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Competition seater- worth the money?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Fatelvis, Feb 1, 2003.

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  1. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    I just splurged and bought Redding`s Comp. seater for my Rem 700 VLS. Has anyone noticed a measurable difference in group shrinkage, after using this die? Im trying to load as accurate as I can for this rifle, and was wondering how it performed in the "real world"! Thanx-
     
  2. Fatelvis,
    The Redding is one of the best Comp Seater dies on the market and does work. all that being said, just remember no Comp or in-line seater die will help you load ammunition that straight if yor sizing die is not sizing your cases square. the expander ball in the sizer die being pulled through the case neck along with un-even case neck thickness contributes greatly to case neck run-out. i found that even just neck sizing the cases will not eliminate case neck run-out. using a carbide expander ball helps reduce this, as does completely removing the expander ball. make sure you square your sizing die to your press and use a shellholder that isn't too sloppy. i use a Redding F/L sizer with the expander ball removed along with their Competition shell holders which helps me control Headspace and gives me the tightess round to chamber fit. i use a Sinclair expander die and their neck turning mandrels which are .002" less than the bullet dia. to control bullet neck tension. using this technique i have been able to keep case neck run-out down to .001" or less.HTH
    Rick:D :what: :D
     
  3. Bullet

    Bullet Member

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    I would recommend looking at Sinclair International's Web page. They have a lot of information about precision loading. As far as being able to tell a difference in group size just by using a Redding seater I don't think you will be able to tell a difference unless your old seater was way off or for some of the reasons listed by Rick from **********. I was told that if you wanted the best accuracy you do a lot of small things, that by themselves might not show on target but when added together should make an improvement on target. Accuracy is not just your loads. Accuracy can be limited by your rifle. Some of the items that Sinclair sells are probably better for bench guns. I've owned Rem 700's that shot very good groups at 100 yards - lots of 3/4 inch groups some even better.
     
  4. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    Thanks Rick and Bullet. The seater is part of a set, with Reddings` bushing neck sizer,(with no expander) and body die. Rick, I also bought the comp. shellholders for the reasons you described. I trim and chamfer/deburr cases regularly, but neck turning is a little much for me. I hope all this pays off with small groups! I guess only time and experimentation will tell. I`lll report back with range results at a later date, comparing the two methods of loading. Good shootin!
     
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Moderator Emeritus

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    Yes, the comp size and seat dies are worth it, at least at long distance (say 600 yards). Neck turning is highly debated for military rifles, since the chambers are alreay pretty loose. Yes, I know that a thick neck on one side would theoretically affect concentricity, but you can tell that to someone who didn't shoot the spotter 5 times in a row yesterday at 600 yards from prone position. All I did was load em up on my Dillon!

    Redding bushing sizer die and Forster Ultra seater die.

    FWIW, the Redding seater has been known to spread and cause concentricity issues if used for compressed loads. Hence the Forster.
     
  6. bogie

    bogie Member

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    I suggest that you try different neck tensions (using different bushings - the folks at Sinclair can help you there), and different seating depths.
     
  7. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Moderator Emeritus

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    Agreed. Unfortunately you can pass the cost of the die by a long shot by trying different bushings, but in the end its worth it.
     
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