Champfering primer pockets

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by AJC1, Apr 12, 2021.

  1. film495

    film495 Member

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    I got one of those after using a commong chamfer/debur tool for a few hundred pockets. Works much faster - and very inexpensive. So far so good, but I have yet to prime any of that brass, so - for what it is worth.
     
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  2. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    I had both and if priming 223 I had that happen a few times.
     
  3. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    I seated about 400 .223 and some of them
    I just ordered on, I’ll give it a go and pop one in
     
  4. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    AKula69 the RCBS swager I have has two different sized support pins the smaller one fits inside 223 with ease. If you ended up with a used kit missing parts a call to RCBS will get a replacment small rod for no cost.
     
  5. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    This brass doesn't have any swage, it just doesn't have any chamfer at all. Most cases have a little to help the primer align. The reamer tool has a shoulder to help create a small chamfer but I have no desire to remove material from the pocket at all.
     
  6. gifbohane

    gifbohane Member

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    I am reluctant to use this tool -----------100-012-028WB Small Primer Pocket Uniformer since I fear that I will remove too much brass from the pocket. Especially when using the case a second or third time. Also I use a drill and my motion is never consistent nor perpendicular.

    Anyone else?
     
  7. Average Joe

    Average Joe Member

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    With so much brass around, I just trash S&B, Herter's, and CBC brass. Their primer pockets are extremely tight.
     
  8. eb in oregon
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    eb in oregon Contributing Member

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    All brass manufacturers can have a bad day in making their product. The other year I bought 100 Starline nickel plated cases for .32 magnum so as to quickly identify them from .32 S&W Long. The primer pockets were very tight. I ended up pressing the primers in on my arbor press to seat them. If I run into that problem again I think I'll just run them through the press using the RCBS primer pocket swager as it makes all the pockets identical in diameter with a nice rounded lip. If it is an issue with depth the Sinclair tool will fix that.

    Oh, and in contacting Starline about the issue they sent me 50 brass cases to try out. Those primer pockets were spot on.
     
  9. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Life long machinist/mechanic here and the first time I encountered primer crimps I immediately thought of a countersink. Worked excellently. That was 30 years ago and many thousands of cases both handgun and rifle. There are some ammo/brass manufacturers that make primer pockets with very little, no chamfer on the mouth so I have used a plain 60 degree x 1/2" counter sink to add a few thousandths chamfer/taper to the mouth.

    FWIW; I have several Lee Loaders and one kit would pop primers about once or twice per box of reloads. Too much for me (I had to change skivvies too often), 44 Magnum. I chamfered, just broke the corners of the primer pocket and I now get 99.9% "no pops" when priming my 44 Mag. brass on my Lee Loader...

    Most case prep is just plain old Metal Working 101. Cleaning, reshaping, deburring, flaring, etc. is not "reloading specific". I did all these operations in Jr. High Metal Shop many years before I even thought of reloading. K.I.S.S.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
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  10. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    So i used a standard countersink, no problem at all. Just knocked the sharp edge off and put the smallest angle and done. 20210413_104335.jpg the top right brass case is done. Just enough different to really make a difference.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
  11. entropy

    entropy Member

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    S&B's pockets are a little tough to put primers in sometimes. I just go ahead and chamfer them when I get them, no matter the caliber.
     
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  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Won’t hurt a thing done properly
     
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  13. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    That is what I use. It takes a couple twists and you're done. Makes priming a breeze.
     
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  14. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    Nice!
     
  15. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    what size counter sink is that?
     
  16. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    16183359070535083068240466186582.jpg
     
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  17. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    I would NEVER recommend someone drill out primer pockets.
    There are too many tools of all price ranges to do the job.

    Everywhere from $3.99 (Lee) on up to over $100 (Dillon).

    Please proceed with caution.

    Stay safe my friends
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
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  18. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    I have a new drill press in the box. But I haven’t used one since I worked at a machine shop after high school. I might try the counter sink with my hands
     
  19. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    I moved the speed down to 420 rpm. It's not like I needed to remove material. I'm shopping for r25 collets and a collet block so I can start making my own test cases for the hornaday tool. When I have my lathe back in my life things will be much better.
     
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  20. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    I miss working on a Lathe and Mill! most satisfying trade ever. It just didn’t pay enough to make it a career
     
  21. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    The head of the primer is sitting deeper than the low edge of my chamfer. I believe right tool for the job and empirically this seems to be it.
     
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  22. Jonny2guns

    Jonny2guns Member

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    After using the Hornady lock and load, the hand tool sits on the bench for the odd time I don't feel like setting up the Hornady.
     
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  23. Alaskamike

    Alaskamike Member

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    I've used chamfering tools and the RCBS swager tool, and I hugely prefer the swager tools. I had to remove the primer crimp from many hundreds of milsurp .30-06 and 9mm cases, and doing it with the RCBS swager in my single stage press made it go a heck of a lot faster and easier. It's also cheaper than the motorized chamfering tools. I guess you could do it with a drill and the right shape of bit, but that seems pretty easy to really mess things up.
     
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  24. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    Were not even talking about the same thing. Removing a military crimp requires a reamer. In the case of that situation I totally agree swaging makes a ton of sense especially to the nonmachinst type that dont understand tiny tollerance. What I am doing is a finishing process that should have been done in the factory. If you really look at the picture I posted of cases the factory nickle case has a comparable or maybe even slightly larger chamfer. The s and b cases come with a completely square corner on the primer pocket. It's the same on 38. I have not had this issue with the 45 or 9mm or 308 brass.
     
  25. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    That is not true. The crimp was applied after the primer was set. You have options on removing it. I prefer swaging since it does not remove brass from the base, just moves it back to where it came from. It can also be removed by cutting it out. Here you have to be careful not to get carried away. I've trashed a lot of brass where some one removed 20%+ of the primer pocket. Then you have blown primers and top hats on the ones that managed to hold. Done right with the right tool limiting the depth not a problem. But removing brass weakens the base to some degree, all depends on how hard your pushing the pressure.
     
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