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Carl Gustafs Stades Gevarsfaktori (swedish mauser help)

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Birdmang, Mar 12, 2011.

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  1. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    My friend got a swedish mauser, its drilled for a scope mount and the bolt is turned down. I don't know if any were made this way but it looks like it was done like this originally, it looks real nice.

    I think its a 6.5x55.

    It has a spot for a bayonet.

    Its a carbine, and its a m94 I believe.


    Is there anything I should look for on this rifle that would make it stand out from others?

    What should i know about this cool mauser?"
     
  2. ldhulk

    ldhulk Member

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    They came with a turned down bolt handle, but it won't clear a low mounted scope, nor will the original safety. A reciever (peep) sight works well, or maybe a high scope mount. That 17 inch barrel makes it look like a flame thrower in low light.
     
  3. ridgerunner1965

    ridgerunner1965 Member

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    yea put a scope on it and enjoy!there are several aftermarket safeties that will make it easier to use.i have bold trigger on mine with a side safety.yu can not find a rifle that will shoot like a good swede mauser.as a bonus the 6.5x55 is prob the best deer cartridge there ever was.
     
  4. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    What year?
    Do the number match?

    The m/94carbines with the bayonet attaching hardware were an upgrade modification done on most of them starting in 1914. Thus the m/94s with a bayonet mount are usually referred to as m/94-14.

    There was one other very rare variant with a side mount for the bayonet. Those are worth a small fortune.

    How bad are the scope mount holes...?? Are they on top or on the side?
    Could they be blank filled???

    m/94s are worth quite a bit of money. There is a special lower level of hell for whoever bubba-ed the poor thing...

    This photo shows a m/94-14 along with a m/38 and m/96.

    [​IMG]
     

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  5. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    The scope holes are on top and small. The leather is still on the gun near the butt stock and so is the brass quarter sized thing with numbers on it.

    The previous owner lacquered it heavily. Nothing is cut or missing on it either. We took it down completely and removed all the lacquer from the steel. We sanded the stock down to bare wood. Now to refinish and put back together.

    My friend payed $250 for it from an old man. The old man said he never scoped it or drilled it so idk what to make of the holes.

    The owner of the gun never sells anything, so he wanted to refinish it and I support that, its not bubba'd and it will kill deer and hogs this year.

    Thanks for the info guys
     
  6. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    What does the stock disc have written on it?
     
  7. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    EDIT:

    i.3

    No.1111
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2011
  8. Vaarok

    Vaarok Member

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    The holes could be for a reciever sight. Regardless, M94 carbines are worth a lot of money. Don't modify it, provide us photographs so that we can ascertain condition, and stand by. Worst case you've got a slightly damaged awesome rifle or maybe a quick tripling of your money.
     
  9. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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  10. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    Third Infantry, rifle number 1111.
    That disc is unusual since it does not have a company stamped on it... maybe they were reserved non-company assigned.
    The disc sure looks scratchy like somebody sanded it....
    I hope you guys did not remove much wood during your stock sanding. A nice (non-bubba) m/94 stock is worth more than you paid for the whole rifle.
     
  11. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    There was about 2mm of lacquer on it so we just got that off and a little bit of wood on the non critical parts for fitting. It will be done tomorrow and Ill post more pictures.

    THanks for all the information. Is it normal that there are crowns all over this rifle?

    Also what does the "1.5" mean on the side of the front sight?
     
  12. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    The Crowns are Swedish acceptance marks. They are a monarchy....
    There are three different types of crown stamps found on Swedish Mausers.

    The crown stamped used by those rifles made in Germany at the Mauser factory on the Neckar river. They have a baggy looking bottom on the crown.

    The Crown stamp used by the Carl Gustaf Rifle (government) factory in Sweden, with a tighter looking bottom
    and
    the tilted crown used by the Husqvarna factory in Sweden.

    The 1.5 was the sight height number. They came in kit boxes of different heights so the rifle could be zeroed.

    By the way, there are better ways to remove lacquer from a stock than sanding... but that ship has sailed...
     
  13. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    Yeah we jumped the gun. I guessed it was a 6.5x55 and then I guessed it was a run of the mill swiss mauser. I'm a little bummed but my friend is a shooter and not a collector. If we ever take it hunting in the field Ill try to convince him to put some bubba stock on it and keep the real one at home.
     
  14. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    It is possible to do both with a Swedish Mauser. I have hunted with 3 or 4 of mine that are in full military condition and I have won military rifle matches with them as well. On more than one occasion using different rifles so as not to tick off the competition.
    http://www.nrablog.com/post/2010/05/30/Sixth-Annual-Mauser-Match-in-Homer-Alaska.aspx

    The Helmet is the trophy.
     

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  15. shootr

    shootr Member

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    Nice job FP!!

    Those Swede and Swiss rifles sure will shoot.
     
  16. Birdmang

    Birdmang Member

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    Pictures added:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Caddisflied

    Caddisflied Member

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    Looks like a nice rifle Birdmang.
    Since it's already drilled out, I'd try putting a scope on it.
    These old 6.5's are amazingly accurate and it's a great caliber for hunting.
    I've taken several nice whitetail bucks with my Swedish Mauser.

    I see that you're put the rifle back together.
    I've got my 1920 CG mod96 apart for cleaning and I notice it has a 74 and G stamped
    underneath the receiver. It also has an F stamped under the barrel near the receiver.
    I'm hoping someone will know what these markings mean?

    Nice job Float Pilot. Great shooting!
     
  18. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    Caddisflied:

    Are you sure it is an F and not a poorly stamped B on the bottom of your m/96 barrel.?
    Is there a crown under or near the letter?

    What marks are on the wrist of the stock? Between the rear sling attach mount and the trigger guard.
    There should be some arsenal rebuild marks (stamp marks in the wood) that look like little crowns.

    All the other numbers and letters on the bottom side of the receivers are the various inspection marks added by people as the rifle continued through production.

    Here is the bottom side of an m/96 barrel showing that it was re-barreled by the Carlsborg Armory. The spelling was later changed to Karlsborg.

    [​IMG]
     

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  19. Caddisflied

    Caddisflied Member

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    There are two crowns on the underside of the wrist,
    and two more under the barrel.
    The F appears to be a seperate stamp on the underside of the barrel,
    but on the opposite side from the serial #.
    There may also be a small F under the wrist,
    it's hard to make out with my eyesight.

    I've looked through the archived threads enough to know about some
    of the other markings on the gun (like the HK).
    I found the canted crown on the bolt (Husqvarna)
    I didn't find an SA marking on the receiver but there is an S preceded by
    a bracket symbol, like this [s

    Another question, I read that some of these guns were rebarrelled.
    If parts were changed (such as the barrel), did they restamp the new part with the original serial number? All the serial numbers match on my rifle.

    One last thing. The disk on the rifle stock has a triangle stamped over both the 1 and the 2. Is that from two different inspections, or did
    the condition of this gun fall between the two grade levels?

    Thanks for your input, Pilot.
    Your knowledge is greatly appreciated!
     
  20. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    The HK before the serial number means that your M/96 was built when Lieutenant Helge Gustaf Ludvig Kolthoff (born 8-7-1878) was the chief inspector at the CG (Gov't Rifle Factory) Between April 1912 and Feb 1923.

    The bolt is a Husqvarna made replacement part. They are very common and it would be serial numbered to the rifle. Just as replacement barrels would be as well. They were rebuilding some of these rifles well into the 1970s. Some of the later rebuilds at Army depots show odd barrel vice marks.

    The marks above the 1 and the 2 came from two different inspections. But a 2 grade barrel fro the Swedes was usually better than a new barrel for most other countries.
    They were a bit excessive-compulsive about their rifles.

    The ..[S.. might be a poorly done Finn acceptance mark from the Winter war and Continuation War time period. (WWII) I would have to see it.

    Here is a late re-barreled m/96 with the odd barrel vice marks.
     

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  21. Caddisflied

    Caddisflied Member

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    Thanks for the info!
    I don't see any barrel vice marks on my rifle.
    And the [s could very well be a poorly stamped SA.
    There seems to be a little hint of some markings beside the S?
    I bought this rifle in the early 90's and when I saw how well it shot,
    I decided to hold onto it.
    (If this is a grade #2, I can just imagine how the better grades must shoot).
    It was my intention to work up some handloads for it someday.
    Haha, it's been almost 20 years, I better get started. Any suggestions?

    Again, many thanks
     
  22. snake284

    snake284 Member

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    One thing to remember, as good of rifles as they were, that action is not as strong as a model 98. You can't load it up near as hot. You should stay within SAAMI specs as far as pressure loads go. It will slowly stretch and it can cause a case head separation over time as the head space gets way out of spec. However, in 6.5x55 it's already a good killer as is, within reasonable ranges out to possibly 400 yards if you do your part as a shooter. Remember good bullet placement makes up for a lot of sin.
     
  23. Caddisflied

    Caddisflied Member

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    Thanks for the advice snake284.
    I haven't done much reloading for a few years and I appreciate the reminder regarding chamber pressure in these older rifles.
     
  24. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    Here is a load that shoots to the sights of my 94 and is pretty mild yet has killed deer WELL!
    This is my load for my 6.5x55Swedish Mauser M94 carbine, Small rifle primers from CCI 200, Hornady Round160 grains, 0.251 Ball. coef. IMR 4064 /31.5 grains @ 2100fps, 3.018" AOL,5.37SD Shoots nice and deadly accurate, Start your loads with -10% less powder charge and go .5 grains increments until you are happy with your load.
     
  25. Caddisflied

    Caddisflied Member

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    Looks like I need to restock my loading bench.
    I've got some IMR4350, IMR4320, and some H4831,
    but no IMR4064.
    Do you have any experience with the Rel 22 powder?
    I haven't used it. But I've seen it recommended several times for various calibers.

    It might be a few weeks before I do any loading for this Mauser.
    I'm playing with an Anschutz 1411 Match 54 that I recently purchased.

    Thanks for the load recommendation Gordon!
     
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