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Chips track license plates

Discussion in 'Legal' started by onerifle, Aug 12, 2005.

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  1. onerifle

    onerifle Member

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    Here's my contribution to "good news for the weekend".

    Ummm...NOT. :fire: :cuss:

    This REALLY sucks.



    Wireless World: Chips track license plates

    http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20050812-082018-4885r.htm

    By Gene J. Koprowski
    Published 8/12/2005 10:05 AM


    CHICAGO, Aug. 12 (UPI) -- A controversial plan to embed radio frequency identification chips in license plates in the United Kingdom also may be coming to the United States, experts told UPI's Wireless World.

    The so-called e-Plate, developed by the British firm Hills Numberplates, is a license plate that also transmits a vehicle's unique identification via encryption that can be read by a small detector, whose output can be used locally or communicated to a distant host.

    "RFID is all the rage these days," said Bradley Gross, chairman of Becker & Poliakoff, a law firm in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., "but my fear is that this use of the technology is tracking at its worst."

    The reason for the concern in the legal and privacy-rights communities is that e-plates may expand the ability of police to track individuals by the movement of their vehicles.

    A single RFID reader can identify dozens of vehicles fitted with e-plates moving at any speed at a distance of about 100 yards. The e-plate looks just like a standard plate, but it contains an embedded chip that cannot be seen or removed. It is self-powered with a battery life of up to 10 years.

    "Police will be able to track your every move when you drive," said Liz McIntyre, an RFID expert and author of the forthcoming book, "Spychips: How Major Corporations and the Government Plan to Track Your Every Move With RFID" (Nelson Current, October 2005). "What if they put these readers at a mosque? They could tell who was inside at a worship service by which cars were in the parking lot."

    Indeed, the makers of the technology boast that the e-plates can furnish access control, automated tolling, asset tracking, traffic-flow monitoring and vehicle crime and "non-compliance." The chips can be outfitted with 128 bit encryption to prevent hacking.

    The problem is people other than the vehicle's owner quite often are at the wheel.

    "Will this, ultimately, stop terrorism?" Gross asked. "The occupants of cars change continuously. Terrorists can steal cars."

    Similar technology already has been used in the United States, experts said.

    "The technology side of this is readily available, as it is used in the high-frequency battery-powered transmitters in the toll road systems like Fastrak," said attorney Dave Abel, with the international law firm Squire, Sanders & Dempsey LLP, who was an engineer before coming to the bar. "To use the toll road, a user signs up -- providing name, address, billing info, et cetera, which is stored in a database. Each time they drive past the reader station they are billed or a credit is deducted from an account."

    Security access points could justify the expense, but placing them even at key intersections may not be very practical, according to lawyers at Pittiglio, Rabin, Todd & McGrath in Costa Mesa, Calif., a spokeswoman said.

    The cost of roadside readers is significant -- although the price per chip is estimated to be only 20 cents.

    Some experts said governments already are using the chips embedded in tollway access cards without heed to privacy rights. In Texas, for example, tollway authorities have been "making printouts of the records of every time you pass through a toll booth, what time you passed through," McIntyre said. "The government hasn't established a privacy policy for this, and people are not being informed that they are doing this. This is an instance of Big Brother on the highway."

    --

    Gene Koprowski is a 2005 Lilly Endowment Award Winner for his columns for United Press International. He covers networking and telecommunications for UPI Science News. E-mail:sciencemail@upi.com
    Copyright © 2001-2005 United Press International
     
  2. Greg L

    Greg L Member

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    Metal plates?

    Toss them in the oven for a couple of hours.

    :fire: :cuss:
     
  3. Tropical Z

    Tropical Z Member

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    I wonder if they could be defeated by strong magnets?
     
  4. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

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    I believe a license plate will fit in my microwave quite handily.
     
  5. brian roberts

    brian roberts Member

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    The oven is....

    a GOOD idea......hmmmmmm..... :uhoh: how about the MICROWAVEoven.......?? :cool:
     
  6. R.H. Lee

    R.H. Lee Member

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    Exactly. Disable it and go on with your life.
     
  7. Marnoot

    Marnoot Member

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    Microwave oven would zap it within a few seconds. I'm sure they'd try to make it illegal to "tamper" with them, though.
     
  8. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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    So they going to punish you if it "malfunctions"?

    They have to prove tampering ;)
     
  9. lucky_fool

    lucky_fool Member

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    To heck with that, terrorists can steal license plates. It'd be a lot easier to get the plates off a car in the long-term parking lot of an airport than it would be to swipe the whole car.
     
  10. R.H. Lee

    R.H. Lee Member

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    They should be put on notice that there is widespread, willful destruction of the devices. Let 'em lock us all up, if they can.
     
  11. thorn726

    thorn726 Member

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    there you go.

    plenty of ways to disable it, and well, it wasnt our fault.

    come and get all of us.

    the real pain is where will all the $$ come from
     
  12. bg

    bg Member

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    When you find out, let me know..
    My plate has been known to fall off my truck once in a while. I have to
    take a "hammer" and straighten it out........ :D
     
  13. hkOrion

    hkOrion Member

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    They won't have to - one, two high profile cases where someone gets felony charges for tampering and people will fall in line. Just like the music pirating cases. They'll go after people who can't afford to defend themselves and scare the rest of the population into submission.
     
  14. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    Yeah, and it'll cure baldness, obesity, and cancer, too. No doubt about it.
     
  15. hifi

    hifi member

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    More incrementalism in our never ending march towards the police state and massive government tracking, spying and taxation of the citizenry. Some will 'resist', but most people will not know or care.

    Microwave your plate. Sure, that will make a difference... :rolleyes:

    By the way, we're all being tracked through our cellphones already you know. How many of you are going to microwave your cellphone? In fact cell phone companies will not even activate old phones that don't have a GPS chip in them anymore. 'By law'.

    The water in the pot just rose another degree. The frog doesn't notice.
     
  16. Flyboy

    Flyboy Member

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    And to think that people who opposed the very idea of license plates were called crazy when they expressed concern that the police would start checking plates as a matter of routine.

    No, there's no slippery slope here.
     
  17. Remington788

    Remington788 Member

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    Thats why I still have my old non-GPS phone and will NOT get a new one.

    As for the license plate chip, just have some people make some really strong electro-magnets and just fry the chips at your local wal-mart, k-mart or some other parking lot.
     
  18. KriegHund

    KriegHund Member

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    i dont see how it even matters.

    Matters as in it wont stop srime and terrorism, and it wont affect us aside from extra cost.

    That said it bugs the heck out of me that they are considering this.
     
  19. captain obvious

    captain obvious Member

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    Hey Remmington - what model phone do you have?

    I just stopped using them entirely, cause of that, the general PITA factor, and I got tired of having to replace them when they eventually broke or were somehow destroyed.
     
  20. hillbilly

    hillbilly Member

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    I don't have a cell phone.

    hillbilly
     
  21. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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    They don't need a "GPS Chip" in your phone to track you (in fact few phones have bulit in GPS)

    They can track you by triangulating the signal to 3 cell towers.
     
  22. dustind

    dustind Member

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    Any metal in a microwave will cause sparks and flames, do not try this at (or atleast inside of) home.

    The thought that RFID license plates would affect terrorists or criminals is just absurd.
     
  23. DRZinn

    DRZinn Member

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    In a pot of water, 200 degrees and rising slowly..
    Ummm... I don't think that's true. Got a source?
     
  24. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    Watch out for a "terrorist attack" using an automobile. That'll likely precede the implementation of this great scheme. Then, after they find that tracking license plates isn't working - they'll chip us.
     
  25. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    The phase triangulation method for locating phones was pretty much of a bust. There is simply to much multipath scattering in urban areas for the method to produce the desired results, and in m,any rural areas you may not be within range of enough towers (2 min, 3 is better) to even get a fix.
    Most of the newer phones have enough GPS to report the location for 911 service. A number of companies have even been using them to monitor outside workers.
     
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