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Civil War, Colt 1862 Percussion Rifle

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by SLCscottie, Jun 26, 2011.

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  1. SLCscottie

    SLCscottie Member

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    Hi guys. I need your help in identifying the value of this inherited Civil War Rifle.
    I heard from one gentleman that it may be a "Wall Hanger". And may be worth $700 to $800.


    Colt U.S. 1862
    Colt's PIF A MFG
    Hartford, CT


    What do you guys think?
     

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  2. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    That's what's known as a "Model 1861 Special" rifle-musket. These were made by Colt and two other contractors, and are hybrids of regular 1861 Springfield, and Enfield, features (it had something to do with the availability of Robbins & Lawrence machinery that had been designed to produce Enfields).

    From the pictures, it doesn't look like yours is in very good condition. Still, as an original, it should be worth at least the $700-800 quoted.
     
  3. SLCscottie

    SLCscottie Member

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    Thank you AA

    I appreciate the feed back.
     
  4. Ryanxia

    Ryanxia Member

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    Seems like a decent rifle, always remember to be careful when listening to facts from a potential buyer.
     
  5. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    The barrel looks too short; it should be 40 inches with three barrel bands. I note the bolster is rusted so it is not possible to tell if the gun was accepted by the government (eagle on bolster) or made up from reject parts and sold by Colt (no eagle).

    Jim
     
  6. SLCscottie

    SLCscottie Member

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    I'm hearing that it is a two band artillery musket.
     
  7. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    My sources, including Flayderman and Houze, do not indicate that there was any "artillery model" version of the 1861 Special and the term is often used by modern dealers to "legitimatize" any cut down musket. I am willing to be educated on that, though, and will welcome input from anyone with better knowledge.

    Jim
     
  8. Leatherman-Cowboy

    Leatherman-Cowboy Member

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    SLCscottie
    Just to be able to hold an original rifle from the civil war is rush.I dont think you can place a value on American history like that.I have a reproduction of that rifle and paid $750 for,so to have the real thing-wow.Dollar's dont tell story's-the rifle does.
    Just my opinion.
    Thank you,
    Henry
     
  9. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    Colt itself marketed a reproduction of that musket some years ago, as part of their "Signature Series" (Sam Colt's signature on the trigger guard). I have one. Unfortunately, the gun was actually produced by Armi Sport (Armi Chiappa), with all of that firm's notorious inattention to authenticity.
     
  10. SLCscottie

    SLCscottie Member

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    Thanks for sharing your perspective LC. I can see your passion for the history. When I first glanced at these different items of inheritance, I had know idea this one was so valuable in so many ways.
     
  11. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    You are right, LC, and we all feel the same. The problem is that for one buying (not inheriting) any antique, the value arises not only from the fact that the item is historic, but that it is essentially unaltered from the original. That is the same with any antique or collectible. We often hear on "The Antique Roadshow" comments to the effect that "if it had not been sanded/cleaned/cut down/altered it would be worth..."

    Unfortunately, many buyers will be told that an item is original and pay accordingly, only to find that it has been altered and the true value is much less than the person paid for it.

    So "the feel of history" is real, but that alone does not translate into money; authenticity and condition do.

    Jim
     
  12. Leatherman-Cowboy

    Leatherman-Cowboy Member

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    SLCscottie
    My pleasure.I had a chance to hold a Civil sword from my buddy's great gran pa-his name on it-and what a treat.I would never part with something like that.
    Enjoy the gift,most never will get to experience that.
    Thank you,
    Henry
     
  13. Leatherman-Cowboy

    Leatherman-Cowboy Member

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    Jim Keenan
    You are correct-I see that all the time on that show also.Problem is that people rarely know what they have,and some help clean it up,only to find out that was the wrong thing to do.
    Thank you,
    Henry
     
  14. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Off topic, but there is an old joke about the Antiques Roadshow.

    The expert is holding a large oriental vase and saying,

    "This is a fine example of a vase from the Zing dynasty and at auction it would bring at least three mil.... Ooops!"

    Craaassssshhh!

    "As I was saying, had it been genuine..."

    Jim
     
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