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Compensator on a carry gun??

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Mastiff, Feb 29, 2008.

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  1. Mastiff

    Mastiff Member

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    I was wondering about what you guys think about a compensator/muzzle brake on a carry gun. I'm setting up a pistol in 9x23 Winchester, and I was told a muzzle brake is a good idea with this cartridge.
     
  2. MaterDei

    MaterDei Member

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    I disagree. Compensators will blind you at night and possibly severly burn you in a CQB situation. YMMV
     
  3. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    Compensators and muzzle brakes are not the same thing. A compensator uses ports in the top of the barrel to reduce muzzle flip or climb under recoil. A muzzle brake has ports in the sides to redirect the muzzle blast so as to push the gun forward so it does not rear back as hard. You will only find these on very high-powered rifles; they are a necessity on a .50 BMG as the full force of the rearward thrust, unbraked, could injure you. A pistol has no need of this, but a compensator can be of benefit in some types of games, er, I mean competition.

    I don't think many people, including myself, are going to favor a compensator on a self-defense handgun, though. The (probably) already substantial muzzle flash of this round will be directed upward, directly into your line of sight, instead of forward. If fired at night it could momentarily blind you, somewhat like a camera flash. If you have to shoot from a position close to your body (e.g., from the hip or held close to your face), the escaping gases and particles could injure you.
     
  4. Mastiff

    Mastiff Member

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    Thanks for educating me on the difference between muzzle brakes and compensators. From your comments, it seems like a bad idea in a carry gun. I might get faster shots off, but in the real world the negatives outweigh the benefits.
    I appreciate the information.
     
  5. 76shuvlinoff

    76shuvlinoff Member

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    I have a ported SA Ultracompact 3.5" 45. (the V10) I hate the porting and mostly it just hangs in the locker. I enjoy shooting my XD40 or my full size Kimber so much more.
    If it ever came down to a wrestling match with someone over that ported 45 I think it could be dangerous (to the shooter) to fire it.... just an opinion.
     
  6. PointOneSeven

    PointOneSeven Member

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    I carried a .44 mag revolver that was ported a few times. Less of an issue with those as they are already spraying out the sides of the cylinder, a little more gas out the top isn't really more of a safety issue :D.
     
  7. LUPUS

    LUPUS Member

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    Also add the grid that will accumulate in the barrel through the porting holes.

    Regards.
     
  8. Eric F

    Eric F Member

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    Poor choice venting gasses can cause eye damage if they catch you in the face. I use to think a comp gun would be cool until I tried a eaa in 45 with a comp. I did a point shoot from the hip.The gasses tore a hole in my shirt and I cought a face full of grit and stuff. Very unfun.
     
  9. Pat-inCO

    Pat-inCO Member

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    Good idea, as long as you be sure to carry the tripod and extra ammo cans[sic].
     
  10. Mastiff

    Mastiff Member

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    Thanks again, especially for not making too many jokes at what turned out to be a really stupid question. It is appreciated.
     
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