Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Chain gun stores

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by chorlton, Aug 25, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. chorlton

    chorlton Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Oops, not stores selling chain guns :D
    My question is:
    Is it possible to negotiate on prices with places like Cabelas or Sportsmans Warehouse?
     
  2. Moonclip

    Moonclip Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,766
    Location:
    USA
    Our local chain(Turners) refuses to deal and I find also that even many of the smaller stores will not anymore. Being as it is hard to make a buck in the gun biz I rarely ask anymore anyways.

    If I don't like the price I just don't buy it. I will make exceptions sometimes at someplace like a pawnshop(saved 5 bucks, wow) or if buying multiple guns at the same time.
     
  3. PromptCritical

    PromptCritical Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    382
    Location:
    The State of the Beaver
    As I recall, there is very little markup on guns themselves. My local shop ads a flat 10% over wholesale which I consider very reasonable. Most of the shops money is made selling ammo and other supplies, which no one usually haggles over. This may also be why they always try to sell you extra goodies with the sale of a gun. A guy I know who works in a shop in San Diego told me that the state of Kali makes more money on each sale than the shop does. I don't doubt it. I consider gun shows the only place for negotiating.

    And to answer your question directly, the Sportsmans Warehouse here sells guns for slightly less than the above mentioned shop, so they are in no position to haggle is they still want to make money.
     
  4. brewer90

    brewer90 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I bought a Kimber from Sportman's Warehouse and they wouldn't come down on the price which was pretty low to start with. I found the pistol for $100 cheaper online but the sales guy really knew his stuff and spent well over an hour with me trying out all of their .45's. That extra attention was worth the $100 since I now knew exactly what I wanted and was able to check out the pistol before I bought it.

    Cabela's seemed to be priced much higher than Sportman's. At least here in Austin anyway.
     
  5. Farnham

    Farnham Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2004
    Messages:
    641
    Location:
    Texas
    After that title, I'm SOOO disappointed... :D

    S/F

    Farnham
     
  6. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    24,041
    Location:
    Idahohoho, the jolliest state
    According to my old pal Jim: "You don't always get what you ask for, but you never get what you don't ask for."
     
  7. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    14,248
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    As was stated above, gun stores make very little profit on new firearms. Our local guy usually makes 7-12%. Thats not a whole lot, so I don't really ask him to discount. Sometimes he does because I buy a lot of guns, but I never ask. Used guns are another story. The profit margin on used is usually at least 100%, so they definitely have room to work with you. Most dealers will buy used guns in excellent condition at 1/2 of dealer cost. That means a 98% Springfield loaded will fetch you about $240 if you sell to a shop. They will turn around and sell it for $495.
     
  8. Tejas Gunwerks

    Tejas Gunwerks Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    127
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    As a Dealer, I am always willing to negociate... I'm am, always, willing to raise my prices. :D
     
  9. Spreadfire Arms

    Spreadfire Arms Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,312
    i saw Tejas Gunwerks do that at a gun show, it was pretty funny. :D

    a kid, about 19-21 years old, asked the dealer if he was willing to negotiate on the price of a handgun which was let's say $500.

    dealer said, "sure, i'm always willing to go up. how about $525?"

    kid looks puzzled and stutters - "But--but--that's $25 higher than the marked price."

    dealer replies, "I know, I'm a better negotiator than you!"

    kid...puzzled.....walked away.....very puzzled..... :confused:

    i was too busy laughing to get him to come back!
     
  10. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Messages:
    11,284
    Location:
    TN
    Negotiation for new guns is limited. Frequently it is only a cash vs credit card negotiation from my experience. But, it never hurts to ask. But, if you press them for a lower price, I feel you should make the purchase it they give you a lower price (example> dealer eats the sales tax or something like that.)The profit on guns (like cars) is in used guns, not the new ones.
     
  11. Moonclip

    Moonclip Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,766
    Location:
    USA
    I understand customers can be a bit annoying with the constant lowball offers but after all, that young guy still was a CUSTOMER and after the $25 dollar higher remark, it is quite possible he went to another dealer and bought a gun there if he was more tactful in explaining why he could not or would not knock off anything on the price.

    I had a friend that looked like he didn't have a pot to piss in that actually spent 1000's of dollars a year on guns and for some reason he was kind of sensitive. I know if he would have been given the remark the young kid was given if he asked for a better deal as he usually did, he would have never spend a cent with that particular dealer again.
     
  12. c_yeager

    c_yeager Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2003
    Messages:
    5,479
    Location:
    Seattle
    You can negotiate anywhere. I knew a guy that used to attempt to haggle at grocery stores. he said that he sometimes got a good deal (but he may have been lying). One thing that you can do at chain stores of all kinds is to attempt to get a previous (or upcoming) sale-price on an item.
     
  13. Tejas Gunwerks

    Tejas Gunwerks Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    127
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Where ever you work, what if your Boss came up to you every payday and tried to negociate your salary lower. You have already completed the work, it is payday after all. He can come up with all the lame excuses he can come up with, we didn't make enough money this week, you took too many coffee breaks, I'm in a bad mood. Well...this is what you are doing to me every time you "negociate." If my prices are unreasonable, just walk away. If you can't afford my prices, go get a better paying job. Every "negociation" takes money out of my pocket, I feel no need to live in poverty because you are so cheap. And what's up with "negociation" reaching an agreeable price and then saying "Let me think about it" or "I'll be back" or "I have to go get some money" and the worst "oh, do you take credit cards?" I guess I need to raise my prices, then "negociate" back down to what I really wanted to get in the first place. You will feel better, I'll still be thinking what a moroon :banghead:
     
  14. jdkelly

    jdkelly Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2003
    Messages:
    622
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Not all dealers mark their wares with their lowest price. Most move at least a little, some move alot. If a guy has bad prices or a bad attitude he's not worth my time. It's not like they are selling proprietary equipment.


    Respectfully,

    jdkelly
     
  15. c_yeager

    c_yeager Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2003
    Messages:
    5,479
    Location:
    Seattle
    Big huge problem with your "analogy" is that in the case we are discussing the negotiation is taking place PRIOR to the exchange of goods or services. A more accurate analogy would be if you were to negotiate your salary with your boss prior to the start of your job, this makes perfect sense and happens every day. In fact i would imagine that this is exaclty what takes place every time someone contacts you to perform some gunsmithing.
     
  16. 04SilverSCFX4

    04SilverSCFX4 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    TX
    The dealers around here won't match prices and are usually about 20% more, so I just choose to buy out of state and normally save a few $100.00. The local shops try to screw you on the backside though by charging outrageous transfer fees. When I ordered my 700PSS the local shop was 20.00, no problem. Now the same shop is up to $40.00. I just go to gunsamerica or gunbroker and look up their ffl holders and the transfer fees (my dad charges 10.00 so 15.00 around here is pretty good) and find the cheapest ones. This way I save on the price, don't pay taxes and normally get shipping for free.
     
  17. chorlton

    chorlton Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Well I figure that since this is a chain store I'll be buying from, I'll try walking in with cash and trying to make the sales tax go away. I would be a very happy camper then :) If you don't ask, you don't get, as one of you mentioned.
     
  18. Tejas Gunwerks

    Tejas Gunwerks Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    127
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    My analogy stands as is. You have invested your time and energy working and you expect a resonable returne on your investment. I have invested my money expecting a resonable return on my investement. I does fall apart somewhat because you have a binding contract with your employer and I do not with my customer. Nevertheless, I have a reasonable price in mind on my product. I don't jack my prices up, they are fair. I don't care if you want to defraud the state by not paying taxes, that is between you and the Comptroller, leave me out of it. Most people that negociate will stand in front of you, your item is priced fairly, and ask you to come down. ???? Well, why don't you make a counter offer? I'm not going to lower my prices until I reach what you have in your pocket book. If you had taken the time to do your research my prices are just fine. I had a group of guys come in and wanted to negociate my AR 15s down to about $300.00. They wouldn't beleive me when I told them that was below, way below, what I paid for them. I don't need uninformed customers like that. Some customers just want to bust your chops, because they can. It is refreshing when a customer just says, let's write it up.
     
  19. afasano

    afasano Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Messages:
    255
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Chain gun stores, :D and finestine didn't like my little AR she's really going to be pissed now.
     
  20. TheEgg

    TheEgg Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,363
    Tejas Gunwerks is entitled to charge whatever he wants for his products.

    I am entitled to not purchase from him or anyone else with a 'customers are jerks' attitude.

    Sounds like a win-win all around. :D
     
  21. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    2,957
    Location:
    Nevada, escaped from the PDRK via Idaho.
    The gun shop I used to frequent in CA belonged to a good friend of mine. He generally sold his new wares at 10% above his cost, so there wasn't much bargaining room there. As a result, I watched his used and consignment offerings where he had much more room to negotiate. He knew I would pay cash, which gave him 3-4% to work with over other customers whom he couldn't be sure of how they would pay.

    One thing I learned was to never fall in love with a gun on his shelves until I heard the best price he could give me. One day he had a nice S&W Model 25 in .45 Colt. He said it was $500. I put it back on the shelf. It sold a couple of days later. Three months later the same pistol showed up in the display case. I looked at it curiously and my friend said, yes it was the same revolver. It's owner was hurting for cash and wanted to sell it. I asked, "How much?" My friend said, "$325." By being patient I saved $175.

    Pilgrim
     
  22. chorlton

    chorlton Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Tejas, I wouldn't think of trying to negotiate with an independant store owner, if I saw that the prices were fair. Chain stores, however, are able to have sales and buy in bulk, and are usually fair game. I dont think anyone was suggesting your prices are high or even that you come under the chain store category. Oh, and by "making the sales tax go away" I meant reducing the price to an agreeable level, thats all ;)
     
  23. Control Group

    Control Group Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Messages:
    558
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI, Uniform Districts of America
    This argument is so flawed I almost don't know where to start.

    First, while you've invested your time and energy in your work, you still have the results of that time and energy. If I don't pay your price, you still have the gun, and can sell it to someone else. Once I've worked 40 hours, I can't get those 40 hours back or sell them to someone else, so I expect to get paid at the price we agreed on.

    You're right, though, in that does also fall apart because of the binding contract, but it's a lot more than "somewhat." There is really no parallel between not paying money you've agreed to pay, and trying to reach an agreement on how much money you will pay.

    Additionally, I'm not defrauding the state by not paying sales tax, since I'm not the one being taxed. Sales tax is assessed against the merchant, and it is at the merchant's discretion whether to pass that cost on to the customer (which is, of course, normal practice). Either that, or we're all defrauding the state when we pay for concessions at movies or ballgames, since we're not paying x% over the displayed price.

    You seem to think that your idea of a fair price is the only one. It's not. "Fair" is whatever price you and the customer agree on. That's how this whole "free market" thing works. If you're already pricing your guns rock-bottom, more power to you. Don't lower your price. That doesn't mean it's wrong for someone to negotiate. Do you pay sticker price for cars at a dealership? If you don't your hypocrisy is incredible. If you do, you're getting ripped off.

    You also seem to think that customers should just blindly trust that you're pricing the gun at a "fair" price. I'm sure you're an upstanding guy who would never dream of overpricing his wares to see if someone will pay, and that's commendable. Of course, those of us who don't know you personally have no reason whatsoever to trust you any more than we trust Slick Jim McRipoff at the next table. I'm sorry you have to deal with the terribly offensive practice of asking for a better deal because other sellers are shady, but life's a beach, you know?

    If you don't want to negotiate, that's fine. Put up a sign that says "all prices final," or "no negotiation," or play a looped video tape of Tommy Lee Jones saying "I. Don't. Bargain." But getting all huffy because someone engages in the fairly standard practice of trying to negotiate prices at a gun show is a bit uncalled for.
     
  24. SLCDave

    SLCDave Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    Salt Lake Valley
    I have never bought a gun that I haven't thought about, done some research on, and priced in several different places for at least a couple of weeks beforehand. I know that Sportsman's Warehouse will beat any local price on an in-stock gun, and I only got that information by ASKING. They have done it for me without even calling to verify the price.

    I was in a local shop about a month ago, and I was looking at a handgun in the used case. It was pretty much reasonably priced, but I had $10 less in cash in my pocket. I asked if that price had a little wiggle room, and got blasted before I could explain my reason for asking. I was asking because I was willing to GO GET the extra $ from an ATM if I had to, but I would save my time and effort if they would take a little less. I've seen price haggled in this very shop on several occasions, and bought plenty of ammunition and other items there in the past. Needless to say, I didn't buy the gun, and haven't bought anything there since.

    You do business how you see fit, and I'll spend my money where I'm treated decently. There are enough people out there willing to take my money, so it shouldn't be a chore for me to hand it over.
     
  25. 04SilverSCFX4

    04SilverSCFX4 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    TX
    Here's my thought...I'm in the market for a RRA M4, local shop wants 975.00. I don't bid or bargain, if that's what he charges someone else can pay it. On the other hand, I found an out of state dealer who can sale for 850.00/shipped. Now when I buy, I'm saving 125.00 + 60.00 in tax. So for a little leg work you can save approx 150.00 after paying the transfer fee.

    Sorry, but I make it a habit to buy out of state just to avoid taxes and you normally get a better deal using the various gun listing web-sites/forums.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page