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Concealed Carry in Scrubs

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Bobson, Nov 10, 2014.

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  1. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    I ran a search for this but didn't uncover anything resembling a thorough discussion on the matter.

    I'm going into a career in the medical field, and while options exist, my primary interest is in working in a hospital. I will be wearing scrubs at work 100% of the time, and I'm curious if anyone has advice about concealed carry in scrubs.

    I feel like this warrants it's own thread because the scrubs themselves introduce at least two unique challenges to concealment. Namely, (1) scrubs don't have belt loops, which seems to eliminate traditional hip carry; and (2) scrubs are very light, flappy fabric, which means avoiding printing may be an extreme challenge.

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
     
  2. TennJed

    TennJed Member

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    interesting topic. I am glad I do not wear scrubs
     
  3. BP Hunter

    BP Hunter Member

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    The best way in my opinion, to carry when wearing scrubs would be an ankle holster. Even the lightest pocket gun would be heavy in an IWB or OWB holster with a draw string as your belt.
     
  4. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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  5. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    Fanny pack under the scrubs shirt?

    Neck chain gun holster?

    I don't wear scrubs either.
     
  6. hamp sandwich

    hamp sandwich Member

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    The smart carry option is good. Ankle holsters are "ok" for a backup, but they put your gun in an awkward place. I recommend something that you can reach without contouring, crouching, twisting, etc.
     
  7. dogtown tom

    dogtown tom Member

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    <----Adapted PE teacher who wears elastic waist/drawstring warm-up pants & sports shorts nearly every day.

    I cannot legally carry while in school, but have contemplated how I would do so if the State of Texas made it legal.

    I've tried several methods while bike riding or walking the dog.
    After numerous trials I've found that a BellyBand will hold a small pistol securely. It is a horribly slow draw.


    I have not tried the undershirts with holster pockets mainly because they are darn expensive.
     
  8. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    The neck holster could also be a possibility, depending on what youre wearing under the scrubs. I made this one for my Seecamp, and have one for my LCP. They work well, but the chain can get old over time, especially if its against your skin alone.

    ?tn=795059127.jpg
     
  9. JN01

    JN01 Member

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    A neck holster will print a lot if you bend forward. Another vote for Smartcarry.
     
  10. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    Most health care faclilities prohibit workplace carry.
     
  11. Daveboone

    Daveboone Member

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    A neck holster is not a good idea. As an orthopedic/ trauma nurse, almost daily I am grappled around the neck/shoulders by a client that is unsteady, confused or afraid anything around the neck is prone to getting ripped off.
    although I am not one to try to influence anothers choice on when they want to carry or decide their safety, a hospital presents ( along with almost a guaranteed ban on any weapons) many challenges and potential compromises in concealed carry, not the least of which is what to do with it if you are exposed to certain diagnostic machines such as an MRI which can cause a disastrous magnetic field with any metal nearby.
    My compromise if working late or night shift, was to secure my carry piece (still totally against policy) in my padlocked locker.
     
  12. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    There are two good options:

    1. A pocket holster with a very light pistol such as a Kel Tec P3AT.

    2. Thunder Wear
     
  13. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I would vote for the Smart Carry except for where it will be worn. In the medical field especially when in a hospital much of the time you are caring for patients in bed. those beds have guards on the side and when you lean against them you might "clang" when the gun hits the bed. Add the annoyance of the gun hitting everything you lean against all day it might not be a good choice.

    That leaves ankle carry. IMO for this application ankle carry is probably a good choice.
     
  14. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    I disagree; in that setting an ankle holster isn't deep enough concealment. As long as you have a small light pistol in a pocket holster or Thunder Wear, there will be no clanging on anything.
     
  15. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Not deep enough concealment? How so???
     
  16. WC145

    WC145 Member

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    I'm a respiratory therapist in hospital and wear scrubs daily. I've carried a S&W J frame in a Renegade ankle holster for years. Never had an issue with concealment, it's comfortable, and access is reasonably fast with practice. I've tried other guns and methods of carry and this has worked out best.

    If you've ever worn scrubs you know that there are no secrets in those pants. Thunderwear and Smart Carry sound like good ideas but it's obvious you're packing something in there. Fanny packs work but no one wears them anymore.
     
  17. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    It's good to have first hand information. Speculation is nice but actual experience is even better.
     
  18. guyfromohio

    guyfromohio Member

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    Belly band or smart carry....but as said, most healthcare companies will prohibit employee carry.
     
  19. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    You can carry in a hospital as an employee?
    What state is that in?
    Never saw one yet that allowed employees to carry and if caught, you were fired yesterday, if not arrested.
    Make sure you can before you do
     
  20. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    Ive carried in non permissive environments, daily, most of my life. Sure, you run the risk of losing your job, but thats better than losing your life, simply because the company manual is looking out strictly for the company.

    Seems to me, if they tell you you cant carry to protect yourself, then they bear all the responsibility of your safety and security. Of course, they dont see it that way.
     
  21. bangswitch

    bangswitch Member

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    And, as bikerdoc said, most healthcare institutions have strict no firearms policies.
    Our facility prohibits any type firearm anywhere on the campus, and that includes the trunk of an employee's vehicle. While I don't agree with the blanket ban, I can agree in principle on no carry while in the facility. There is really no practical way to carry while wearing scrubs; whatever method you use will not provide complete concealment, it will either intermittently show, or print so that it's obvious. We have a company police, sworn LEO's, in our facility, who are armed; we are also a contract facility for the state's DOC, and there isn't a day goes by that we don't have a dozen Correctional Officers at various places with their inmate charges. All of them are armed, as per the DOC's policy.

    I've been an RN for 32 years, and no facility I've ever worked in (about half a dozen civilian and almost that many military facilities), and none of them have ever permitted employees to carry. I have carried as a working Nurse, but it was in a combat zone, which I think everyone would agree is a different situation.

    I can think of almost NO scenario where you would need to have a weapon, much less a firearm, while at work in a hospital. Inside is a fairly well controlled environment, and there are systems in place to deal with both violent patients, as well as visitors. It would be too easy to have a firearm taken from you, and too difficult to safely use one. You would almost NEVER have a clear background. Our company police carry Tasers in addition to G19's. Entry to the facility is well controlled, and certain areas, like our O.R. and psych unit, are card or fingerprint access only.

    Wearing scrubs to work, in some facilities, is also a no-no, due to sterility and contamination issues. You change after you get there, and change before you leave. So, if you're thinking of how to carry while wearing scrubs to and from work, I suppose there are ways, but like I said before, it's hard to hide anything under a set of them. Just ask any of the women when it's cold in the room. :eek::rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  22. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Incorrect, as no one is forcing you to work there. Most hospitals, especially those in bigger cities, generally have security and or police on duty.

    You signed an agreement and were most likely handed an employee handbook with the rules and regs inside. If you signed and violated this agreement, well, this can get tied into a few other threads here about carrying where not allowed. Amazing how some folks pick and choose what rules they want to violate or laws to break.
     
  23. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    Several points:

    1. There is no state law that prohibits carrying weapons in a health care facility in Ohio or Pennsylvania. In Ohio, if any business posts a no carry sign, then you can't legally carry there; if caught it's a misdemeanor and you can't be charged with criminal trespassing at last on the first offense.

    2. There was a doctor not that long ago that shot and killed an attacker in a health care facility that prohibited firearms.

    3. Certain areas of the hospital ARE high risk areas for confrontations such as the ER. Some hospitals have police officers with guns, arrest powers, etc. Others have lame geriatric security officers. If you happen to get hurt at work, it's a workmans comp. issue and I doubt the hospital would be responsible for anything more than that. Unless it's something that directly affect the administrators, they don't usually care.

    4. Most health care facilities prohibit employees from carrying weapons.

    5. As far as carrying handguns with scrubs goes, an ankle holster would not be my choice but they apparently work for some. Thunder Wear does not print nor does it make you look like you have an erection. Like I mentioned before, a small light handgun in a good pocket holster does not print nor does it bang and clank on railings. A belly band is quite concealable but gets a bit hot.
     
  24. tactikel

    tactikel Member

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    Wear scrubs daily, IF your employer allows CCW a neck holster is your best option, second is an ankle holster. My employer prohibits firearms anywhere on the property, I carry a pocket knife in street clothes, and when possible a neck knife when in scrubs. Many sterile areas prohibit anything from the outside from being introduced- edged weapons stay in my locker until end of shift. :fire:
     
  25. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    True, but you sometimes have to take what you can get, if you want to make a living, and these days, pretty much everywhere restricts you carrying a gun, or knife, or sharp stick, so what are you to do, if you have to work where you get no help or support, other than your smile and good looks?

    This is more about company liability than it is about the safety of the employee. You have to weigh out what youre comfortable with. I prefer to decide what my life is worth, and who protects it, instead of some corporate lawyer, who doesnt have my best interests at heart. If that requires violating someones rules or laws, so be it.
     
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