Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

digital copy of reloading books

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Mike 27, Nov 20, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mike 27

    Mike 27 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    454
    Location:
    Alaska, Fort Wainwright
    I have been looking around and trying to find a digital copy of reloading manuals. Seems so much easier to keep them on a digital device (iPad in my case). Anyone find or use anything like this?
     
  2. JLDickmon

    JLDickmon Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2012
    Messages:
    665
    Location:
    Comstock, MI
    so much of it is copyrighted information, I'd think your only source would be Lyman or Hodgdon, Alliant, Sierra and Nosler.
     
  3. splattergun

    splattergun Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,687
    Location:
    Utah
    Older versions of ABCs of Reloading are available free to downoload as PDF from various sources. My copy is the '94 version. ABCs is also available at Amazon in Kindle section, as are several others. However, I've not seen the 'major' reloading manuals from bullet or powder producers in Kindle... yet.
     
  4. Mike 27

    Mike 27 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    454
    Location:
    Alaska, Fort Wainwright
    I pulled down the alliant PDF version. I am not the most technology savy guy out there but the wife bought me an IPad and it really handy for keeping the books on. Would be nice if Lyman and Hornady would put the books out on there.
     
  5. italian biker

    italian biker Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    Perrysburg, Ohio
    I'd pay for a digital download of them throw them on the laptop, then have the pages open that I need on the laptop.
     
  6. briang7511

    briang7511 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    south east michigan
    technology is great but i think everyone has learned from the music sharing. you can find alot of data on all powder manufacturers web site. i dont quite understand why bullet manufacturers charge for load data books but powder companys give it a way for free.
     
  7. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,106
    Location:
    South Texas
    There are no "reloading instructions" from downloaded powder manufacturer data. Data is limited to that powder and 'some' bullets. There is no "why" information, just raw data.
    It's fine for experienced reloaders for comparison with other data and experience.
     
  8. Mike 27

    Mike 27 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    454
    Location:
    Alaska, Fort Wainwright
    Not looking for free stuff, I just have a stack of paper books. I looked at Kindle, nook and the itunes books to see if any of the major published books were available, and no luck. Figured if anyone would have had any luck with this it would be here. Thanks for the responses.

    Mike
     
  9. upstech76

    upstech76 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    I have been thinking about scanning my Lyman manual for my own personal use just havent done it yet. I did find out that Office Depot & Office Max has a cutter that will cut the spine off the book cleanly, and I have access to a large scanner/copier/printer that will scan both sides of the page and can do the whole book in maybe a minute. Being copywrited data I can't share it but its perfectly legal to do for personal use.
     
  10. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2009
    Messages:
    4,570
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    Realistically the gun industry as a whole often lags behind the rest of a world a bit in technology. I'd wager than in another 3-5 years there will be at least a few reloading manuals available on the Kindle store or other e-book service. To me it just makes a lot more sense to have a digitally searchable database of text.

    Unfortunately too that aspect (text searching) will also not carry over if you decide to scan yourself, unless you use some sort of OCR software (which I'd be leery of using with reloading data - the first time the software interprets a 1 as a 7 you might be in for some trouble . . .).
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page