Controversial opinion: RemOil is actually pretty good

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by daniel craig, Nov 26, 2021.

  1. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    I pulled a target with a Dupont Tribologist at Camp Perry. He claimed WD40 had a light evaporative oil, that left a silicone layer. Which explains why WD40 turns gummy.

    I never had any particular problem with Rem Oil, but then, I primarily use motor oils for lubrication. I also tend to over lubricate. :oops:
     
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  2. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    I field strip my EDC once a week to get rid of any lint, wipe it down, run a bore snake thru it and re-oil it with either Rem Oil or Hoppes Oil.
     
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  3. Reloadron
    • Contributing Member

    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    During the early and mid 1990s my wife and I owned a small brick and mortar gun shop. One rave I recall was Tetra-Gun gun care and maintenance products. We sold it along with Hoppes and several other products.Every company making gun care products had a product better than the next. Whatever the gun rag magazines advertised was the very best ever made. This discounting the fact that every gun care products manufacturer was paying the gun rags money to run their advertising and gun writers to publish wonderful stories about their products.

    Figure it this way. When Browning designed his 1911 pistol none of the new and improved lubricants even existed. There were no synthetic oils with magic ingredients. There were machine oils and a gun was a machine. Yes, it really was that simple. When I grew up a can of simple 3 in 1 oil worked just fine and guns survived just fine.

    Today I use Rem Oil and really like their wipes, I also use Tetra Gun because I have some left over from the shop and I use Hoppes as well as others. Use whatever works for you as to gun care products. The best gun care products are the ones which serve you and your gun the best. There is no magic gun care oil anymore than there is a magic bullet.

    Ron
     
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  4. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    https://www.amsoil.com/

    I have been very happy with AmsOil

    Find a local dealer and it may be cheaper.
    I get it for less than $10

    As stated above, my Granddad shot a Browning A5 Sweet 16. He bought it new. He was a serious quail hunter, he would shoot 60+ boxes of shells per year. We are quail, year round.
    I never seen him use anything but 3-in-1.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2021
  5. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    Spot on!
     
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  6. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    My 1978 H&R 650 revolver And 1974 Remington 700. Both bought new by me and Both have seen many applications of WD40. When they start to gummy up I'll let you know. But, They gonna have to hurry. I getting to dang old to wait much longer.
    20210418_175913.jpg 20200204_113158~4.jpg
     
  7. BigBL87

    BigBL87 Member

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    I like RemOil for certain purposes, but I use separate cleaners and lubricants for those purposes. I primarily use RemOil as a protective coating when I'm done cleaning and putting a gun back in the safe. I also put a clean patch with it down the bore to give it a light protective coat as well.

    While CLP products (which RemOil is) have their place for sure, I tend to figure they do all 3 things decently but not each one individually as well as a devoted chemical for that purpose.

    For cleaning I use MPro7 and for lubrication I use Lucas Gun Oil. I like the thicker viscosity of the Lucas for keeping it in place as a lubricant.
     
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  8. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    My brother was a big Remoil fan. When I cleaned out his safe after he passed there was no rust on or in any of his guns. There was, however, a slightly tacky coating all over them where the oil had dried. WD40 took it off. I use Remoil wipes throughout trap season to take sweaty fingerprints off the metal parts and run the used wipe through the barrel when done.
    Reading old issues of Precision Shooting I noted that the writers used it for bore cleaning.
     
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  9. Necessary_Nutrient

    Necessary_Nutrient Member

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    I had stopped using remoil for years, still don't plan to make a habit of it especially since I have so much other stuff.

    Still, I did just use it to "Fix" a new Savage 25 Walking Varminter in .223 that seemed to have light firing pin strikes and wouldn't work with some ammo. Some were saying online that it was a gummed up firing pin/action in the bolt itself so I sprayed the bolt out it out with B&C Cleaner then added a few drops of Remoil so that there would be some light lubrication. So far it has worked perfectly
     
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  10. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    To be sure...

    It is quite possible for a petroleum lubricant to "gum up the works", as it were.

    Lubricants DO have a shelf life, and that shelf life is based on their being stored in their original, SEALED containers. This means that the shelf life of unsealed containers may be (significantly) shorter than for sealed containers, and also implies that the properties of the lubricant outside the containers may degrade over an even shorter period of time.

    Degradation takes many forms...moisture absorption, contamination, chemical degradation, and more. They may affect lubricating characteristics, viscosity, corrosion resistance characteristics, moisture boundary characteristics, etc.

    This applies to all types of lubricants, whether petroleum based or not. The difference being in how, exactly, the lubricant's characteristics degrade over time and what the mechanism for that degradation is.

    It is entirely possible to apply a fantastic lubricant to your firearm(s) and, after a period of time in storage, said firearm(s) may not function properly until it's again cleaned and lubricated because the lubricant has "gummed up the works" by changes brought about by long term evaporation of the more volatile components, absorption of moisture, attracting of contaminants, oxidation, etc.

    This does not necessarily mean that the lubricant in question is "bad", only that the lubricant has limitations one must be aware of and take into account when caring for one's firearms. Not understanding this can lead to frustrations in functionality or having to deal with corrosion which could have otherwise been avoided.

    Even "The Best" of lubricants have their limitations...none are endowed with magical properties that will last forever under all conditions of use or storage. This despite what their advertisements would lead us to believe.

    If your lubricant maintains the proper functionality of your firearms and prevents corrosion under your regimen of care and cleaning, then your lubricant is perfectly satisfactory. If it does not...then either you need to change your lubricant, change your care and cleaning regimen, or both.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2021
  11. Poper

    Poper Member

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    I have a friend that owns a company that makes products that are sold in aerosol cans. According to him, he has been having a lot of trouble getting cans the last 12 months or so.
     
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  12. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    I was on ACADEMY, yesterday.
    Their shelf was full of aerosol cans, needle dropper, squeeze bottles and RemOil wipes.
     
  13. Obturation

    Obturation Member

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    Down the rabbit hole we go...


    Unpopular opinion : I don't really lube my guns.

    Reality: blued guns get a wipe down after handling , typically with a remoil wipe if I've got them. High friction areas get a little motor oil and guns I carry get zero. I have a very solid grasp on the use of lubricants , I get it. An AR style rifle likes lube, others don't care. I lube as little as possible, it generates scum and causes problem, that's not an opinion - it's a fact.

    I see these guys with all the funky dog lube and whatever squirting it to magically clean their tacticool gear. I don't care, use what you want. I clean with trans fluid, don't bother making Ed's red or anything and copper wool & q tips. Promise no one on earth could tell that I didn't submerge the entire gun for months in the super cleaner of tomorrow. I don't buy gimmicks, I don't waste my time or money on the next best thing, it's nuts.

    Have I ever worn out a gun because it wasn't dripping goo? No.
    Could you or anyone tell my gun from the next guys? No.
    Do I care what you use? No
    Do you care what I use? Hopefully not.

    I just don't see the point in worrying about wear on a mechanism that's meant to be used if it doesn't shorten its longevity / you won't wear it out in your lifetime. We've had this discussion a few times, almost no one ever said they flat wore a a gun out and if they did I doubt lube would have prevented it. Carry guns are more likely to fail oiled than they are bone dry, less lint and carbon slime to get in the works.

    Some folks are shaking their heads reading this thinking I'm the biggest idiot on the internet. I'm cool with that, let's head to the range and we'll see if my guns fail - spoiler, they don't. My guns are very clean and well maintained and I can put any one of them on my couch without a grease stain.

    I will heavily oil / grease a gun that will be stored for extended periods but that's it. My AR gets a shot of goo before use, my glocks get zero. Revolvers get a drop in the action now and then but it does generate some scum. Certain guns like to run wet, most don't . a thin film is all that will ever be there anyway no matter how much you put on so when my guns are cleaned they get wiped as dry as an oily cloth will get them and no more, works for me. That's what I call "clean", if I say "bone dry" that means degreased and clean with zero oil. Carry guns go bone dry.

    You all have your way , I have mine .

    As far as remoil, I don't care. It's thin and watery and does seem to prevent rust- just like everything else.
     
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  14. Anchorite

    Anchorite Member

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    Very well said.
     
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  15. Poper

    Poper Member

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    Empty aerosol cans?
     
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  16. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not defending overlubricating guns--I've seen that cause problems. But running them dry can also cause problems. I got a call from a guy who ran a rental range. One of his Glock rentals was choking and the slide was hard to rack. I dropped by on the way home from work and took a look at the gun. He had cleaned it using an ultrasonic cleaner, which left the gun "bone dry", and then lubricated it per the Glock lubrication diagram at the time which did NOT include putting a drop of something on the cam/ramp inside the slide of the gun where the connector "ear" rides. The guns come from the factory with a smear of copper anti-seize in that area, but the lubrication diagrams back then didn't show any need to lubricate that spot.

    With the gun dry, there was enough friction between those two items that pulling the slide back was difficult and the gun would not run. I put a drop of oil on the cam/ramp surface and all was well. The newer lubrication diagrams for Glocks now call for a drop of oil in that location, but I generally use a very small dab of light grease instead.

    If the owner of the gun follows Glock's advice to leave the anti-seize in place until it gradually wears away, this is less of an issue as the abrasives in the anti-seize will polish both surfaces over time and leave them smooth enough that it's less likely to have trouble if they are left dry. But if someone "degreases" a Glock that is still relatively new, and doesn't lubricate per the new diagrams, it is possible to make the gun choke.
     
  17. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    You can buy empty cans
    But, your can't buy anything from an empty shelf
     
  18. .45Coltguy

    .45Coltguy Member

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    Google it. Remoil is out there. Amazon has it.
     
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  19. Poper

    Poper Member

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    Well, the fellow I mentioned that sells products in aerosol cans is having a difficult time obtaining new cans to fill with his product so he can then sell his product. He says it appears to be related to the "supply chain" problem. I was wondering if the lack of RemOil in aerosol cans may also be related to my friend's issue in getting new, empty cans. Just a thought.
     
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  20. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Dry is bad, dripping oil is not good, any oil is better than nothing, light oil is better than heavy, oils that stay put linger are better, similarly oils that don’t fling off easily are better.

    I like Lucas and Slip 2000 for gun oil, but tons of folks use mixes of their own or just motor oil. I’m not going to knock anyone’s choice as long as it is a lubricant of some type, although I prefer a dedicated oil, not CLP, and especially not WD-40.
     
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  21. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    20211121_130149.jpg Do I over oil. Nah, Not me
     

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  22. Obturation

    Obturation Member

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    You should store long guns muzzle down, keep the oil from soaking into the stock and congealing in the action.
     
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  23. Bazoo

    Bazoo Member

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    I went to a buddies house once. He had a Remington 7400 muzzle down in the cabinet. Cabinets ain't made for muzzle down. Sure takes up more room that way. It was dry by the way. Guess it was preventative inversion.
     
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  24. Boattale

    Boattale Member

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    If you're leaving enough oil on a gun to run off or congeal in the action, you're leaving way too much on/in the gun. Thin film. Action should be blown out if you use a spray like rem-oil or WD 40.

    Ever been to the fine guns department in Cabela's or Bass Pro? How many of those guns did you see muzzle down?
     
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  25. Obturation

    Obturation Member

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    The guy I was responding to had oil spots on the floor of his safe. Long term storage sometimes causes people to way over oil. If you read my previous post, I'm the minimal lube guy. Over the years oil running down will soak into stocks, even light oil.
    Stores don't keep long guns muzzle down because they tip over easily and it just looks wrong. I'm in no way a gunsmith but I've heard from folks in the know that they store theirs muzzle down- primarily mark Novak has mentioned this a few times if you watch any of his videos.
     
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