Confused on Last steps to barrel cleaning

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by mpia, Oct 18, 2013.

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  1. mpia

    mpia Member

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    I got a new first time ever bolt action 30-06. I've been reading and viewing rifle barrel cleaning comments, PDF's and videos for a couple of months and now gone through the threads here; I'm confused;

    So after brushing with Hoppes#9, using 4 or 5 Hoppes#9 wet patches then 1/2 dozen dry patches, Am I supposed to run an oiled patch as the last step:what:, then a dry one before I take it out to the range:what:?

    I usually fire 20 or 30 rounds rounds between cleanings, but I never used any oil. Oh yeah my groups stink, Controlling my flinching is a work in progress:banghead:. Have I hurt the barrel by not oiling it:what:? am I cleaning it wrong or too much:what:? Help ad some consensus please:uhoh:.
     
  2. 50 Shooter

    50 Shooter member

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    Do you have a bore guide? It will help protect the throat of your barrel as will a crown protector if you run a brush or jag from the muzzle to the chamber.

    Secondly, hoppes doesn't do much for copper deposits, you'll need a solvent that removes copper. You can use an ammonia based one but the smell can knock you out. Wipe Out foam or Boretech's Eliminator don't use ammonia but work as well or better. They're surfectants and if you follow the directions they'll get everything out of your barrel.

    You want to push the solvent out with a jag that fits your barrel, once clean then run a patch with a light coat of oil down the barrel. You don't need to soak it, just use a little and you'll be fine. Then at the range run a clean patch on the JAG through the barrel to get the oil out.

    Have fun shooting, when your accuracy drops off clean it again or if you feel the need, clean it after coming home from the range. Leaving a light coat of oil in the barrel is a good thing, just remember to run a clean patch through it before shooting.
     
  3. frankenstein406

    frankenstein406 Member

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    During hunting I never oil the barrel unless it rains, I also leave the bore dirty for hunting season. I could be wrong but I believe swat leaves there bores dirty all the time and sights in for the cold bore shot. The only rifle I can't leave dirty is my muzzle loader. I clean when the seasons done usually unless its a rimfire then once a year.

    I never run a dry patch after a oiled one.

    Seems like everyone has a different opinion on cleaning. I'm more worried about wiping down the outside of my gun then the bore unless its a muzzle loader.

    I think your cleaning to much. If there's no rust I don't think you've hurt it with no oil.
     
  4. adelbridge

    adelbridge Member

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    I buy hundreds of used guns per year and most normal folks don't clean very well and seldom oil their bores. I have taken in 50 year old guns that have never been cleaned and I have them looking like new in 15 minutes. Too much oil in the bore acts like an obstruction. Wiping visible oil off still leaves a thin film.
     
  5. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    While the article is focused on rimfires I believe the information is worthwhile for any firearm. http://www.rrdvegas.com/rimfire-cleaning.html

    Controlling flinch can be difficult for many but there are several means that provide improvement to many. First, consider a better recoil pad. A Limbsaver can really tame an otherwise nasty kick. Change ammo. Reduced recoil ammo is available which of course reduces the amount of kick needing tamed. Cover your ears. Plugs and ear muffs used together equal less noise which is perceived as less power therefore less recoil. There are also protective shoulder pads, rifle rests and replacement stocks depending on your budget.
     
  6. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    ^ Plus lots of dry firing!

    Try KG carbon solvent, KG Big Bore (ammonia free copper solvent that works) and your choice of oil.

    Possum Hollow makes a good bore guide that's rifle specific. Tipton makes a decent universal model. Either way, get a bore guide and use it.

    A Parker Hale jag, as screwy as they are, cuts cleaning time by a good bit.

    Unless your rifle sits for long periods between shooting, consider not cleaning it as much. If you have to clean the bore after each range trip, run a couple patches of carbon cleaner or a light oil like Kroil through it. If you use carbon cleaner, run an oiled patch, then a dry patch before putting it up.

    Dry fire! and not just sitting on the couch snatching the trigger. Do it like you were actually shooting, just w/o the ammo.
     
  7. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    20-30 rounds between cleanings? So you've got a cleaning hobby and do a little shooting on the side? :)

    Most guns shooting modern, non-corrosive ammo just don't need much cleaning. It is important to keep the outer surfaces that you've handled wiped down, and I'd clean and leave a light film of oil on any gun I was going to put away in storage for a while -- just because I don't want it sitting there many months or years through possibly changing humidity without any eyes on it to see what might be happening.

    Flinch can be cured by a lot of careful, deliberate, dryfiring and with rimfire shooting (if done with best practices in mind -- not just blasting). It can also be cured (in bench shooting at least) by going back to fundamentals of focusing on the crosshair superimposed on the target at you press the trigger slowly to achieve a surprise break.
     
  8. mpia

    mpia Member

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    Many Thanks Everyone


    I really appreciate the candor on flinching, I got a good 1" recoil pad that fits into the nice 4 inch long scar a surgeon left in my shoulder years ago; Makes sense to get a shoulder pad and practice real dry firing, will do!

    I did get a Mike Lucas bore guide last month; I was using a Gunslick but the little aluminum stop-handle threads stripped out. Today I bought some Shooters copper solvent and Wow, what a beautiful Dark Teal blue color came out on my first three patches, scrubbed 10 strokes with phosphor brush, waited 5 min, then two more patches of solvent then followed with dry patches till "no show on color";
    Finished off with a couple three drops of Hoppes lube oil on a patch.

    Its cleaned now so I guess I'll shoot for a bit see how it settles down to grouping and pay attention to how it varies. But I do think about every 70 or 80 rounds I will clean it out with the Hoppes and Copper solvent, again tracking how the rifle groups.

    Thanks for all the good reflections on this, and I appreciate the detail and thought you folks provided:D.
    Mike P.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
  9. mastiffhound

    mastiffhound Member

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    I switched from regular Hoppe's #9 to #9 Semi-Auto. The Hoppe's #9 Semi-Auto does say that it removes copper and lead! It has been working great on all my rifles for a few months now. I don't remember the price of the first bottle I got from a LGS but Wally World has it for between $6 to $8 I think.

    After a 525 box of Fed. Bulk my nephew shot in one sitting through my 10/22 it was pretty dirty with lead and copper. It cleaned it out very easily, it had grey goo with copper colored specs coming out during the cleaning. The bore and barrel were much easier to clean (took less time too!) and looked as good as brand new.

    It has worked very well (took less time also) on my AR's after extended shooting sessions. I have to clean all my firearms when we get done shooting. Stuff seems to come out easier when they are still warm. I have OCD so I can't help it. It also helps that I live in the country so my range is my back 5 acres and my shooting bench is my back porch:D
     
  10. WYcoyote

    WYcoyote Member

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    I like to finish up with a couple wet patches of oil (Rem oil), if I am going to store it for a while I'll leave it wet, and then before shooting run a couple dry patches thru.
    If shooting it soon, or taking it hunting, I will run the dry ones thru right away.
    And before hunting, I will fire at least one fouling shot.
     
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