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Carnivore vs Parang

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Hunter125, Jul 11, 2013.

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  1. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    I have been looking at getting a small machete for defensive/emergency purposes, kind of as a tool/weapon to keep in my emergency pack.

    I have been looking at the Gerber Parang and almost bought one last night, but saw a Camillus Carnivore there for a few dollars cheaper. They are very different, but I ended up with the Carnivore last night. Seemed a little more suited to an all around tool, if a little less toward the weapon side. I will probably get both eventually, but I wanted to get your opinions on the pros and cons of these two.
     
  2. Piraticalbob

    Piraticalbob Member

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  3. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    Right, but only some runs I believe. They had specific model numbers in the recall notice. They wouldn't still be selling them if they were still the batch that had been recalled.
    Update: Yep, only specific model numbers were recalled. Gerber told people to send them back and they would send a replacement. New ones are okay.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  4. mdauben

    mdauben Member

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    I don't know, maybe I'm just being snobby but I wouldn't have bought one even before the recall. I refuse to pay extra for some celebrities name on a functional tool, especially someone like Bear Gryls. IMO there are better choices out there for the same or less money. I'd check out the offerings from Condor, Tramontina, Martindale, or other companies that make real working machetes.

    If you want a parang style machete, Martindale makes a good, basic one w/ full tang for about the same price. IIRC, Martindale makes machetes for the British military. I've got one an I've been happy with it.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  5. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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  6. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    Previously, I was the "big chopper" guy on THR.

    I am, however, rapidly being replaced by Sam Cade. :D

    (Which is just fine.)

    John
     
  7. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    That is a #2 Golok

    3/4 tang.

    Good tools, rough out of the box, kinda short and heavy for true machete type tasks and could greatly benefit from a serious regrinding.

    I'll put up some Martindale related reviews in the next week or so once things dry out around here a bit.

    In the meantime, my favorite Martindale is the 18" 702.
    [​IMG]
     

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  8. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Birds of a feather bro! :cool:

    We do seem to be in remarkable accord in regards to cutting/chopping/stabbing implements and their usage.
     
  9. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    Yikes! I guess I should have done my homework before I dropped $25. I will definitely save my receipt from that one.

    As to the gimmicky thing about the Parang, I would usually steer clear of that stuff too, and im by no means a fan of Grylls, I just really liked the style of that particular knife.

    Seriously, how hard would it have been to make both of those full tang?

    So any other suggestions on other quality blades of similar style?
     
  10. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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  11. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    Can you explain to me why the tang on those is better than the Gerber Parang?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  12. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Auto-correct/complete strikes!!! :D


    The tang on the bidor-built Parang is more than 5/16" thick and has a single 7/32" hole in a non stressed position.

    The tang on the Gerber is 3/32" and has a big hole punched right through a heavily stressed area, leaving very little meat connecting the blade to the tang.

    [​IMG]

    Who knows how many of these things have blown up in peoples faces.
     
  13. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    People obsess about "full tang" when it is not a critical issue. It has become a marketing gimmick far too often when what's important, as pointed out, is the design of the tang, hardness, relationship of holes to mate the grip to the blade. If you through harden the whole chopper, tang and all, and then place your grip holes at stress points you end up with broken tangs unless they're really thick. The width of the tang doesn't help you much since the crack will start at the hole and propagate out the the edge if width is all a tang has going for it.
     
  14. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    Yeah, sorry about that. Fixed it.

    Good to know about the tang thickness being more important than the width.

    How do you find out or know how the blade has been hardened or how much of the blade has been hardened?

    You guys sure are a helpful bunch.
     
  15. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    What do you all think of Condor Knife & Tool parangs? Are they good quality?
     
  16. Snowdog

    Snowdog Member

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    Maybe I'm alone here, but I like my Gerber Parang. It's not among those included in the recall and I'll chopped all sorts of things with it. I've used it when it was obvious the task was better suited for an axe or at least a hatchet. It sailed through without incident.

    I lost most of my concerns of it breaking on me after I cut down a dead tree with it. It took a while and I don't know how many (hundreds?) of hard chops, but the tree came down.

    I've been quite pleased with mine.
     
  17. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    I've done more chopping with HI kuks than anything else, including chopping down a full-sized, very healthy tree (ouch).

    Almost all kukuris have a "rat-tail" tang, which extends most of the way into the handle. The cheapest/easiest way to apply a handle is to heat the tang, and let it burn its way into a block of wood (kuks with this type handle usually need another handle in a couple years). Despite the crudeness of this method, the tang itself rarely breaks. This is the most common type of kuk handle, which is why buying a quality kuk from someone like HI is usually a better investment than a cheaper kuk of unknown quality.

    ANYWAY, my main point is the "full tang" alone isn't an indicator of quality or strength. I even know one well-known maker of handmade knives who has knives that look like full tang, if you don't look very carefully! :D (They're still quality knives.)


    John
     
  18. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Condor is the "premium" brand for El Salvadorian hardware manufacturer IMACASA. Sort of the GMC to the IMACASA Chevrolet.
    http://www.imacasa.com/index-en.php

    Condor tools are generally of quality manufacture but suffer from the occasional lemon and the edges on their heavier blades are often left so thick as to preclude efficient use without a regrind.
    I've got a Condor parang, like so:

    [​IMG]


    .... and it is perfect example of a "sharpened pry bar". I've never gotten around to regrinding it. Out of the box it is a tree-beater.




    That said, the Condor "Bushcraft Parang" is intriguing provided that the grind goes back as far as it looks like it does.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Outside of listed manufacturers specs and a Rockwell tester you can get a general feel for hardness by swiping the blade with a mill file, or if you are a super dork, by using a set of calibrated hardness testing files.

    http://www.amazon.com/industrial-scientific/dp/B001CTI7TE

    We do try. :D
     
  20. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    Sam, that Bushcraft Parang is the one that piqued my interest. I'm looking for something I can throw in a pack, so the longer ones might not be as handy for my purposes.
     
  21. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    That makes a difference.

    Are you looking for a machete or a dedicated chopper?
     
  22. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    I guess kind of an all around tool to keep in my pack that I have with me most of the time. Right now there is a tomahawk in there, but I'm looking for something a little more flexible, more multi-purpose.
    I'm looking for something that fits the tool and last ditch weapon category.
    I'm not really sure if that fits the chopper or machete category better.
    Would I be better served by a differemt style?
     
  23. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Well since you are going to be packing it...if you aren't married to the Parang style there are a great many options available for quality, cheap, relatively short (18" blade or less) chopping tools.

    Your ideal tool is going to be dependent on your intended usage and the makeup of the vegetation that you will be cutting.

    So you are going to have to do a bit of sweating in order to find your ideal.




    That said, I recommend the Imacasa 335 Bolo to everyone as a general purpose, middle of the road, woods loafing tool.
    http://www.baryonyxknife.com/14spbogrop.html
     
  24. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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  25. SuperNaut

    SuperNaut Member

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