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Colt timing issues?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by KarateHottie93, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. KarateHottie93

    KarateHottie93 Member

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    I have a new Cobra that I'm very proud of. It's had almost 1000 rounds with no issues. One thing I have noticed though is timing.

    Just like any old Colt I've ever paid attention to, this one doesn't fully lock the cylinder when slow cocked. It does when the trigger is pulled all the way back though. I read a lot online that this is definitely a problem. I'm a bit concerned by the fact that if I just VERY lightly pull the trigger...just enough to disengage the sear it doesn't even lock into place then. I don't know that I could replicate that light of a pull while actually shooting though.

    The thing is I also read and hear that the part about slow cocking not locking the cylinder into place is common with most Colts. It's definitely been that way with any that I can remember looking at. I'm puzzled here. Mine is definitely dickered but not sure how much. I mean it shoots perfect and I can't imagine ever pulling it so light while actually shooting that it doesn't finish locking.

    Edit: Just wanted to add that it's certainly gotten at least somewhat better over time. I'm not sure if it's necessarily something that can "wear" itself into timing or not but it catches more often than it first did.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020
  2. BBarn

    BBarn Member

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    I bought a new Anaconda that had timing issues. Seems to be a recurring issue with some of their DA designs. Hope you can get it corrected. Make sure the sideplate screws remain tight.
     
  3. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    I cant speak to the new production Colt revolvers, but it is perfectly normal for a vintage one to not achieve full lockup until the trigger is pulled (and held).
     
  4. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    Wasn't there a comment about that in the latest American Rifleman (their new product review) a few months ago?
     
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  5. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    Normal or not, it isn't safe. You set up "fanner" S.A.s to be short for lockup because of the way they are used (they rely on "coast" (old tuner parlance for inertia). A factory offering should not risk firing out of battery. That is the danger of a "fanner" winding up in "unknowing" hands.

    Mike
     
  6. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    Fair enough.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
  7. RevolvingGarbage

    RevolvingGarbage Member

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    I feel very special now. I can’t get my Cobra (1966) to achieve less than total lock up on any chamber no matter how slowly it’s cocked in single action or in slow pull double action. With chambers empty no less.

    My wonderful S&W Military & Police .38 (1949) will fail either test with empty chambers and it never shaves bullets or has any lack of accuracy.

    23783A02-2BE8-4969-ADC6-4065F9CA9AF6.jpeg
     
  8. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    A S&W bolt should snap into place just before the hammer is fully cocked- even if a slight drag is placed on the cylinder. If it doesnt, it may still coast into battery, but it really should be looked at and tuned up.

    Thats a super clean Cobra, nice!

    BTW, did you ever notice that the Colt action can be cycled with the cylinder open? :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020
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  9. RevolvingGarbage

    RevolvingGarbage Member

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    I believe most makes of revolver other than smith and Wesson and probably Taurus/Rossi since they are mechanically similar will function in an “open” condition. Webley, Enfield, Colt, iver johnson etc and my one liege Bulldog will all function open.

    My M&P has a definite carryup problem but fortunately it only presents its self with the gun totally empty. One day I’ll get the parts and get it back in time.

    And thanks! It shoots even better than it looks :thumbup:
     
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  10. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    I think that it's mostly the small frame DA revolvers that exhibit timing problems because the ratchet and hand are smaller and wear causes timing issues more easily.
    I owned a nice old Colt New Service in the 1980s that had fine DA and SA timing despite being a WW1 veteran.
    The timing was right on even if a small amount of drag was applied to the cylinder with my thumb.
     
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  11. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    If any modern Colt DA revolver fails to fully lock when the hammer is cocked or the trigger is pulled, it's out of time.
    Yes, some came from the factory like that but it's a factory defect.

    With that said, as long as it DOES fully lock up when the trigger is pulled it's safe to use.
    To check for proper timing always put empty cases in the chambers to insure there's no rotational movement of the ejector.

    If you have a current manufacture New Cobra and it's not fully locking, send it back to Colt for warranty repair.

    The older Colt's and the newest models like the New Cobra, New King Cobra, and 2020 Python are intended to fully lock by the hand PUSHING the cylinder into lock up as long as the trigger is being pulled.

    The Mark III, Mark V, original King Cobra, and Anaconda have a hand that does NOT push the cylinder as long as the trigger is pulled. In those models the hand operates like a S&W..... It' s the WIDTH of the hand that pushes the cylinder into lock up and once locked pulling the trigger will not lock it any tighter.

    The Colt actions were advertised as having a safety feature in that with the hammer cocked the cylinder cannot be opened OR if the cylinder is open and the hammer is cocked, the cylinder can't close.
     
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  12. KarateHottie93

    KarateHottie93 Member

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    I know about the S&W hand ones being different and all but I wasn't sure how these are meant to me. I have to cock it extremely slowly to get it to not lock at this point, at least while empty. With live ammo weighing the cylinder down, it's a bit harder. Yes I know I shouldn't be checking the timing with live ammo. I can say though that with live ammo, it's doing it much less often now. If I put the orange chamber indicator in, it drags really bad and and becomes even more common.

    I'm torn on this. It's definitely not near as bad as at first but I definitely want it to function perfectly. I don't wanna part from it for that long though.

    Edit:
    Just caught this part when scrolling back through. This really eases my mind lol. Didn't wanna feel obligated to send it in.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
  13. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    Actually, the hand has two fingers that purely advance the cylinder. The top one starts carry up and the second one finishes it. If the bolt doesn't engage the locking notch, the cylinder would/and could be rotated. The primary function of the bolt on S.A. or D.A. revolvers is to lock the cylinder in battery.
    As far as the 1877 and 78 Colt D.A. revolvers are concerned, they in fact do have a bolt (it protrudes through the recoil shield) that engages the locking notches on the rear of the cylinder.

    Firing out of battery is more apt to happen in revolvers that fire ammo with large primers rather than small primers. I was trying to show reason in general (other than the fact that there is a timing problem). Obviously, the other problem is a ftf if the cyl is out of battery.

    Mike
     
  14. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    My Dan Wesson's do, too. :)

    Stay safe.
     
  15. dbluefish

    dbluefish Member

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    OK! New revolver owner here(new Colt Cobra). So pardon my ignorance. At the range the gun shot fine, DA or SA and was more accurate than I am. When I pull the trigger back slowly, after about 1/8 of the trigger travel, I can spin the cylinder but a hair more and everything locks up fine. It otherwise seems to operate perfectly fine. Are you folks saying this is an issue? I mean I would never, at the range or in self defense have any reason to do other than pull the trigger all the way. I love the gun in any case.

    Semper Fi

    paul
     
  16. KarateHottie93

    KarateHottie93 Member

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    That's what mine does, along with any old Colt I've looked at with the same action. I believe they're saying this is normal as pulling the trigger will rotate it the rest of the way.
     
  17. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    Ummm . . . so yes, typically, when You pull the trigger on a D.A., the trigger actually pulls the bolt down . . . out of the locking notch which frees the cylinder to rotate the next cartridge to battery. Simultaneously, the hammer is being pulled to the rear. The trigger then drops the bolt so that it can lock the cyl for the next firing. The culmination of the trigger pull is a fully cycled action which means the cyl has been locked into battery with the hammer falling forward to ignite the cartridge in battery.

    It's all about timing !!!

    Mike
     
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