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Cordless drill speed when trimming brass

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by ballenbrowning, May 4, 2013.

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  1. ballenbrowning

    ballenbrowning Member

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    I have been using a cordless drill on my rcbs trimmer and was wondering if there was a correct speed to run the drill on. Normally I run it on low but for the last few nights I have trimmed over 1500 pieces of 223 brass and ran the drill on hi to make it a little faster. Everything seemed to work fine but I was wondering if I was missing something.

    Brian
     
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    I use a Lee trimmer with a Makita cordless drill and run it full blast.. I stop when the spirals of cuttings stop.
     
  3. skwolf522

    skwolf522 Member

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    I run my cordless Milwaukee on full blast also on the 1 setting.
     
  4. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    I would run it as fast as it will cut reliably without binding/chattering. You can always experiment and see what works the best for you. I do not think that fast or slow speed will do any damage to the cutter when trimming brass. If trimming nickle casings I would go slower to save the cutter as that will dull it a bit faster.
     
  5. 45lcshooter

    45lcshooter Member

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    There really is no "correct" speed. Just what you feel comfortable with. I use my old Black and Decker Firestorm drill. About a second or so and I have trimmed brass.
     
  6. ballenbrowning

    ballenbrowning Member

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    Thanks for the imput. I figured the high speed was ok.

    Brian
     
  7. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    One thing I'd do is to keep the bearing/s well oiled to prevent wear/premature run out. The Lee I use doesn't have any bearings..
     
  8. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    I use the Lee trimmer, and at high speed also. But, when I get to the ream and chamfering, I operate it at a low speed so I don't accidentally over do it.
    GS
     
  9. hdbiker

    hdbiker Member

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    Milwaukee cordless and a set of Lee's basic length trimming tools for every cal. I reload.I trim and chamfer at mediam to low speed.hdbiker
     
  10. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    If you're doing a LOT of trimming (like case conversion kind of trimming), it's possible to get a steel cutter so hot it wears out, prematurely. Dunno what your system is, but I doubt you could get it that hot just doing normal trimming.
     
  11. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    I ran it full blast.
    It left a smoother surface.

    Then I got lazy & bought a Lyman electric trimmer.
    Haven't looked back since.
     
  12. Mike 27

    Mike 27 Member

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    I use lee and run full blast as well. Running a Dewalt 20V and never an issue.
     
  13. bobinoregon

    bobinoregon Member

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    Full blast with my Hilti cordless and RCBS trimmer and everything works fine.
     
  14. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

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    The faster the speed the more likely you will burn your steel cutter and dull it.

    Even carbide cutters can burn if they are turned too fast. So it depends how often you want to replace cutters and the size of your pocket book.

    The other factor is pressure on the blade. Beginners with cutting tools nearly always use too much pressure. Best to let the tool do the cutting to keep it sharp.
     
  15. bmnloader

    bmnloader Member

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    I've got a RCBS power trimmer that's slow as H$%. does anybody know of a way to increase the speed on it or am I going to have to invent something. It's the slowest point in my reloading.
     
  16. blarby

    blarby Member

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    I do it on low to avoid problems with dislodging the cartridge when firing it up on the first spin- but if you aren't having that problem- knock yourself out !
     
  17. moxie

    moxie Member

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    I changed over to a variable speed corded drill with my Possum Hollow. Better torque and better control overall, giving you a better "feel" for when the trimming is done.
     
  18. Rwskinner

    Rwskinner Member

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    Using .224" as a baseline.

    5,650 RPM with a HSS Cutter
    13,000 RPM with a Carbide Cutter

    Feed rate that you remove material varies with number of cutters, by hand it shouldn't be a concern.


    Richard
     
  19. GP100man

    GP100man Member

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    Med. speed for me on most brass . Most PMC seems to chatter so I use a slower speed on it
     
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