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Conservatives call for return to core Republican principles

Discussion in 'Legal' started by rick_reno, Jan 10, 2006.

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  1. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    The fall election might have these folks worried - I hope so, they've earned it.
    I think at this stage of the game whatever they do (and I don't expect much) will be too little too late. They've had YEARS to straighten this mess out and have done nothing.

    http://news.ft.com/cms/s/cf26b6b2-820b-11da-aea0-0000779e2340.html

    With Republicans embroiled in an influence-peddling scandal that could threaten their control of Congress, the biggest pressure for reform is coming from lawmakers who charge that the party’s woes have come from abandoning its core conservative principles.

    Jeff Flake, an Arizona Republican congressman who co-led the petition drive that helped oust Tom DeLay, the House majority leader, said in an interview yesterday: “We don’t just need a new majority leader, we need a course correction.

    “A lobbyist can’t be corrupt unless he has somebody to bribe, and we’ve created a culture that just breeds corruption,” he charged.

    While the Republicans captured the House of Representatives in 1994 following a popular backlash against perceived corruption in the Democratic party, the party’s conservative critics say it has now fallen prey to the same Washington culture. A group of more than 100 members organised as the Republican Study Committee is hoping to use the leadership race to rein in what they see as runaway government spending championed by Mr DeLay and his allies.

    At the top of the conservative reform agenda is an end to the practice of earmarking, in which members can secretly insert into huge spending bills billions of dollars in projects for favoured companies or other constituents – many of whom in turn donate to the lawmakers’ re-election funds. While the practice is not new, it has mushroomed since Republicans captured Congress. Last year 15,000 earmarks were added into various spending bills.

    Legislators are facing growing pressure over the practice. Jerry Lewis, the Republican who chairs the House appropriations committee, is under fire after the San Diego Union-Tribune reported he had earmarked hundreds of millions of dollars to clients of a former colleague and lobbyist, Bill Lowery.

    Mr Flake predicted the fallout over earmarking “would be ugly, and if we haven’t addressed it prospectively, we’re in deeper trouble than we know”.

    The conservatives are also hoping to reform the congressional budgeting process by sharply reducing the use of “emergency” spending bills, such as those that have paid for the war in Iraq and rebuilding following Hurricane Katrina. They would also reform House rules to allow more challenges to spending bills that exceed agreed budget targets, and to ensure that such bills can be carefully reviewed by lawmakers before votes are held.

    Mr Flake and other conservatives have yet to find a leadership candidate who stands clearly for their cause, however. Mike Pence, who chairs the Republican Study Committee, has said he will not seek the leadership. Conservatives are hoping to draft John Shadegg, another Arizona Republican.

    Neither of the frontrunners, John Boehner of Ohio or the acting majority leader, Roy Blunt, appears an obvious champion for the conservatives. In a letter this week announcing his candidacy, Mr Boehner did not sketch out an aggressive reform plan, saying instead: “I think we need to engage in a bit of renewal.”

    Mr Blunt, an ally of Mr DeLay, is part of the Republican leadership. But Mr Flake said that on the issue of earmarking “there’s a stark difference between the two. John Boehner has never put an earmark in an appropriation bill.” Mr Blunt, in contrast, “is an unapologetic champion of earmarks”, he said.
     
  2. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    Return to core Republican principles? When did they ever leave?
     
  3. dirtbos

    dirtbos Member

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    Searching in vein?

    They will have to search long and hard to find a true Conservative that has the strength to do what needs to be done. Those that have the necessary seniority have been a Congressman much too long. They are out of touch. Most are arrogant as hell. Their own future is all they seem to care about. Washington is a run away train. It won't get fixed until the train is involved in a head on with an immovable object. I hope to live ling enough to see that day.
     
  4. dasmi

    dasmi Member

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    Please tell me you're joking.
     
  5. McCall911

    McCall911 Member

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    I think the reverse should be true: Republicans should return to core Conservative principles. After all, isn't it Conservative principles that get Republicans elected in the first place? (Principles which Liberals/Leftists pretend to have when they are running, but abandon/compromise after winning.)
     
  6. RealGun

    RealGun Member

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    Perhaps the real issue is what it takes to get elected and then reelected. That would be campaign funds. Special interests would not be that many votes, only cash for deals. If we merely ask for integrity, that won't solve the problem. You would still have "the best government that money can buy".
     
  7. AirForceShooter

    AirForceShooter Member

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    it's beginning to look like they finally got the power and blew it.
    They just might lose both houses in '06.

    AFS
     
  8. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    Not at all. Why would I be joking?
     
  9. tellner

    tellner member

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    It comes and goes. The liberal consensus broke down during the Nixon Administration. The neo-con one is crumbling now.

    Honesty, competence, justice, and hard work in the difficult job of governance are not conservative or liberal principles. They transcend Party and should be encouraged wherever they are found.
     
  10. Biker

    Biker Member

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    Now I *know* you're joking.
    Biker
     
  11. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    I'm really not.
     
  12. xd9fan

    xd9fan Member

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    for the party to go back to Conservative values.......I'll wait and hold my breath.:scrutiny:
     
  13. Biker

    Biker Member

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    We're deeper in debt than we've ever been under this Admin's watch, we have the Patriot Act and the Fisa fiasco, more government than ever before, and Jorge Bush practically begging for more illegals to cross the border. Just a few of a butt-load of non-conservative proclivities perpetuated upon the U.S. in the last 5 years and you claim that we're returning conservative principles?
    Biker
     
  14. dasmi

    dasmi Member

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    Forgetting all of the NSA Spying, and Patriot act crap, when has Republican principle included the largest debt our country has ever been in?
     
  15. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

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    OK, Feeb, let's take just one. Fiscal conservatism.

    While I would OBVIOUSLY agree that the Dems would be far more profligate spenders if they had their way, one cannot seriously argue that the current republican leadership is toeing the line on fiscal responsibility. They have solid control of both houses of congress and have had the presidency for 6 years now. Why is it that we're still growing government and spending more than we take in? It's not like the Dems could force the issue if the Republicans grew a spine and stood their ground.

    I'll defend Bush on many things, but his handling of fiscal matters has been very poor.

    Mike
     
  16. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    When has fiscal conservatism ever been a core Republican value? Oh sure, they talk it up every four years or so like all their other core values, but once they're in charge they get back to their real core values: state worship and increasing government power.
     
  17. Ziryo

    Ziryo Member

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    Words are cheap.

    I'm waiting to see action, not (possibly) more empty words.
     
  18. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

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    It is a core republican value, in the sense that most of the people who vote for them rate it a high priority. Once elected, it's politics as usual, on both sides of the aisle.

    Mike
     
  19. rock jock

    rock jock Member

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    I am a hardcore Republican, but Bush has been such a disappointment on so many issues. Where do I begin?

    - the largest increase in entitlement programs in the nation's history (Medicare bill)
    - Medicare prescription drugs
    - the federal deficit
    - the border situation
    - pandering to the liberal minority vote by vowing to rebuild New Orleans from the ground up (a city that deserves to burn in place)
    - Harriet Meiers

    And most Republicans are in lock-step with him. I'm disgusted.
     
  20. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    The people who vote for them claim it's a high priority, but they're as dishonest as the people they constantly vote for.

    Republican voters do not want a smaller government. They may be as good at talking the talk as the politicians they elect, but start discussing the specifics of an issue with them and it always ends with more government.
     
  21. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    This hits the nail on the head - I believe if you study Republican administrations, you won't find one instance in the past 75 years when government got smaller with them at the helm. They're basically the same as the Democrats, the only differences are what we choose to believe.
     
  22. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    Ever read Pat Buchanan?
     
  23. Kodiaz

    Kodiaz member

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    To be honest I'm not even sure about voting this time out I live in south Fl In a very liberal area and really and our supposedly conservative senators and representatives just don't seem all that conservative to me. The guys in So. Fl would wipe their hind end with the 2nd amendment. North Fl keeps South Fl free. Heck if it wasn't for No. Fl I'd have less freedom than the people in **********.

    Thank you to all the North Floridians that keep me free.

    Well I guess I better go and vote if only to help my brothers in north Fl.
     
  24. rock jock

    rock jock Member

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    Small govt. does not mean no govt. It also means small govt. at the federal level with more authority transferred to the state level, i.e., govt. that meets the restrictions imposed by the Constitution.

    You're confusing the Libertarian Party with the GOP.
     
  25. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    So we're back to talking the talk. Pat Buchanan's rhetoric is no different than most other conservatives. There's just more of it.

    Besides, conservative voters didn't elect Pat Buchanan. They picked Bush, Dole, and Bush 2 over him. When push came to shove, even Pat Buchanan supported one of the Bushes and Dole over himself.


    I'm certainly not confusing the libertarians with anything.

    Republican voters don't want a small federal government and they certainly aren't concerned with state governments meeting any restrictions imposed by the Constitution. Pick an issue and the Republican solution probably involves more government. They'll just have some convoluted explanation as to how massively increasing the size of government is actually making it smaller.
     
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