Can you eat raccoon year round?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Kevinq6, Jun 4, 2021.

  1. Barbaroja

    Barbaroja Member

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    Oh my wife thinks I’m nuts too! You should have seen her reaction when she found the skinned out rattlesnake in a ziplock bag in the fridge! That was a few years ago and she still brings it up hahahah
    As for the “ tastes like” analogy, how else would one convey the flavor of a meat without comparing it to a commonly known flavor. That yote backstrap did taste just like pork. I believe you could give that to someone and they wouldn’t know the difference ( don’t do that folks nobody likes to be tricked and it’s just not funny). I’d also prefer the real thing so to speak and stock my freezer with pork not coyote steaks. I don’t have any desire to eat it again but now I know.
     
  2. George P

    George P member

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    Aren't armadillos supposed to carry leprosy?
     
  3. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    They can. One should be careful during prep and be sure to cook it well. Hopefully everyone eating animals from the wild is already following those rules regardless of the type of animal.
     
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  4. 1942bull
    • Contributing Member

    1942bull Contributing Member

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    A long ago friend who lived in Louisiana where raccoons abound told me he ate it at least one a month all year long. He did say learning how to cook it was a challenge. He died a couple years ago. His wife told me it was a heart attack so I would not worry about eating it anytime. It is popular in LA.
     
  5. Bama59

    Bama59 Member

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    I had BBQ coon once when a kid on my uncles farm in Missouri , it was dark red meat with lots of pepper. .
     
  6. red rick

    red rick Member

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    It is a tough meat and greasy . A good way to cook it is in a crockpot or make a soup or stew with it .

    The first frost comes from wolves or warbles . It comes from a fly larvae . Around here you mostly hear about it in squirrels in late fall . I guess by the first frost it has left the host animal . It is nasty looking , but will not hurt you if you cook the meat good . I have never seen a flea , tick or wolf on a squirrel though .

    With rabbits my grandpa always told my cousin and I to wear gloves when skinning a rabbit , because of the possibility of getting rabbit fever or tularemia and my grandpa didn’t take many precautions , so it stuck with me . The main thing that I see in rabbits around here when cleaning them is tapeworms . If they have a lot of fleas on them , most of the time they will have tapeworms . I find them infested with fleas in February , depending on where we hunt . I don’t let my dogs eat the guts or let anyone hunting with me clean a rabbit until my dogs are up . Or they will get tapeworms .
     
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  7. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    Squirrels and rabbits get werbles here in the summer, and I have seen squirrels with the pox in the summer. The deer I have killed in the early archery season here (when its still hot as blue blazes) are always ate up with ticks and such. You can really see them on the white belly when you first drop them.
     
  8. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    I went to a wild game cookout and ate it. It was delicious. It tasted like young succulent pork. However, I never cleaned one after watching someone else do it. The blood was maroon not red. It kind of spooked me.

    I was going to eat a hooded merganser once but the meat cooked up gray instead of reddish-brown so I vetoed that idea.
     
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  9. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

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    My ancestors ate coons and possums and
    such year round with no problems.
    If they'd turned up their noses, they'd have
    went hungry with just a few greens and a
    piece of cornbread or a biscuit.
    Animals and fish you're eating need to be
    dressed ASAP and cared for so they'll
    taste decent
    Get the guts and the glands out ASAP
    and trim off the ugly mess and it'll be ok.
    I know a lot of people are partial to bloody
    meat these days, but I'd advise to cook
    it thoroughly

    With some dark days looming on the
    horizon, it'd be a good idea to learn how
    to dress all kinds of animals and fish
    and fowl for your consumption and
    not rely on an outside source
     
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  10. Ole Joe Clark

    Ole Joe Clark Member

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    Growing up, my family was dirt poor, not bragging or complaining, just stating a fact. As a small boy, one of the few things I remember about growing up was the variety of critters we ate. Of course we ate chicken, but I remember eating boiled quail eggs, turtle, rabbit and squirrel, probably opossum, fish of all kinds, but no coon. The kids, me, couldn't eat the white meat of the chicken, it was reserved for adults. My piece was the thigh. When times were tough I remember eating cornmeal mush, or as Mama called it, meal soup, and nothing else, and potato dumplings, I still love dumplings today.

    Have a blessed day,

    Leon
     
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  11. frogfurr

    frogfurr Member

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    There was a time in my youth that if we didn't take game we would have no meat. And the only thing we would have left to eat was soup beans. We ate soup beans 365 days a year. I was truly raised on soup beans and still hate them.We would eat about any meat that was out there but not raccoons. The neighbors didn't eat raccoons either. There was enough game out there of different varieties that we were told not to eat coons and possums. And maybe we were told wrong.
     
  12. AK Hunter

    AK Hunter Member

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    Not when I have a freezer full of deer. LOL
     
  13. frogfurr

    frogfurr Member

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    There was a time in Ohio that deer were non existent. Wiped out. Until about 1980.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2021
  14. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    Shouldn't that be "What shell do you recommend for oyster ?"... o_O
    ;)
     
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  15. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    My grandma was a child of the depression. She was the baby of a family of 7 kids 2 parents and a grandmother in the home. That’s 10 mouths to feed, during the depression. They are everything “except buzzard and polecat” and grandmas job was to run a trot line on the creek and pond, carry a single shot 22 and kill anything that moved and bring it home for dinner. She listed off a bunch of critters that didn’t sound super appetizing, but apparently was pretty fair. She got scolded for black snake because they eat mice and mice eat what little food was in the pantry. I can see her sitting in her big rocking chair with a cigarette in one hand and her walking cane on the other just totally in a daze telling the story. On to the subject matter... she would kill coins in the winter and hang them up in a tree to let them freeze. If she didn’t kill anything else she would bring home a coon, but she despised it. She said it stunk and had an odd flavor that they never could get out of it. When they tried to make it taste good they used so much stuff that it cost as much as buying soup bones from the butcher.

    A few she said were good...
    Cottonmouth
    Wood hen
    Owl
    Fox
    Bobcat
     
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  16. frogfurr

    frogfurr Member

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    Muskrat
    Snapping turtle
    Quail
    Pheasant
    Rabbit
    Fish
    Puff balls
    Morels
    Squirrels
    Dandelions
    Poke weed
    Dandelion greens

    These are what we had available from the forest.
     
  17. BJung

    BJung Member

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    I've had racoon before. I gave it to my cousin to cook it for me and it had the texture of stew beef to me. I wouldn't mind eating it again. I had a girlfriend who's grandmother cooked a opossum but I never tried that. I suppose it's good. Jed Clampet in the Beverly Hillbillies loved the way Granny made it.
     
  18. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    I have been playing at "primitive" archery for the past couple of decades, and one of the things which impresses me about those gentlemen is that if they kill it, they eat it.

    That has become my mantra as well, and I have found that with one horrendous exception (an old boar hog that must have had syphilis or something) that they are right.

    Short version: the pressure cooker is a miracle worker. With the exception of syphilitic pigs, there is no meat that cannot be made palatable with a crock pot and a good chili recipe.
     
  19. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    A common theme in true Mexican food are dishes that are based on some stock ingredients and spices to which you can add just about any meat ingredient that has been ground or shredded without changing the overall character of the dish very much.
     
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  20. Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave Member

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    The part about the "freeze" may be as rabbits live in areas where there is no hard freeze, but not eating them at certain times of the year is perhaps the basis for the tale.... Where it does freeze, perhaps sick animals would die, and thus the remainder would be OK to hunt and eat ?
    Tularemia aka Rabbit Fever
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tularemia

    LD
     
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  21. Golfanaticshooter

    Golfanaticshooter Member

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    I like Rib Eye, is that wrong?
     
  22. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Raccoon fat, from my experience has an odd, "flat" gaminess to it, that's hard to cook out (or season around).
    And the meat is often very marbled with the fat (except in the very early spring) which makes the meat greasy/oily and imputes that flavor to the meat.
    It does not stew well at all.
    Unless, perhaps, a person slow cooked the meat to build a bark (and drip away the fat), and stewed the barky-seared meat after.
    Can't say I'm a fan.
    So, in full answer to the OP question, I'm barely up to eating once a decade, year around not one of my choices.
     
  23. Bandit67

    Bandit67 Member

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    :barf::barf::barf::barf::barf::barf::barf::barf::barf:
    Yuck!
     
  24. whughett

    whughett Member

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    I’ve eaten raccoon on several occasions at game dinners over the years until the state started regulating the practice of public game dinners.
    Mostly it was cooked in a tomato sauce that essentially covered up any game taste.
     
  25. red rick

    red rick Member

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    Tomato sauce , taco seasoning , chili powder and teriyaki sauce works wonders . A good gravy can help things also . My grandma could cook your boot and make it tender and delicious .
     
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