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Crane lock or detent modification?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Sam1911, Sep 1, 2008.

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  1. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Hi!

    I'm perusing gunsmithing sites for information on getting some work done on my 629.

    I see references to a crane lock modification and some other things that sound similar.

    Can someone describe this type of modification, what exactly is done to the gun, and how it helps?

    Many thanks!

    -Sam
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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  3. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Thanks!

    That makes some sense, though how tight can the lockup become simply through the addition of a spring-loaded ball? Obviously this can be overpowered by fairly minor pressure, or am I missing the point?


    -Sam
     
  4. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    The original Smith and Wesson "Triple Lock" for all the ballyhoo did nothing for the gun -- for a simple reason. The detent was mounted in the frame and entered the crane extention, so the spring was pressing it backward. Under recoil, the detent became an object at rest, and unlocked.

    The more modern versions have the detent (usually a ball) in the crane, entering the frame. When the gun recoils, the detent is pushed deeper into the recess and locks tighter.
     
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