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Colt Combat Commander value?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by bikemutt, May 10, 2015.

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  1. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    I'm considering picking up a Colt Combat Commander 1979 vintage pistol in mint condition. It's the lightweight model. Wondering if anyone here has an idea what something like this sells for these days?

    Thanks.
     
  2. moxie

    moxie Member

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    A "Combat Commander" is all steel.

    The aluminum framed version is called either just the "Commander" or the "Lightweight Commander." Either one of these will have a serial number prefix of LW.

    Be sure that this is indeed the one you want.

    They are selling in the neighborhood of $850.00-$1000.00, I believe, but better to check all the auction sites.

    If you do get one, consider a "drop-in" Wilson beavertail. The stock grip safety tends to chew up your thumb knuckle. Feels better with it too.
     
  3. CaptHank

    CaptHank Member

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    Bikemutt.... I have two Combat Commanders. Both, have had modifications.
     

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  4. BlindJustice

    BlindJustice Member

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    The 70 Series is desired because it doesn't have the 80 Series Firing Pin
    Safety (FPS) which adds some to the trigger pull.

    The original Commander 1950 an alum. alloy frame <-- first alloy frame
    made in USA & first 9x19 though it's always been avail. in .38 SSUper
    & .45 ACP 1970 Combat Commander got the steel frame. Some of
    the Combat Commanders had a satin nickel finish which had flaking i
    issues.

    I had a Combat Commander in the '70s and it did 'bite' the web of
    the shooting hand now and then. & once in a while it would stove
    pipe a round which is wy many 1911 variants have an enlarged &
    flared at the rear vertical ejection port.

    FYI - the 1991 Series has a raised tang with a notch for the hammer
    when cocked and they enlarged the ejection port but not flared.

    R-
     
  5. HisSoldier

    HisSoldier Member

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    My first gun, at age 21, a Colt's Combat Commander, all steel alloy.(Yep, all guns except plastic ones are made of alloy.) I didn't want an aluminum alloy gun because even then I knew how aluminum alloys compare to steel alloys in the wear aspect, the only advantage of aluminum being weight. I had that gun for 20 years.
    About twenty years after selling it I started back into guns by buying another Colt, an all stainless Commander. Now, the series 80 all stainless alloy guns are called "Commander" not "Combat Commander".

    Weird of Colt to not stay consistent.

    Another five years later and I found out how a really well made 1911 type handgun is fitted. I bought my first Dan Wesson.

    BTW, I still have the stainless Commander, I did remove that superfluous firing pin safety.
     
  6. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Combat Commander in .45 ACP
    guns2015_zpsd8ea9d43.jpg

    Commander in .38 Super
    guns2037_zps6010dc72.gif
     
  7. RUT

    RUT Member

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  8. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    bikemutt

    I would think a Combat Commander or a Lightweight Commander in decent shape from 1979 would probably be priced at somewhere around $1000.
     
  9. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    Thanks THR, I'll see what the seller comes up with and proceed accordingly. I also posted about a Python he's wanting to let go in the revolver forum. I don't "need" either of these but since I know this fellow quite well, and know the history of the handguns, I may bite if the price is right.
     
  10. moxie

    moxie Member

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    FWIW, the fact that steel is an alloy is usually treated as a "given" by most people, since all steel is always an alloy of at least 2 elements, iron and carbon. Many people don't even consider basic carbon steel an alloy at all, reserving that term for carbon steel to which one or more other elements have been added to make it stronger, more ductile, or stainless. Referring to stainless steel as stainless alloy steel is just redundant.

    Aluminum, on the other hand, exists as an element. And it can be an alloy as well, and usually is. So the fast that it is as alloy is usually assumed as well in normal conversation.

    Finally, the specific aluminum alloy Colt used for the Commander was called "Coltalloy."

    So typically, but not always, metal gun frames are referred to as steel or aluminum, without needlessly adding the fact they are alloys. Serves no purpose.
     
  11. Chocolate Bayou

    Chocolate Bayou Member

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    steel alloys

    In my business I deal with steel alloys quite a bitand most steel alloys are much stronger than standard and usually are much more money. The most common steel alloys have nickel and mollybendrum or chrome alloys. Also just heat treating steel and then quenching in water will make the steel much harder, but I have never seen either being done to any type of gun in the manufacturing process as both are quite expensive and would add nothing to the gun.
     
  12. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    My father's original Combat Commander wasn't very accurate. But a match-grade bushing and Wilson Group Gripper fixed that. I love that pistol. I grew up shooting it.
     
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