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Descendants of Civil War Veterans

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by NIGHTWATCH, Jul 30, 2005.

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  1. NIGHTWATCH

    NIGHTWATCH Member

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    Is there anybody here who is a descendant of a civil war veteran? Do you have pictures? Can you tell us a little about them and what arms they may have past down?

    Thanks ;)
     
  2. Barbara

    Barbara Member

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    [​IMG]

    This is one of them, Charles Collins Gavin, joined up in Butler County, Ohio, and eventually made his way to Vermilion County, Illinois.

    The other was Isaac Wilson Day, born in Coshocton County, Ohio, and then moved to Vermilion County, Illinois after the war. His brother died in Libby Prison, according to his father's obituary.

    Dunno what either of them shot, though, sorry.

    This story mentions Wilson's uncle Barney, who was an indian scout and crack shot and wounded at Beecher Island:
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~nalakota/wotw/military/forsyth_wotw022936.htm
    Barney, sadly, died in a gun battle in Grand County, Colorado July 4, 1883.

    Another brother, Lew, was killed by the Nez Perce in Idaho.
    Another brother, Benjamin also served in the War, and ended up serving as the president of the Washington Territory Senate.

    Various other cousins served and/or died in the Civil War. None of them left me any guns, though, darn it.
     
  3. Sylvilagus Aquaticus

    Sylvilagus Aquaticus Member

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    My great-great grandfather was 2nd. Lt. in a Texas cavalry unit (dismounted). I have a photo of him later in life, but all earlier likenesses of him were destroyed in a fire about 9 years ago. The resemblance is eerie. He's heavier than I am, but the face is the same. The photograph was taken of him at about age 55 to 60. I'm 46, and everyone who has seen it remarks on how uncanny it is. My father and I were both named for him. I have information that a firearm he carried during the war is in posession of one of my very distant cousins in Oklahoma. I assume it is likely a shotgun as that was one of the most common arms that (local) dismounted cavalry used at the time. My research indicates that they mostly fought with personal weapons. I plan to track down the firearm and negotiate for its purchase.

    His unit (Co. F, 19th Texas Cavalry, D.) was organized in Cherokee County, Texas in 1861 and was later combined with 3 other units after Arkansas Post.
    2nd. Lt. was an elected position in Texas cavalry units. The junior officers were elected by the men. It was not uncommon for some Texas cavalry units to ride to a battle area, dismount, and fight as infantry unless the horses were sent home during a campaign. He was present at Arkansas Post and at Mansfield, Louisiana during the Red River campaign. Evidence suggests a link to his presence at the Chicamauga campaign as well.

    He was born in eastern Tennessee around Tracy City in 1834, moved to east Texas with his brother and other family members in 1855, and died in 1906. I have copies of some of his papers and his will.

    Regards,
    Rabbit.
     
  4. Barbara

    Barbara Member

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    If anyone would like help digging into this stuff, I'm pretty good.
     
  5. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    My great-grandfather, William W. Humphrey, served as a private in Co. F, 148th Reg. Illinois Infantry. He enrolled the 11 day of Feb. 1865, to serve one year. Discharged the 5th day of Sept. 1865, by reason of muster out of company.

    My Mother's Grandfather, John Francis Clooney, was drafted (he was working as a shipyard carpenter, and came to Texas. He settled in Lake Charles, Louisiana, and was quite prominent there. When he died, his friends, all Confederate veterans, thought his wartime service should be honored, but thought that some thoughtless person might vandalize a Union Army tombstone. So he has a Confederate veteran's headstone.
     
  6. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher Member

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    On my Mother's side, my great grandfather, and his 9 brothers all served with Robert E. Lee. On my Dad's side, my great grandfather was with Pierre Beauregard's South Carolina Militia, when they took Fort Sumter.
    My Cousin still has my Great Grandfather's sword, his Merwn Hulbert revolver, and his British rifle.
     
  7. WT

    WT Member

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    One relative served with Co. H., 1st Alabama Cav (US). Sort of Force Recon for General Sherman.

    He didn't pass down any weapons but the silver service he confiscated as contraband from a Georgia plantation is in my sister's possession.
     
  8. Bacon

    Bacon Member

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    My Great-Grandfather was a volunteer in the 58th Alabama Infantry. Served in Tennessee at battles of Cickamauga, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge. Captured at Missionary Ridge and sent to Rock Island Prison for 16 months. Survived Rock Island Prison and was released after the war. My Father says he was never the same after the experience in prison.

    He had 3 brothers that all served in Alabama units. One was killed at Okolona, Mississippi.

    There is also a bunch from Tennessee that served. But I think that is enough for now.
     
  9. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    I am descended from several veterans of the Late War (seven of my eight great great grandfathers), all of them former Confederates. I have said before that my ancestors seem to have been the only privates in the entire Confederacy, as everyone else's ancestors are rported to have been at least captains 8^).

    None of them left very much at all, being relatively poor farmers- in working on my genealogy I have copied several of their wills. Also very useful were Confederate pension records- note that Confederate pensioners were paid by the states which they served, and the states still maintain the records. The pension applications are often treasuries of useful information.

    None of my wartime ancestors left any weapons behind that are known to me presently. No known pictures of any of them have survived either. As I said, they were all farmers without a lot of money to spare. As one example, the 1850 census for Perry County, AL lists the family of then 16-year-old Benjamin Franklin Garrison as having property worth $400. ( http://www.rootsweb.com/~cenfiles/al/perry/1850/pg0349b.txt )

    He served in Co. K, 8th Alabama Infantry ( http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Lair/3680/cw/cw-al.html ), was wounded and discharged early in the war and returned home. He is listed in the census of surviving veterans taken in 1907 ( http://www.rootsweb.com/~alperry/a-l-1907.htm ).

    My grandfather knew him as a child, and described him to me as a gentle man, crippled in one arm due to his wound.

    Genealogy is an entertaining pursuit, made much easier by resources available on the web- thirty years ago when i was doing all this for the first time it required mostly locating and then traveling to see the original paper records, save for censuses on microfilm.

    lpl/nc
     
  10. Hobie

    Hobie Member

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    2, no pics available for posting (at the moment). 9th NY Heavy Artillery and 134th NY Infantry. Father and son, both wounded, both disabled, both lived into the 20th Century (1909 and 1928 respectively). The son was at Lookout Mountain... ;) and Gettysburg (where he was wounded on July 1 at the brickyard).

    I am the secretary for the 116th Infantry Regiment "The Stonewall Brigade" Foundation and get quite a few research requests. You can find me e-mail addy for that business on the web site.
     
  11. enfield

    enfield Member

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    Not a descendant of anyone in that particular war, but my great uncle won the Medal of Honor at a little skirmish called Carter's Farm in Virginia. He named his son (my first cousin, once removed) General Grant. Cool, huh?

    There have been a LOT of soldiers in my family, dating back to the French & Indian war. Seems to be the family trade - 4 brothers and myself are vets - 3 Army and 2 Navy.
     
  12. cxm

    cxm Member

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    The War

    My great-grandfather and great-great grandfather served in the War of Northern Agression.

    Great grandfather mustered into the 8th Mississippi in Jackson. Fought at Corinth, Pittsburg Landing, Oxford, Vicksburg(caputred), Chickamauga Creek and Kennesaw Mountain. He ended the war in North Carolina with the Army of Tennessee under Uncle Joe. He started as a private and ended the war as the 1st. Sergent.

    I still have his Tower Musket dated 1863 (assume it was acquired after capture at Vicksburg.)

    Great-great grandfather was a surgeon in the 1st. Mississippi, and was noted for his speed in removing limbs.. a talent of some little value back then.

    FWIW

    Chuck
     
  13. sumpnz

    sumpnz Member

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    I don't know if they are in fact relatives, but what with the surname Upson being fairly uncommon I imagine there's a link somewhere. In the Ken Burns Civil War Documentary they used a couple exerpts from the diary of Theodore F Upson (one from before he joined up/was drafted, and one from his combat journal), and Google turns up a Capt Andrew Upson of the 20th Connecticut Volunteers (he was captured by W.S. Bledsoe of the 4th Tennessee Cavalry in early 1864).

    On a side note, the first Upson in America was Thomas Upson VI who arrived in 1621, and my great^8 grandfather was William White, 11th signer of the Mayflower pact. Sometime in the 17th or 18th century the Upson family in America line split with 2 brothers named Peregrine and Resolved. I'm decended from the Resolved line.
     
  14. myrockfight

    myrockfight Member

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    Yup, but...

    Yes. I know I do. My Aunt has all the information. As well as the information regarding to ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War. I have been meaning to catch up on all that stuff with her, but I have only seen her once in the past year and a half.

    Good thread though. Now I am going to have to collect all the information for sure!! :D

    I forgot to add an interesting tidbit. One of my friends I met at Western Kentucky University is Robert E. Lee's great-great-granddaughter. I always thought that was the coolest thing, but I never get the opportunity to bring it up!
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2005
  15. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Descendents of soldiers who served the Union are eligible for membership in the SUV, Sons of Union Veterans.

    Descendents of soldiers who served the Confederacy are eligible for membership in the SCV, Sons of Confederate Veterans.

    Descendents who can trace ancestors to veterans on both sides may join both the SUV and SCV and are jokingly called SOBs, Sons of Both. :eek:

    Folks like myself who have no ancestors who fought in the war are SONs, Sons of neither. O.K., I just made this one up. :neener:
     
  16. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    BTW, for those of you who have ancestors who served the Union, you may be able to get a reprint of the regimental history. Go to Higginson Books Look for the state and regiment #. They can be pricey, but often times they're the only game in town. I've three shelves filled with their books and more on the way. They also have a very small selection of Corn-fed books.

    If you can't make it to the National Archives, you can contact them and ask them to dig out the Service Record (if available) or Pension file (if an application was filed). I use a private researcher as she's faster. Rollcallresearch@aol.com
     
  17. thorn726

    thorn726 Member

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    interesting stuff guys and -
    wow, what a cool piece of history.

    so far not many Yanks huh ?

    i dont think Quakers fought much, they were the half of my ancestors that were here then.
    (my dad's side was still in Europe)
     
  18. Feanaro

    Feanaro Member

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    We aren't too sure but I believe my grandfather of too many times to remember, Eli Manuel Hogan, served and died in the Civil War. He was about 40, not too old to fight. He was in the 1860 census but not in the 1870. There is no grave in this state to an Eli or E Hogan, nor any other records to that effect. And he appears to be on a muster roll for the Jefferson County area. Trouble is, the first name is listed as "E." rather than "Eli". There is no other known Exxx Hogan from the area but there is still some doubt.

    Interesting story. One of my nth great-grandfathers refused to fight for the Confederacy. And so, my nth great-grandmother cut his head off with an ax. :what: No charges pressed, as I remember it. All of the men in the family after that were good and devoted Southerners. :evil:
     
  19. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    One of my great grand fathers served in the civil war (on the wrong side, I am sad now to say). He was from Illinois. My grandmother still had his union uniform, and I assume my mother has it now.

    More proudly, one of my Scot ancestors fought in the American Revolution. Interestingly enough, that branch of the family left Pennsylvania for Texas in the early 1860s - I often wonder if they were trying to avoid the coming storm, as I know of no civil war veterans among them.

    Sorry, but I just don't feel comfortable mentioning names on the internet.
     
  20. 71Commander

    71Commander Member

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    My great-great Grandaddy fought for the CSA. We're from northeastern Tennessee. I saw a photo of him once with my Great-great Grandmother. He was in uniform. Has no visible rank or insiginas. He was just a mountain boy and dirt farmer before and after the war. He never left the mountains. Got a ton of kin folk down home, and in two years, there will be two more. My wife and me. :D
     
  21. BTR

    BTR Member

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    My great-great grandfather, Squirrelly Bill, was in the first Tennessee, and fought in several major battles, including first and second Bull Run and Gettysburg. He supposedly participated in Pickett's Charge. Another great-grandfather was in Forest's calvery... To round it out, two of my ancestors were murdered for refusing to join the confederate military... one apparently by the KKK, after the war.
     
  22. 49hudson

    49hudson Member

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    Had one Great-Great Grindfather who was a yankee from pa..
    Two Great Grandfathers who were confederates from North Carolina.
    All were privates.
    One GreatGrandfather was shot by a yankee minie ball that went through his left elbow. went through his coat, shirt and eblow and rolled down his sleeve and fell at his feet. He picked it up and put it in his pocket. I think one of my Couisins has this.
    The other confederate Great Grandfather was a distiller of peach brandy.
    He was wounded, but the officer wouldn't sign his discharge until he sent home for a ten gallon keg of brandy.
     
  23. oweno

    oweno Member

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    Have ancestors that fought for both. Irish and French Canadian immigrants...Hey, sign up and get the bounty, the war will only last for a few months and then you'll have enough money to buy your own farm.

    For one of the Confederates, he was actually able to buy a farm after the war. One of the Union ancestors, though, never came home. As they say on memorial tombstones (cenotaphs, I think), "Resting in Southern Fields"
     
  24. Scoupe

    Scoupe Member

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    About 5 Civil war vets in our family, maybe more. Three of them with my last name:
    Aaron - 151st Regiment, Indiana Infantry
    Matthias - 19th Regiment, Ohio Infantry and also shown as 32nd Regiment, Ohio Infantry - Probably served in Tennessee
    Richard - 26th Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery

    Our people come from Western Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, so most were yankees. One notable exception would be Henry A. Wise of Virginia.

    Also have at least one War of 1812 vet, a couple families involved in the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion.

    Four Revolutionay vets. Frederich Donley (sometimes Dambach), Adam, and Jacob Tombaugh. All of York County, PA. Family tradition has Jacob at Valley Forge, but that is undocumented. George Tompoh is shown on rosters of Cpt. Jame's Craven's 5th Battalion Washington County Milita during the Revolution, then on George Meer's compnay and finally as a member of Stockley's Rangers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2005
  25. NIGHTWATCH

    NIGHTWATCH Member

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    I was watching the documentary by Ken Burns last night and wondered if any here had ties. This is awesome guys, thanks.
     
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