Quantcast

Canadian vs. United States victimization

Discussion in 'Activism Discussion and Planning' started by Stephen Maize, Jan 10, 2020.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    56,268
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Statistical validity of a survey (the data is a survey, not a poll) is based on making sure your sample size is large enough and demographically representative to look at a representative smaller population than the whole of a community to have good quality data. For a simple example - you examine a subset of all the parts in a lot or of the lots in a production run, not the whole production run. No need to inspect every piece as long as you sample enough to establish a statistically valid result. Things are more complex outside of simple QC. Generally the margin of error of a survey improves as the survey group number goes up, 1/√N, but there's no need to involve the total population you're trying to represent if your group sampled is 10,000 or more. That gives you a margin of error of 1% in reliability of the data. 33,000 out of a population of 37,000,000 gives a 0.5% margin of error for a 95% confidence level in the data. Make it harder and drive the confidence level to 99% for the same census and sample group and you get a 0.7% margin of error.

    Pretty much anything above 10,000 is a good sample group size. 100 level statistics (I hated taking the class at the time, but it has been helpful).
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2020
    Stephen Maize likes this.
  2. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    The assault with force in 2010 for Canada might not right. The 3.5% rate includes threats. I’m waiting for information on just assaults from the International victimization survey from 2010. I reported 3.5% because that is all I could find.

    This is regarding the assault rates from my Victimization in Canada part 2 post.
     
  3. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    In the United States, the burglary rate is 5.9% in 1993,3.4% in 1999,2.9% in 2004,2.5% in 2009, 2.3% in 2014.

    burglary is according to the United States National Crime Victimization Survey. For Canada, burglary is according to the Canadian Victimization survey.
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    56,268
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Screenshot_2020-01-25 Canadian vs United States victimization.png

    So it looks like both the US and Canadian burglary rates are falling over time. The US rate falls faster than the Canadian such that Canada has a higher rate than the US from '99 onward.

    Interesting to see that Canada isn't as crime free as many Americans think.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2020
  5. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    D8F7E599-E99E-4123-8053-BC3907D095C6.jpeg

    International Victimization Survey to the left. Canadian Victimization Survey to the right.
     
  6. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Could it be than if the United States burglary rate was 4.7% in 2004. If we consider the United States National Crime Victimization Survey rate of 2.9% for 2004, 2.5% for 2009 and 2.3% for 2014, 2.2% for 2015, 2.3% for 2016, 2.0% for 2017,2.1% for 2018. could it be that the burglary rate might be 4.7% for 2004, 4.4% for 2009, and 4.2% for 2014? I think the International Victimization Survey would reflect those rates for the United States. I would beg to differ. I feel that the United States has higher rates.

    So it would be United States burglary rate of / Canadian burglary rate of

    4.7% for 2004 3.6% for 2004

    4.4% for 2009 3.3% for 2009

    4.2% for 2014 3.1% for 2014

    4.1% for 2015

    4.2% for 2016

    3.9% for 2017

    4.0% for 2018
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice