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Color me Clueless

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Olon, Nov 9, 2018.

  1. Olon

    Olon Member

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    Alright, so I bought this gun a few weeks back. Winchester model 70 (in .270). As far as I can tell, the gun was made in the early 70s though it seems Winchester Serial number ID is pretty poor. It starts with a G and is in the late 200,000s. It says "classic sporter" on the barrel and has the big, non-rotating claw for the extractor (by that I mean the claw remains at the same orientation regardless of bolt rotation). Controlled feed I believe it's called. Non-detachable magazine as well.

    My question is this: is the stock real wood? Seems like a dumb question but I don't know if it is wood or plastic that has the appearance of wood. It's nice and heavy, but without scratching it up I have no idea how to tell. Not really a critical thing for me to know, but I'd like to anyway. The surface is just so smooth and shiny I have a hard time believing that it is solid wood.

    Maybe some of you who know more about these rifles an fill me in.

    As always, thanks for your input!
     

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  2. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    Hmmmm.....sure looks like real wood to me.

    I'm sure a Winchester expert will chime in here shortly, but as far as I know they stopped using the controlled-feed Mauser action in '64.

    In any case, it's a gorgeous rifle, nice find!
     
  3. <*(((><
    • Contributing Member

    <*(((>< Contributing Member

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    Real Winchester high quality wood. Pretty ain't it. That's a fine bolt gun you bought yourself.
     
  4. Olon

    Olon Member

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    Thanks! Can't wait to bag a deer with it this weekend. Will be the first time shooting a deer with a gun of my own so I'm looking forward to it. So far I'm very pleased with it.
     
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  5. DannyLandrum

    DannyLandrum Member

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    Winchester 70s now use a "controlled round push feed", which is as the name implies, a hybrid of sorts. But if anything it's more controlled than push. The bottom of the bolt face is opened up and the rim of the round slides up and into the extractor as it goes forward, but you can still single-feed by popping the extractor over the rim upon closing if you want to. I cannot recall the history of the "in between" time period (64 until the 2000s when they changed to this system) - seems like there was a mish mash of mostly push-feeds.

    Yep, as mentioned, that's wood and yep, it's beautiful.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
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  6. <*(((><
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    <*(((>< Contributing Member

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    Yes, the true controlled round feed was dropped with their cost changes made post '64. They now have a semi-CRF version of it today.

    Looks like danny beat me too it.

    And if that's your first hunting rifle you own, you picked a winner.
     
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  7. Olon

    Olon Member

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    @DannyLandrum I think you hit the nail on the head. I have the option of placing one in the chamber and moving the bolt forward. It offers quite a bit more resistance so I guess that's from pushing the claw over the end of the case. Thanks for the reply.
     
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  8. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

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    http://www.leeroysramblings.com/winchester_post_64_model_70.html
    That's a nice looking rifle, Olon. I don't think it was built in the "early 70s" though. AFAIK, Winchester discontinued using "Mauser" type claw extractors on their Model 70s in 1964, and started again in 1992.
    As others have said, Winchester 70s nowadays use a sort of "controlled round push feed," or "semi-controlled round feed." My wife's early 2000s Model 70 has that type of feed, and if anything, I like it better than the genuine, controlled round feed of my pre-64 (mid '50s) Model 70. It seems smoother.
    At any rate, yeah, I'm pretty sure that's a real wood stock. It looks an awful lot like the wood stock on my wife's Model 70. Except my wife is only 5'1" tall, so her Model 70 stock is a lot shorter. Which was a real pain, because when my wife had the stock shortened, the guy had cut so much off he got into the cheek-piece, so he had to reshape that too. It turned out real nice though, in spite of the fact that the rifle is kinda odd looking with its 25" barrel and stubby stock.:)
     
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  9. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    If you take off the butt pad you should be able to see the end grain if it’s real live wood
     
  10. If1HitU

    If1HitU Member

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    Nice looking Model 70 Winchester bolt action rifle congrats.:thumbup::thumbup:
     
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  11. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    Hey Olon, as has been said here, nice rifle. I noticed you said you've had it a few weeks... how's it shooting? Got your zero?
     
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  12. 303 hunter

    303 hunter Member

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    Great find, congrats!
     
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  13. Olon

    Olon Member

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    Thanks! Yup, shoots like a dream. Dialed it in as well. Pretty happy considering the roof of my car was my bench ;)
     
  14. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

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    Winchester reintroduced the controlled feed Model 70 action in 1992 and it was produced through 2006. In October 2007 FN Herstal continued making the Model 70 with the controlled feed action. Your rifle does have a wood stock and was manufactured in 1992 or later. Six digit serial numbers were manufactured from 1994 through 1999, so if you have a rifle with G followed by 6 digits it was produced sometime in the years 1994 through 1999. Your rifle appears to be manufactured early in that period because the serial number went to 7 digits after 1999.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
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  15. BigBore44

    BigBore44 Member

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    If you want to know if it’s real wood, remove the barreled action and look. But it’s real. And they’re great rifles. I have the same rifle (Classic Sporter LT) in 30-06. And it’s the only rifle I own that shoots (accurately) whatever I have fed it. And the action is almost as smooth as a Krag.
     
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  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    The "Classics" were made 1992-2006. They are essentially a copy of the Pre-64 with some very minor changes. It is true CRF. The fact that the extractor is modified to allow single feeding does nothing to change the fact that it is CRF. People have been making that modification to Mauser rifles since WW-1 and those are still considered CRF. Winchester developed the WSSM rounds at about the same time and those short stubby rounds would not feed through a true CRF action. Not to be confused with the WSM's, those were CRF. Those were the only " Controlled round push feed versions ever made. And there were only a handful of them. They didn't sell well.

    The original Ruger made from 1977-1992 was not true CRF either. Although it had the claw extractor, it still retained a button ejector. The MK-II introduced in 1992 was initially not true CRF either. But that changed rather quickly, they only made a handful before changing the bolt face to make them true CRF.

    When 1st introduced the Classics were very good rifles, but as production came to an end in 2006 the last few years were spotty as to quality. Most were just fine, but the closer you get to a 2006 manufacturing date the greater chance of a lemon. Those produced in the 1990's (those with 6 digit SN's) are highly sought after and from a practical perspective are BETTER than the Pre-64's. And most command a higher price than common Pre-64's. Only the Pre WW-2 model 70's, or those in rare cartridges or configurations command collector prices anymore. During the 1970's and 80's any Pre-64 brought a premium since it was the only option for CRF. But since Winchester brought it back as well as Ruger and Kimber common Pre-64 model 70's have lost a lot of value.

    Winchester closed in 2006 and no model 70's were made until FN resumed production in late 2008. The FN rifles are similar to the Classics and Pre-64's, but with several modifications. The trigger most notably. The older trigger was as simple and rugged as possible, but often needed some work to be smooth and light. The new trigger has a much better "feel" out of the box, but is much more complex and a lot of guys don't like it. Preferring the rugged reliability of the old style.

    That is a nice rifle. You've stumbled onto one of the best rifles ever made. I'd choose an early Classic model 70 over any rifle ever made. Including a Pre-64.
     
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  17. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

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    This statement is opinion based on small talk. If someone has a bad experience with one pre 64 Model 70 rifle that is no basis for talking down the other 500,000 that were produced. The one practical reason I can think of for buying a post 64 Model 70 is that they may be bought at a lower price, and that is opinion also.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
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