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Dan Wesson cylinder work.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Demitrios, Jun 28, 2010.

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  1. Demitrios

    Demitrios Member

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    So lately I've been thinking about carrying a back up gun, but rather than buy a new one I would rather carry one that I've grown accustomed to and trust, my Dan Wesson. I can get a smaller barrel and a small pistol grip but what I've been thinking about doing a little custom work and wanted to know what you guys thought about it or if it could even be done safely.

    A normal cylinder that holds six rounds looks roughly like this.
    RevolverCylinder1.jpg

    However I was kicking around the idea of buying another cylinder and making it look dimensionally something like this. Of course with the edges smoothed out a bit.
    RevolverCylinder2.jpg

    Having a flat cylinder would be comfortable while carrying but what I'm concerned with is would the integrity of the cylinder be severely compromised. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    Oh and to anyone who says, "If the gun was meant to be that way it would've been made that way." or "Why mess with something that already works?" or something to that effect the reason is simple. I like tinkering with things and have time and money to play around with.
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I don't think she's going to index and lock up so hot with the locking bolt notches milled off.

    rc
     
  3. sonier

    sonier Member

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    how would the bottom lock engage it would seem to be a very rough action. The intergity would be compromize a bit but if it was 38 special or such loads you should be fine, im just wondering hwo to get the cylinder bottom lock to engage properly.
     
  4. Demitrios

    Demitrios Member

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    The locking bolt notches are directly outside of where the rounds sit in the cylinder, I'd be flattening it down in between the notches. Plus the amount I'd take off along with the depth of the notches shouldn't really present a problem in terms of lock-up and timing.
     
  5. DWFan

    DWFan Member

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    Look at your cylinder carefully. Where the "thin" area is isolated directly above the chamber at the locking notch, you'll now have spread that "weak zone" over a larger area; I'm estimating as much as 60 degrees above each chamber. You're also looking at introducing an "edge" that could lock the cylinder up against the bolt stop, increasing force on the hand, should the stop become dirty or rough.
     
  6. Demitrios

    Demitrios Member

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    Yeah, I never considered that. . . I've seen a few pictures of the Chiappa Rhino and this is what has me tinkering around with the idea of doing this.
     
  7. Nomad

    Nomad Member

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    I don't think it can be done but consider if it could, the cost to do the work would likely be more than buying a small frame revolver.
     
  8. unspellable

    unspellable Member

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    You didn't say what frame or caliber you have. But I suspect that shape is going to give you grief with the action before you get around to worrying about pressure. On my large frame DW's the notch is not centered on the chamber but offset.
     
  9. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    My old DW 15VH in 357 has the bolt notch at the holes, not offset.

    Intriguing. But if I did it it would be a "just because". :) Nice conversation piece. I bet no else has one. And I would probably fire 38Spl+P.
     
  10. Demitrios

    Demitrios Member

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    Mine is the 15-2 with the VH barrel.
     
  11. warnerwh

    warnerwh Member

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    The best place to ask is at: danwessonforums.com
    There's one member who does make a few parts for Dan Wesson revolvers. He will know the best way to do this. His service is excellent.
     
  12. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    They don't make DW revolvers any more. Why don't you experiment on a Taurus first to see how it works?

    That wasn't meant to be a Taurus bashing statement, just an option for a more replaceable gun to play with.
     
  13. Kernel

    Kernel Member

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    Take a look at the profile of Ruger's LCR cylinder. Something like that might work. Though, it wouldn't be a cost effective project.
     
  14. rmfnla

    rmfnla Member

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    LOL!
     
  15. wheelgunslinger

    wheelgunslinger Member

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    Yeah, do it to a dummy gun like a Rossi or Taurus first. Get a prototype the works and then repeat the process on the DW after you work out the bugs.

    A back up gun is not, in my opinion, a place to be artsy and expressive. It's a weapon that has to work no matter what and yields ultimately to function.
     
  16. Demitrios

    Demitrios Member

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