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Could be worse, need more shotgun

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by david58, Nov 30, 2019.

  1. david58

    david58 Member

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    High Country New Mexico
    My wife was all over grouse hunting as an excuse to get out to the mountains, and I lucked into a very nice Remington 1100 in 20ga. Perfect fit for her, will be a good grouse gun, as well as dove and quail. And, she won't get tired of shooting it at the range.

    Now she has caught the turkey hunting bug.

    Problem one is that her shotgun has an improved barrel, so unless I can find a full, it's new gun time for her (this is a standard, so the later barrels will not fit, and no Remchoke barrels were made in the 1970's, which is her gun's vintage). I think I know the end result here....another shootgun for mama.

    Problem two is that my shotgun is a Winchester 12ga pump. I am now nearly 62, with a shooting shoulder that has had one surgery and may need another. So a question for you smart guys:
    Should I dive into a new 870 in 20ga, or, should I look at an autoloader in 20ga (in that case, an 1100 since I am stuck on them)? Should I stick to the lowest recoil in the 20 ga setup, meaning auto?

    I'm a-listening...
     
    Cvans and ApacheCoTodd like this.
  2. e rex

    e rex Member

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    As to the choke situation, Carlson will install tubes for around $135.
    For the shoulder, I'd stick with the auto a Beretta 20 auto for the weight reduction. Just my uneducated opinion.
     
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  3. Scribner

    Scribner Member

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    You could do a little “physicL therapy” so you're strong enough to lift the gun. Then you could go here http://www.omahamarian.org/trap/shotshellenergy.html

    and figure the recoil of a gun you are considering. Some 20’s give more felt recoil because they are lighter guns. 1100’s often weigh a little more than other autoloaders, so some recommend them.

    Finally, there are chokes that can be added, like e rex said. For $130, it’s hard to buy a barrel.
     
  4. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    Oh damn.... I'm sure I speak for several of us when I say our hearts bleed for you to have to shop with and for a shotgun to hunt with your wife.;)

    Congratulations on finding her. I know my own wife is one of my three favorite people to shoot with, scout with and fish with.

    I call that lucky for you and I. Do let us know how Turkey hunting turns out.


    Todd.
     
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  5. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    And why won't later barrels fit? I have 1100s from 1970 through 2000, 12 and 20, and, other than "light contour" stuff, they interchange within their gauge. Check ebay, they have dozens. Or, be a hero and buy her a new gun. How many do you have yourself?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2019
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  6. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    I would pattern that 20ga out at 35 yds and see what it does with some of the new specialty Turkey loads.
     
  7. david58

    david58 Member

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    Thanks for the info re Carlson's choke installation. Had no idea that was available so reasonably - no way will I find a barrel in the condition she has for $135. I can talk all day about traditional muzzleloaders, but what I know about shotgunning would fit in a shot cup.

    May talk myself into an 1100 20 ga, with the cost of choke installation being so cheap. I can take a day of ML shooting, pace is slow and total shots usually low, but a day at the shotgun range might not treat me well if I am standing behind a pump. Given the choice, if I can avoid the surgery via a soft-recoiling auto, I'd rather spend my money that way.
     
  8. david58

    david58 Member

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    Well, from what I can tell, the number of barrels that are in 98% blue to match with the condition of my wife's 1100 are few and far between. And far more expensive than getting choke tubes installed (the recommendation I plan to take action on).
    No need for me to be a hero if the choke tube installation does the trick (she is in charge of the books, and is going to prefer the choke tubes). As to "how many do I have myself?", about as many as she does. "WE" buy guns far more regularly than "I" buy guns.
     
  9. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    Good response. I have never paid more than $125 for a good 1100 barrel, but haven't found someone to do installation for that. I'd love to get rid of my quiver of barrels and get a nice ribbed, tubed barrel, but.....
    I salute your ethics.
     
  10. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    Mike Orlen will install choke tubes cheaper than Carlson's, and I will vouch for his work. That is by FAR the best solution for a standard weight 20 gauge 1100. For yourself, look at an LT20 1100, or a 20 gauge 11-87 if you want 3" capability. I bought one way back when you didn't have to shoot steel in 20 gauge, and it has served admirably in many roles ever since. With the addition of a 2-3/4" barrel with choke tubes installed by Mike Orlen it is my go to gun for anything but waterfowl, including clays.
     
  11. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    I’ll vouch for Mike Orlen too.

    I’m 60 with 3 shoulder operations. Of the semi-auto 20 gauges I own, have owned or shot, the lightest felt recoil for me is Winchester SX3/Browning Silver(the same shotgun internally), and Remington 1100/1187. No longer in production: Browning A5(friction rings set up correctly) and Browning B-80/Beretta 303. The B-80 is the softest I’ve ever shot. With weight being the easiest way to soften recoil, I tend to buy heavier shotguns and deal with the trade-off as best I can. My turkey shotgun is a Weatherby SA-459 Turkey 20 gauge semi. Since the most I’d ever shoot at one sitting is maybe(a big maybe) two or three shells I can handle the lighter weight. It definitely recoils less than a pump, stack barrel or inertia semi though.
    bIt88el.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2019
    Cvans likes this.
  12. Cvans

    Cvans Member

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    It would definitely be a 20 semi-auto if I had your issues.
     
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