Compact Distance?

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by tws3b2, Aug 10, 2022.

  1. Good Ol' Boy

    Good Ol' Boy Member

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    I'm way late on this one but aside from Bill Drills, Mozambique's and the like, getting into some competition shooting where movement and cover/concealment is part of the game would be most beneficial.

    If you're lucky enough to have local Force on Force training, go do that.

    If none of that is an option practice dry firing the first two examples, from concealment. Throw some mag changes in for good measure.
     
    Tinman357 likes this.
  2. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    I would say What I want to say to this. But, If I did I would be kicked off this forum. So, I won't say anything but this. Well,, I can't say that either .
     
  3. trackskippy

    trackskippy Member

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    What? Not even a hint? :p

    What part of reality scares or annoys you the most?
     
  4. Shawn Dodson

    Shawn Dodson Member

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    Get yourself a copy of Tom Givens' book, Concealed Carry Class.

    In Chapter 12, Training Priorities, Givens presents data he's collected regarding the circumstance of defensive gun use (DGU) by private citizens. AFAIK, Givens' data is the only data of this kind, with which to guide your training to make it reality-based.

    According to Givens, the majority of DGUs by private citizens occur between 3-7 yards, with the overwhelming majority occurring between 3-5 yards.

    Givens also uses the FBI qualification course as well as his more challenging Rangemaster qualification course in his training classes.

    Givens uses an 8-inch "vital area" standard, as does Jeff Gonzales (Trident Concepts). I train to keep my shots within a 4-inch circle at all distances out to 15 yards, based on the expectation that my performance will suffer under extreme stress. I do most of my training at 7-yards. I occasionally train at 25-yards, but not too often. The max distance in which I routinely train is 15-yards, because it represents three car lengths, and represents the situation in which I were on the side of the road with car trouble and a bad guy(s) pulled up to victimize me while I’m vulnerable.
     
  5. citizenconn

    citizenconn Member

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    "Hell is other people because you are, in some sense, forever trapped within them, subject to their apprehension of you."
    - Mike Rugnetta expounding on Sartre's quote: "Hell is other people."
     
  6. scaatylobo

    scaatylobo Member

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    Realistically you "might" some bad day have to take the shot of your life.

    UNLESS you carry large amounts of cash,or are in BAD neighborhoods often,or any other of a million situations that are not the daily routine of most Americans.

    Other than the exceptions = you might need to draw [ BUT NOT TO A DRAWN GUN ] and take the shot or 2 of a lifetime.

    That shot will MOST LIKELY BE no more than 3 feet ----- and likely less than 21 feet [ THE 7 yard measure we all know ].

    If you can draw from a cold holster and hit a 6 inch pie plate,then your in the minority and yes ----- your GTG.

    You cannot miss fast enough ------------------- so DO NOT MISS.

    That is not a "target" view it as a THREAT.
     
  7. luzyfuerza

    luzyfuerza Member

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    The OP is at the point where shooting some well-thought-out skills development drills plus some tests of handgun competency are probably in order.

    Here are some of my favorites:

    https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/range-drills-training-skill-check-fun.899935/#post-12181215

    And a simple combination drill/test that focuses on handgun fundamentals:

    https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/bill-wilsons-half-prez-drill.909999/#post-12399088

    Almost all of these include performance standards of some kind. Select two or three and try them out. Keep records of your results. Practice these skills. Retest, and look for improvement.

    Then try different drills.

    If you work at it, pretty soon you'll be a more well-rounded handgun shooter, much better than you are now, AND you'll know your own personal limits.

    One other note: your progress will be much faster if you find a competent trainer to help.
     
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