Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Can anyone ID this old .45 semi-auto rifle?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Topgun121, Jan 9, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Topgun121

    Topgun121 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Messages:
    37
    My father in law let me borrow this gun that he found in his attic, to clean it up and lube it. I don't know anything about it. Stamped on the side is ".45 cal semi-auto, Volunteer Inc., Knoxville, TN". Anyone have any info to share?


    101_3304.jpg
    101_3303.jpg
     
  2. Ian

    Ian Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,857
  3. srkavanagh6621

    srkavanagh6621 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Messages:
    131
    what he said!
     
  4. VA27

    VA27 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,864
    Location:
    Slovenly Manor, Dungheap-Upon-The-Hill
    Wow, that's an early one! Pretty cool old gun. It uses the old WWII 'Grease Gun' magazines. Later models used Thompson mags. Happy Shooting!
     
  5. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Messages:
    8,111
    Location:
    Kingsport Tennessee
    That is an early Volunteer carbine (later models designed by the same guy
    were known as the Commando Arms Mark III (with a square rather than
    round receiver) and later as the Manchester).

    Early versions used the M3 grease gun magazines. The Mark V and Mark 45
    used the Thompson magazines. There was a 9mm version called the Mark 9
    but they seem to be had to find. They still show up at wildly inflated prices
    at East Tennessee gun shows.

    A few years back, I started research on Commando Arms but got
    sidetracked. According to my notes:

    ""A central person at Volunteer Enterprises/Commando Arms was
    James McCown. He worked at Spitfire in Arizona and then started
    Volunteer Enterprises in Knoxville TN; Volunteer Enterprises was also
    known as Commando Arms. Finally McCown went to
    Manchester Arms located in Lenoir TN. The last Commando carbine
    was the Commando Mark 45 by Manchester Arms.""

    The original Spitfire was a tommy gun look-alike that was discontinued
    because ATF decided it was "readily convertible". The Volunteer carbines
    were redesigned to avoid the problems with the original Spitfire carbine.

    Commando Arms also made stock kits for the US GI M1 carbine that
    made the M1 Carbine sort of look like a tommy gun. Mark I had a fixed butt
    stock, Mark II was stockless (but over 26" and still made a Title I rifle), and
    Mark IV had a detachable buttstock. Plainfield Machine Company did sell
    some of their M1 Carbine replicas in Mark II Commando Arms stocks.
     
  6. Topgun121

    Topgun121 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Messages:
    37
    thanks guys! It must be an older one, it has a number (serial number?) stamped on it that is one hundred and something.
     
  7. SaxonPig

    SaxonPig Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    4,787
    I believe the ATF put this gun out of business because it was too easy to convert to full auto.
     
  8. rondog

    rondog Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Messages:
    6,828
    Location:
    Commurado
    "Found in his attic?" As in, he didn't know it was there? Maybe I should look around in mine.....
     
  9. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Messages:
    8,111
    Location:
    Kingsport Tennessee
    The Spitfire carbine was taken off the market, but the Volunteer and Commando carbines were designed.
     
  10. brandon_mcg

    brandon_mcg Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Messages:
    614
    Location:
    Macon, Ga
    man, the only thing my family members and in-laws find in their attics are old newspapers.

    looks like a fun toy
     
  11. nwilliams

    nwilliams Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2006
    Messages:
    4,461
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Man that grip looks so uncomfortable but that's a really cool find!

    Check this out. The guy selling this gun provides some good info on it.
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=210643326

    Apparently it fires from an open bolt which would explain why it went on the ATF's hit list.

    Definitely a gun to hang on to, I imagine if kept in it's original condition it will only increase in value over time.
     
  12. dafitch

    dafitch Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    WV
    Where's the cocking lever?
     
  13. hirundo82

    hirundo82 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    998
    Location:
    The Deep South
    Perhaps it is charged like the M3A1, using your finger in a slot machined into the bolt?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page