Quantcast
  1. Upgrade efforts paused for now. Thanks for your patience. More details in the thread in Tech Support for those who are interested.
    Dismiss Notice

Columbia, SC police department adopting FN FNS-9

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Fishbed77, Aug 23, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    3,574
    .45 ACP is not a difficult round to shoot well. Jeff Cooper's daughter shot it well.
    I had a girlfriend who preferred my .45 to any other pistol.
    .45 Tupperware guns aren't a lot of fun to shoot because they are too light for their caliber.
    If qualification scores are a problem with the .45, then more training is needed. To be honest, most departments should give more training.
     
  2. surratt95

    surratt95 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Elgin, SC
    When you can't get your own employees to carry your guns. That says all I need to know.
     
  3. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Messages:
    211
    I don't trust FN's polymer pistols. I don't think they do enough testing before releasing them, and every FN polymer pistol other than the Five-seveN has had design issues that could stop the pistol from functioning.

    -FNS:

    http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/my-take-on-the-fn-s-striker-fire-pistol

    -The FNX had issues where the trigger would not release the hammer in the DA pull if the pistol got "hot", as in sitting in the sunlight for a matter of minutes.

    -The FNP-45 had issues where the trigger pin would walk out seizing up the pistol, not allowing the trigger to be pulled, the hammer to be cocked, or the slide to be racked.

    -The FNP had issues with the sear housing cracking.

    I never looked into the Forty Nine, but a quick search on Google turns up some first hand reports of people having design related issues with them as well. Trust them if you want, but given the previous issues they have had with almost every model of polymer pistol they have made, I personally would give any new polymer pistol from FN at least a few years on the market before I would trust it.
     
  4. PabloJ

    PabloJ member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,414
    Belgian choks are much better then their modern guns. The two Belgian standouts were FAL and FNMAG. The P-35 pistole does not count because it was American design.
     
  5. NG VI

    NG VI Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2007
    Messages:
    4,883
    Location:
    Maine
    Had an FNP-9M that was outstanding.

    Never an issue, accurate, comfortable in the hand, ideal size for a carry gun larger than the Glock 26/27 or the non-service subcompacts/pocket pistols, I loved that gun.

    Can't imagine the FNS will be a poor choice for a police department.
     
  6. HorseSoldier

    HorseSoldier Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,297
    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    Don't know about Columbia PD's experience with Sig, but a friend of mine is in an agency that dropped Sigs five or six years ago in favor of Glocks because Sig's customer service for their agency was just atrocious. He didn't think there was much to complain about in switching from 220s to (if I remember right) 40 cal Glocks.

    By the time it reached production the High Power was much more a product of Saive than Browning, who died well before the finished product was completed.
     
  7. NG VI

    NG VI Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2007
    Messages:
    4,883
    Location:
    Maine
    And it doesn't count as an American product if it is designed and built by a Belgian manufacturer's employees, regardless of their country of origin.
     
  8. wristtwister

    wristtwister Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    419
    I had a .40 cal FNP that shot great, but it was a little "clunky" as far as being a "carry gun"... of course, I didn't have an outside holster with all my old cop toys hanging off of it either. As a service weapon, I'm sure it would have been great, and the 9MM might function as well... but I'm not a fan of going to smaller bullets. If you're going to do police work, you have to be able to make the tools you use work for you.

    I certainly wouldn't trade a Sig .45 for an FN 9MM if I was an operations officer. I'd want the biggest, ugliest bullet out there... and while 9's are fun to shoot, I wouldn't want to stake my life on one doing cop work "on the street" on a 9MM. A .45 has an excellent record of putting troublemakers down for the count... and in today's world... you want to keep them down.

    WT
     
  9. sigarms228

    sigarms228 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,222
    Location:
    Illinois
  10. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2009
    Messages:
    5,379
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    I'm sure this will do fine. Departments buy new guns from time to time. Realistically a 9mm striker fired polymer gun is a good choice for a department to go to, and for their purposes just about any of them on the market from a major manufacturer would do just as good.

    FNS, Ruger SR9, Springfield XDm, Glock 17, S&W M&P, Walther P99 - whatever. These are working guns. Concealment isn't an issue and they're not looking for enjoyable range time. They just need it to work, and pretty much all of them do these days.
     
  11. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    Messages:
    5,144
    I can see how that could be a potential problem with a dud round. The tap part of clearing drills could knock the trigger forward causing it to lock up. That is something that shouldn't be in a pistol from a company with such a large reputation.
     
  12. legumeofterror

    legumeofterror Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Messages:
    43
    Dieudonné Saive, who worked on the pistol for 8 years after Browning's death and designed the magazine, would beg to differ.
     
  13. NG VI

    NG VI Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2007
    Messages:
    4,883
    Location:
    Maine

    So would the people paying their salaries, thus owning all of their workplace intellectual property.

    Such as firearms and machinery to produce them.
     
  14. Sox

    Sox Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    394
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Good for FN!!! They are innovative, responsive and coming out with new things all the time.

    There was talk of a compact .45 G19 size a while back. FN website has specs for a the compacts listed, but no photos yet. Spoke to a rep and I frankly asked did it remind you of G19 or a G26. He said, think more G26 ish.

    Best
     
  15. barnbwt

    barnbwt member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2011
    Messages:
    7,340
    I'll trust that the issues you described are real, though I never heard of them researching the FNX/FNP I ended up not buying (for a Five-seveN instead). FWIW, the vaunted Five-seveN had (s) a stupid design flaw that can tie it up extremely easily;

    On my second range trip, I guess the top-most round in the mag wasn't fully back. Upon inserting the mag, the tip of the round snagged the mag-release spring, and popped it right out! The instant I removed the mag, the spring and release catch fell to the ground. No positive way to hold the mag in anymore (without your hand, I guess). No way to drop the hammer on a chambered round without a mag in the well (mag safety). If someone was doing tac-reloads where they might not be carefully tapping every mag against their boot before loading, this issue could easily come up.

    To their credit, FNH realized the issue, and developed a quality fix, which they promptly sent me free of charge. Replaced with a machined leaf spring was the cheesy bent paperclip that was the mag release return spring.

    My point is, nearly all gun designs (especially new ones) have issues. The FNP and FNX are today highly respected in the identically-performing-polymer-pistol category. Heck, the Beretta 92 series had it's share of teething issues, as I recall, and they have legions (literally) of fans today.

    TCB
     
  16. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Messages:
    211
    They are real (or they were at one point in time). I don't follow FN's pistols closely enough to know if the issues have been resolved, but there were multiple people reporting that they had the issues I mentioned in their own pistols.

    If this is true, then FN has yet to release a polymer pistol model that has been free from design related issues since its release.

    Personally, I wouldn't trust a new model of polymer pistol from FN until it was on the market for a matter of years first, with no reported issues waiting to be resolved.
     
  17. HOOfan_1

    HOOfan_1 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    4,700
    Location:
    Virginia
    Glock Gen 4s had problems when first released. Smith and Wesson Sigma had problems when first released.

    New designs have problems. I have an FNP-40 and have 1800 rounds through it without a single hiccup. So do countless other people in the world.
     
  18. solvability

    solvability Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2003
    Messages:
    372
    Location:
    HSV, AL.
    Lot of crime there - will be interesting if they have them in a year.
     
  19. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    Messages:
    5,144
    That was more related to the wrong spring weight. What is with FN is a design flaw from the blue prints with that trigger issue.
     
  20. One_Jackal

    One_Jackal member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    Messages:
    542
    Many people like the 5.56 because it's easy to carry a bunch of ammo. Personally, no one can convince me that the 5.56 is a decent defense weapon. Yet the same voices say a 9mm is not adequate. The 9mm has all the same qualities of the 5.56. You can carry a bunch of ammo. The weapons are all high capacity. The 9mm has very little recoil from a full size service weapon. Yet everyone says it's not adequate. Go figure...
     
  21. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    Messages:
    5,144
    There is more to 5.56 than just being able to carry more ammo and less recoil.
     
  22. CornCod

    CornCod Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2006
    Messages:
    839
    Well, the P-35 (BHP) was a partial John Moses Browning design. Dieudonné Saive had as much to do with it as Browning.
     
  23. Fishbed77

    Fishbed77 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,129
    Just a little update... Was out at the Greek Festival today in downtown Columbia and noticed that every cop I saw was wearing a new FNS pistol, so it looks like the gun has been widely issued at this point.

    None of them had a terrifed look on his or her face from being "under-gunned" due to the transition from a .45ACP SIG to a 9mm FN. ;)
     
  24. khadga

    khadga Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    I noticed the same, Fishbed77. While I was waiting in a LONG gyro line, I tried to ask the chunky moustache and sunglasses CPD stationed by the entrance where the lines get food from inside led if he liked the safety-decocker setup on the FNS, but he acted like he couldn't hear me three feet to his right. Same friendly CPD demeanor I'm used to. Guess he was too busy scouting for insurgents to speak to a citizen.

    Most cops put far more wear on their holsters than their pistols, never firing them on the job except to barely qualify, so I'm sure the FNS will holdup like the reliable Sig 220 even if it isn't.

    I like the FNP-9 quite a bit, and while not a fan of the operating controls on the FNS or FNX, I'm not surprised that a department that didn't like the Glock favored a manual safety. The safety thumbs down for live, 1911 proper, but even if you (or some bureaucrat) want a thumb safety, I think integrating the decock function into the same lever is a poor idea for a combat pistol. Under pressure, the poorly trained will decock their weapon unintentionally. Even the well trained will have to re-learn their grip if they have 1911 experience, because as you ride the safety with your thumb after the draw & sweep, you'll naturally push the lever into decock.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice