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Detent Lock on Revolver

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by GeneC, Jun 4, 2004.

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  1. GeneC

    GeneC member

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    I read where I could drill a hole in the yoke and put a ball bearing in there and then drill another hole in the frame where the bearing comes to rest when cylinder is closed and have some questions. What'd be the pros/cons to this? How does this work? Wouldn't the ball bearing need a little spring beneath it? How hard is this to do right?
     
  2. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    You will find them in Brownells catalog, like so many other things. I believe they were first used on Smith & Wesson revolvers by custom gunsmiths that eliminated the lock-up at the front of the ejector rod when they installed bull barrels for PPC shooters. Yes, you do have to have a small coil spring under the ball or detent. Since the holes in the frame and yoke have to line up a drill fixture should be used. I would say this is a job for a professional gunsmith that has the right tools and fixtures to do the job right. Taurus is using this system on some of their snubbies so that they can use a longer ejector rod - which is a good idea. While they are not a true mechanical yoke lock - as used by Ruger for example, they do serve a good purpose on revolvers that do not lock at the yoke or at the end of the ejector rod.
     
  3. GeneC

    GeneC member

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    Thankyou sir, you're an endless source of good info. Well, since my S&W 66 has an ejector rod lock up, I probably don't need that, just curious.
     
  4. cleve land

    cleve land Member

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    Also, when used with the front lock-up creats a triple lock. I have used one on a S&W Model 13 for 25 years-the gun still locks up tight.
     
  5. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    It works OK but it is not as good as the normal front lock; it may be necessary under the circumstances indicated, but I prefer the front lock, and as long as it is there, I don't think adding the crane lock serves any purpose.

    S&W dropped its original third lock on the "Triple Lock" because it was costly and complicated and seemed to not be needed or serve any real purpose. Writers who praise the "Triple Lock" (the ones that is who have actually seen one) are usually impressed by the workmanship but never seem to be able to explain the advantage of the third lock.

    Jim
     
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