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Carrying flasks

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Malamute, Aug 4, 2015.

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  1. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    I've seen pictures of old flasks, they generally had rings on them for a cord to carry the flask over the shoulder, but none of the newer ones do. Are there any more period correct style ones on the market, or has anyone added rings to their modern repro flasks?

    Other than in a pocket or bag, is there another easy way to carry a flask without rings that I've missed?
     
  2. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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  3. Noz

    Noz Member

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    The ones with the carry rings were large capacity flasks that carried more powder than the pistol shooter would need.
     
  4. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    They modern ones look like they drilled holes in the flask and used a cotter key opened up inside as the ring mount. Were the old ones soldered on? For some reason holes in the side of the flask seems weird to me.
     
  5. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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  6. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    I suspect that style came later. Metal was scarce in the early days and especially in the more forward communities as the settlers moved west. I'd suggest that most flasks made from horn used leather shoulder straps with slits and holes in the end that slip over the point and into a carved groove to stay in place. On the other end the wood plug would be fitted and nailed in place with precious brass or iron tacks. The tapered stopper, if it was filled from the plugged end, would have a narrow waist that would lock into the hole and slit on the other end of the leather shoulder strap.
     
  7. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    Not sure what period you meant, but as far as revolvers, I think the flasks were part of the general use package, along with a bullet mold. I wouldnt guess they would be much more difficult to get than the guns, bullet molds and proper caps (not all caps were created equal, they had specific types for different guns, particlularly Colt revolvers). I believe powder horns were more generally used for sporting rifles.
     
  8. INGarand

    INGarand Member

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    I have patterns for leather flask holders, cap boxes, and holsters. I think I got them from the old tandy leather company.
     
  9. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    OK, the "over the shoulder" in the opening post made me think that Malamute was mistakenly calling the powder horn a "flask". If I'm off on that and we're talking about the brass and copper jobbies with the thumb lever and screw on measures then I apologize.
     
  10. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    No biggy.

    I'm really glad for the edit feature. I've come back and looked at some posts I made and thought "Wait, what?!" :)

    I had a belt carrier for a flask, but they arent really period type from what I can tell. It seems either carried in a pocket for the smaller ones or with a cord over the shoulder for medium to larger ones was common back in the day. Thinking on it, having the flask on a cord would seem simplest, as once done, you just let it go rather than have to fish it back into a carrier and secure it. All this is assuming field use, not formal range use where one has handy flat places to lay things and extra widgets to facilitate loading. Where I shoot doesnt have any civilized amenities in any event. Rough rocky ground, irregular rocks for landscaping effect.

    I need to re-borrow the book Packing Iron again.

    Does anyone have the good book about flasks? I've seen it referenced when looking for info but didnt bookmark or save the info. I'm curious how the rings were attached to the old flasks. I'm slightly nervous that less that excellent soldering work may just melt the joint solder and make the flask come apart. I guess a heat sink may work. The cotter key thing may work, and add a little solder to seal it. The cotter key just working around in a hole in a thin copper item seems like it may not be very sturdy in actual use.

    Has anyone tried the Walker/Dragoon flasks that hold spare balls also? How does the ball thing work, and how many does it hold? In reviews it was mentioned that it holds less powder than it first seems because of that, but nobody has really said how much powder they hold or how many balls.
     
  11. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

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    As I recall, the Walker/Dragoon flask holds six balls. I do not recall how much powder but not nearly enough for the appetite of either revolver.

    Kevin
     
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