubbah" got hold of it. MOST "Bubbah'd" mil-surp have only had their stocks chopped to a more sporter look. In those cases it is a simple matter to buy a replacement mil-spec stock and hardware to put it back into military configuration. MOST often there has been NO cutting or grinding to the metalwork. Now we come to the mil-surps that I use. These are generally junk when I buy them. A receiver with a shot out barrel sans bolt or other parts. I COULD buy all military parts and assemble a mil-spec arm but then I would have twice what it would cost to build a sporter invested in a mix master worth about $225.00 on average. OR I can get aftermarket commercial parts and build a sport rifle to my own specs. BTW,take those chrome wheels off of that "Bubbahed up" Mustang,it should have Magnum 500s.
     
  10. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    looks a+ to me classy
     
  11. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    Just two minutes from sanity.
    For every beautifully sporterized milsurp I've seen, I've seen a mountain of butchered guns.
     
  12. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Joe Demko, I don't doubt that for a minute,so have I. That is beside the point. The problem and the reason for this thread (I believe) is that ANY modification to a mil-surp is automatic Bubbahizing. All anyone has to say is "I have a sporterized mil-surp" and the Bubbah catcalls come out. Those butchered guns you refer to are generally where we get our raw material for sporterizing. So tell me,what is better? A collection of surplus parts in someones junk bin or a hunting rifle carefully assembled and finished by someone who appreciates it.
     
  13. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    well i have seen kagillion piece of junk attachments for AR'S too.
     
  14. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    Just two minutes from sanity.
    The guys who butchered all those guns thought they were turning trash into treasure, too. The real question is how reallistically you assess your own skills at this. I've seen gun butchers proudly show off the "fruit" of their labor. They mistook having put time and effort into it for having done a good job.
    No doubt you love your works too. Do people who aren't your buddies think as highly of them as you?
    Recently, we had a fellow here converting a functional milsurp in good condition to a .22 magnum. What do you think of something like that?
     
  15. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    many of those butchers also developed their skills over a few projects & started turning out some great work. some of them even became famous. r.f. sedgley's early rifles would be considered bubba hack jobs compared to his later rifles.
    remchester doesn't make a rifle that appeals to me so i have to build them myself.
    i did buy one of the remington 799 mini mausers & started cutting on it as soon as i got it home. i wonder if 50 years from now some wacko remington collector will be cussin me for it
     
  16. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    "Many?" No. A few. A precious, tiny few.
     
  17. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    gotta break some eggs to make an omlette
     
  18. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    As a matter of fact JD,my friends think more highly of my work than I do(since I KNOW where any flaws are). Perhaps you missed the part where I said that I start out with PARTS not rifles. It is clear that your mind is made up and that's okay, so is mine.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
  19. jordan1948

    jordan1948 Member

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    Pardon my ignorance but what is that Olympus?
     
  20. gunlover_06

    gunlover_06 Member

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    Here's my bubbahd 1896 swedish mauser
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Kenny
     
  21. jordan1948

    jordan1948 Member

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    ^See now that's what I'm talkin' about!^
     
  22. browningguy

    browningguy Member

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    I like Bubba'd milsurps, here's my 1891 Mauser. I didn't do it, but I did buy it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  23. gunlover_06

    gunlover_06 Member

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    Browningguy
    That is one pretty rifle you have there
     
  24. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    actually i've witness more than a tiny few develop into very good builders in just the last couple of years. while its true that some people do not have the patience & skills to do fine work there are many that do and you can see a big difference in the quality of their work over the course of several projects.
    i know my first attempts weren't all that great but i kept at it rebuilding several rifles untill i got them right before moving on to other builds.

    what annoys me is when people start cutting on sporting rifles. if you have to cut up something do it to one of those worthless milsurps. some crazed lunatic drilled this lee speed for a sidemount. this rifle is not & never was a military rifle, if you tried to put it back to military condition you would be the bubba
    [​IMG]
     
  25. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    I like some of the high skill quality sporterizations that were done in the 50's and 60's. Many of these rifles can be had for a song and would cost over a grand in parts and labor to build today.

    I also agree with the posters who point out the folly in chopping up an original military today. I this makes no sense as you never can recoup half of the price you have in a sporter, and given the massive quantities of worthless pre done sporters available on
    todays market

    [​IMG]
     
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