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Cottonmouth Vs Kel Tec

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by cheeze, Aug 14, 2012.

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  1. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    It is.

    The quick way to tell whether the snake in the water is a Cottonmouth or a common water snake is how they swim. If all you see is the head, it's not a Cottonmouth. If you see almost the whole snake...it's a Cottonmouth.
     
  2. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Sure got a set of fangs for a non-venomous snake.
     
  3. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Wrong snake. Go to post #4.
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Oh, sorry. Got lost in the conversation....again.
     
  5. Saddlebag Preacher

    Saddlebag Preacher Member

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    I own a PF9 but an AMES brand shovel was in my hand this day when I met Mr. Timber Rattler.
     

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  6. janobles14

    janobles14 Member

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    isnt the OP's snake a copperhead? sure looks like the ones that i have seen
     
  7. MachIVshooter
    • Contributing Member

    MachIVshooter Contributing Member

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    He was the largest and one of the very few I've ever seen. Here in CO, we just get praire rattlers, usually 2-3' as adults, and rather boring looking compared to the diamondbacks. Plenty venomous, though. We do get a lot of 4-6' bull snakes, but they get a pass. Great rodent hunters, and the worst they'll do to a human is pee all over you.
     
  8. One_Jackal

    One_Jackal member

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    To keep snakes in check on my property I build snake traps put of deer mesh. I cut a piece large enough to wad up like a pile of leaves. Most snakes find the deer mesh irresistible. The snakes get hopelessly tangled in the deer mesh. I use a brush ax to kill the snake and cut it free of the deer mesh.

    Most poisonous snakes in North America have a large triangle shaped head.
     
  9. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    No.

    Copperhead does not have the 'facial band' (dark stripe behind the eye)...and the 'bulk' (body thickness) is another clue. I think you are focusing on the rough similarity of the 'bands' on the body.

    If you look at some pics of copperheads and moccasin's....you will see the difference.

    Very young moccasin's can be mistaken for a copperhead, but as they get older...the differences become readily apparent.
     
  10. Davek1977

    Davek1977 Member

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    A .410 is about perfect medicine for snakes! I've killed them by the dozen with one before. We actually occasionally trap rattlers when we find a den, using a snake trap. A snake trap is basically a wooden box with some mesh windows. The trap is positioned with the hole in the bottom...covered with a flap...directly above the den's hole. When the snakes vacate the den, they push up the flap, go in the box, and the flap falls shut behind them. The trap, which is about 2 ft by 2 ft or so can hold a LOT of rattlesnakes. when all is said and done. I've seen better than 40-50 come out of one den (emptying it multiple times usually), and dad tells of past trappings where they got considerably more
     
  11. dfsixstring

    dfsixstring Member

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    It is illegal to shoot snakes in TN. I'm not sure when that came into being, but I've verified that it is.


    Dfsixstring
    SR9c
    LCP
    RST4S
     
  12. allaroundhunter

    allaroundhunter Member

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    It is illegal to harm snakes native to TN. If you see a non-native snake, such as a Western Diamondback, you are allowed to shoot it.

    Sent from my HTC One X
     
  13. Grmlin

    Grmlin Member

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    Killed a 30 in copperhead two days ago, the wife had litteraly just walked over it. I usualy use a .357 with snake shot but a shovel works just as well. I leave the rat snakes alone but the poisonus ones don't last long if caught around the house. Well except for the big rat snake that was eating the wifes duck she chopped it to peices, to late for the duck the snake had it all the way to the body.
     
  14. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Copperhead has copper colored blotches, hard to mistake and appropriately named. :D

    copperheadnkh.jpg
     
  15. Crazy Carl

    Crazy Carl Member

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    Any reason folks don't eat other types of snakes? I've eaten rattlesnake & loved it; just curious why no mention of others? Seems those thick-bodied cottonmouths would have a decent amount of meat on 'em.
     
  16. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    Within the first 3 months of living here in the "sportsman's paradise" of Louisiana, I went on a white perch fishing trip with a long term friend, (part of the reason I moved here was it is his hometown, at least he assisted the selection process).

    It didn't take me long to find why .22 rifles go fishing in Louisiana. Long story short I shot a cottonmouth and this time had a true shot at a hatband. It's harder than I thought, even with mayonaise jar, formaldehyde, glycerine and alcohol. Bottom line mine puckered and the local moccasins are dull and non-descript in markings.

    I will one day make at least 1 great hatband but am not buring up to "hunt" venomous snakes to do it. Western Diamondbacks would be the pinnacle for a hatband. I have seen beautiful Copperheads, Timbers and Cottonmouth. Not every one is. I have no experience with Mojave's or the more "exotic" North American pit vipers.

    I do know they are still God's creatures and I would need some reason other than, "damn, it's a snake" to kill them. YMMV

    Regards
     
  17. ChefJeff1

    ChefJeff1 Member

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    nice one. I have a zero tolerance policy for rattlesnakes. ALL other snakes are observed and then left alone unless they are on the road then they get chased off so they don't get run over.

    My South American friends ate one of my rattlers once and loved it.
     
  18. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Fried rattler is good, tastes like chicken...with funny bones. :D But, moccasins are NASTY! :barf:
     
  19. Grmlin

    Grmlin Member

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    Shot another copperhead this evening. Gave a pass to a large rat snake in the chicken coup, the most harm it would do is eat a few eggs. The copper was in a high traffic area.
     
  20. smalls

    smalls Member

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    I'm not likely to let a snake live long enough (or get close enough) to figure out whether it's venomous or not. They all scare the hell out of me.
     
  21. lloveless

    lloveless Member

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    dfsixstring wrote: "It is illegal to shoot snakes in TN. I'm not sure when that came into being, but I've verified that it is."

    Where did you verify this? Everyone I know dispatches poisnonous snake on sight with no repercussions.
    ll
     
  22. allaroundhunter

    allaroundhunter Member

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    It is TN law that you cannot kill (or even capture) a native snake. A quick Google search will show you this. Now, chances of you being caught might be slim, but does that make it any less illegal? Just like speeding...

    Here is a quote from the Tennessee hunting regulations:

    Sent from my HTC One X
     
  23. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    Far and away the majority of venomous snakebites reported each year in the US are the work of the Copperhead. If you live within the range in which they are common (like Tennessee) , it will also be common knowledge that you set boundaries and eliminate the few that try to inhabit human high traffic areas, especially traffic by children. Does that mean these are the most common types of encounters? I don't think so. I think it (the high incidence) is the result of their excellent "forest floor" camouflage and their unfortunate defense tactic of first trying to freeze and blend in. That's right, rather than any small hint of agressiveness, the Copperhead plays possum. Or more accurately they use the same freeze and blend in defense that rabbits often adopt. Unfortuantely that means with their astounding camo, they get stepped upon or near enough to trigger a last ditch defensive strike. So I think more often we are in their backyards than they are in ours.

    I have seen numerous photos of Copperheads (especialy in hardwood fall forests) in "plain sight" that you had to play where's waldo to even find when looking for them.

    Luckily the venom is not particularly destructive in the pantheon of pit vipers. A healthy adult in prime age would be expected to survive an "average" bite, perhaps with some disfigurement. Children and the infirm are in more jeapordy. Their range covers a lot of ground where immediate medical intervention is quite difficult, and supply of antivenin is more dicey and inconsistent than most realize.

    In North America, as far as pit vipers go (excluding Corals as they are not pit vipers, but closer to a Cobra in family), the Mojave Rattler has the most potent venom (the green fellow pictured earlier in the thread) and the Western Diamondback is the fellow likely to deliver the most quantity, but based on the likelyhood of being bitten or the frequency of same the Copperhead is the continent's "most dangerous snake".

    I believe Tenessee law may be intended to prevent the Texas style "rattlesnake roundup" type killing, but I am no lawyer so I will stick with, regardless of law, Hillbillies kill them when deemed necessary, and probably practice shut up and dig if worried about enforcement. Even if not a lawyer I am a Hillbilly by extraction at least and think pretty confidently that what I have said is correct.

    P.S. The bit about them smelling like cucumbers is BS as far as my experience goes, if you want to get one and perform smell tests maybe you can substantiate or dispose of this as a myth. As far as I can tell you from numerous sightings over many years, never smelled a cucumber and it is no prevention tactic.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2012
  24. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    I will freely admit that as far as behaviour goes, most agree the most agressive in North America is the Cottonmouth.

    A close second in agressiveness is the Eastern Diamondback.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  25. MachIVshooter
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    MachIVshooter Contributing Member

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    I believe that species is responsible for the most snake bite deaths in the USA.
     
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