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Database of CLEOs who won't sign off on NFA paperwork?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by natedog, Jul 8, 2005.

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  1. natedog

    natedog Member

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    Has anyone compiled a list or database of CLEOs who won't sign off on Title II paperwork? I'd like to find something of the sort, so that I can factor that in my search for a new home.
     
  2. harvester of sorrow

    harvester of sorrow Member

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    I've never seen any kind of database like that. I would say that the easiest thing to do would be to look at the laws regarding incorporation for the states you might settle in. They might be out there, but I've never heard of a state where the process was so expensive and difficult as to be restrictive, and then it doesn't matter who the CLEO is.
     
  3. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA Member

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    With the turn over rate of the CLEO's a list wouldn't be worth squat 5 minutes after its compiled.
     
  4. Henry Bowman

    Henry Bowman Senior Member

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    Harvester: You don't have to form a corporation (or LLC) in the state in which you reside. Delaware is one of the most popular for businesses because the laws are corporation-friendly and tax laws favorable. NV is also cheap and eazy. I would recomment NV if you are doing only for owning NFA items. Cheaper, very private, and you don't need to advantage of the other laws of DE.
     
  5. harvester of sorrow

    harvester of sorrow Member

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    Henry Bowman, excellent point. I've got a TX corp, but NV makes sense. Something to think about, natedog.
     
  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Regardless of state laws allowing NFA item ownership, some CLEO's simply will not sign. True, incorporation is one way around that, but BATFE has been a bit skeptical on "corporations". The fact is that the CLEO is not "giving permission" to own the gun; the statement says only that no law exists in that jurisdiction to prevent ownership. But anti-gun CLEO's know that BATFE will not OK the transfer without the signature, so they punish would-be owners by refusing to sign.

    Are there ways around that? Some prospective buyers hire an attorney to point out just what is and what is not being attested to; with some CLEO's the prospect of being sued outweighs their reluctance. Others bribe the CLEO, and for some CLEO's this has become a nice source of income, amounting to thousands of dollars a year. Another way, where the CLEO is elected, is to sound out candidates for the office and support one who has no problem with NFA items.

    Jim
     
  7. CleverNickname

    CleverNickname Member

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    1. You'd still need to get someone to be your registered agent in the state you incorporated in.

    2. Are you sure that it's even possible to use out-of-state corporations for title II? I think a corporation being incorporated in a certain state would mean that any transfers to that corporation would have to be done through an SOT in that state or directly from another resident or corporation in that state. IE, if you had a Nevada corporation, but lived in Ohio, you'd have to do all transfers with dealers in Nevada, not dealers in Ohio. Also if that's the case, when you fill out a 4473 you're filling it out as an individual, not as a corporate officer, even for corporate-registered title II firearms. So if the previously mentioned Ohio resident went to Nevada to pick up a gun from a dealer for his Nevada corporation, he couldn't legally do a 4473 from the dealer because he's not a resident of the same state.

    I'm probably wrong somewhere, so if I am please point it out. It's all moot to me, LLCs are easy to set up and cheap here in Texas.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2005
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