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Disappointed (big time)

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by edggy, May 18, 2006.

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  1. edggy

    edggy Member

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    My Walker revolver finally had come in. I was like a little kid getting a Christmas present. Well the sky fell, when I couldn't cock it or turn the
    cylinder. I couldnt even think straight so I had someone drive me to the UPS
    place to return it. Once again Iam waiting for a replacement. Iam feeling
    better as I write this. Any similar experiences
     
  2. Steve499

    Steve499 Member

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    Who made it?

    Steve
     
  3. Tight_Wad

    Tight_Wad Member

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    Yeah, I had a perfectly good Euroarms Rogers & Spencer .44 revolver that worked fine but I decided to trade up - or so I thought. I bought the $1000 Pedersoli Match version but it came with an incorrectly indexed barrel which canted the front sight over and sent the shot well off the paper to the left. And it came with a bent trigger bolt screw too. The faults were put right by the seller but these things can happen on all guns of all makes no matter how much you pay. It's very disheartening but persevere and you'll get there in the end.
    The Pedersoli now shoots better than I can aim it!

    Tight Wad :cuss:
     
  4. edggy

    edggy Member

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    Uberti

    Steve, It was a Uberti I bought it from Midway.
     
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    edggy:

    I understand your disapointment, but the problem might have simply been that the barrel wedge was driven in too far, causing the barrel to bind the cylinder. Otherwise it's likely that the hammer isn't picking up the cylinder bolt and unlocking the cylinder so that it can turn, which also freezes the hammer. Both of these problems are easy to fix, and well known to regular black powder revolver shooters. Anyway, I'm sure Midway will replace it, and I hope you have better luck next time. But expect the internal lockwork to be packed with shipping grease. They wipe off the outside sometimes, but do nothing about the insides.
     
  6. edggy

    edggy Member

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    the cylinder was hitting the bottom of the frame.
     
  7. sundance44s

    sundance44s Member

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    sundance44s

    This is why i always say a new B/P shooter would be better off ( if he or she has the bucks ) make the first one a Ruger ... the Italian models will make a gun smith out of ya quick ! or send ya over the edge ..and take up roller skateing . Hope i live long enough to see an American co . make a 1858 Remington copy .. i`d eat beans to get one !
     
  8. edggy

    edggy Member

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    Yes) If my replacement is anything like the first one Yes I will get my money back and save up for a ruger that I hear so much about. ( But darn it. I sure like the looks of a Walker)
     
  9. Smokin_Gun

    Smokin_Gun Member

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    Was probly one that was made on a bad day... Haven't heard of too many people gettin a bad Walker, but as I can see it happens. Midway will take care of you and if you talk to the order desk ask them to hand check it. It can't hurt. I bet the next one you get will be a keeper. All that bad day stuff will vanish. Good luck...
     
  10. sundance44s

    sundance44s Member

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    sundance44s

    Thats true ..after the first shot .. you`ll have a smile a mile long . :D
     
  11. Gewehr98

    Gewehr98 Member

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    Yeah, but...

    How long has Ruger been making Colt Walker replicas?

    I'd buy a Ruger Old Army, too, if I was looking for a Ruger. But I'm partial to my '58 Remington .44, and will have a Walker or Dragoon someday. The Ruger is nice, but doesn't quite fit in the scheme of things when one's got their heart set on an old Colt BP revolver replica, sans topstrap and all... ;)
     
  12. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    Gewehr,

    How long has Ruger been making ANYTHING that looks like an authentic Colt or Rem BP revolver. They are super strong. They just DO NOT look good to me.

    I prefer the Colts, like immensely the Rems, do NOT like the look of the Ruger, no matter if I could outdo a full bore 44 mag with it. Still not anything like a real BP revolver, or pistol, if I screwed up by calling it a revolver. It is a revolving pistol.

    Think I am with you on this subject. The Ruger is not a BP replica, it is an attempt to outdo the BP repros, but an ugly attempt.

    Still say I would not have one, just for aesthetics.

    Cheers,

    George
     
  13. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    SAMPLING!

    I think that you should treat guns like wine ( expert talk - wine not guns!). You have to try before you buy :evil: You shouldn't buy a bottle just because it has a fancy label, you need to know if the liquid is worth the money :rolleyes: and to your taste!
    Same with a gun. What looks awkward in the box might just be the mutznutz for you to shoot. Sure, look at books and ask questions but get your sticky little hands on as many as you can and see what they feel like. Check out a local club perhaps and see if you can fire a few - who knows, you might surprise yourself!!
    I would think that BP shooters are as friendly in the flesh as they are on this forum.
    Duncan
     
  14. Low Key

    Low Key Member

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    You can get a dud with any manufacturer, but from what I've heard most companies will exchange a dud for another gun to satisfy the customer...cabela's has excellenct customer service. I've got three pietta 58 Remingtons and they are all good ones. I've smoothed the actions on them and none of them needed any major gunsmithing to make them fine weapons. Most of my tinkering has actually been in customizing my guns to my liking and not fixing function problems. Maybe the pietta's were worse before 1999, but they got some new machinery and made major improvements to the overall quality of their products. I'd like to aquire a Ruger Old Army at some point, but for now I'm happy with the 58's I have so maybe next year I'll get the ROA.
     
  15. Boom-stick

    Boom-stick Member

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    I disagree with Duncan, I always buy my wine buy what the bottle or label looks like:)
     
  16. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    THATS A LONDON THING!!

    Good job too BS, someone has to buy the rubbish :evil: :evil: Anyway, we don't let the good stuff out very often - save it all for ourselves :D :D :D And we don't pay silly prices for it either - that's reserved for Black Powder!
    Duncan
     
  17. RecoilRob

    RecoilRob Member

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    Considering the weight of the Walker and the cavalier manner that the UPS folks throw the packages around, it is NOT a surprise that the wedge may have been driven in harder than when it left the factory.

    My Dragoons suffered the same treatment and would not turn when removed from the boxes. They were not damaged in any way but too tight.

    Breaking them down, cleaning and re-assembling found them good to go. They have VERY tight wedge tolerances and can only barely have the wedges in far enough to have the lock tab protrude from the barrel.

    This is good for long term wear and tear but could easily cause a return from someone who is new to the Colt BP revolvers and doesn't get the big picture.

    Please, when your new Walker arrives.....take it down and clean it BEFORE doing anything else. Put it together gently and only drive the wedge in as far as the cylinder will turn. It won't be very far on a brand new gun.
     
  18. edggy

    edggy Member

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    ThankYou Recoil Rob, Ive never had a Blackpowder Revolver and wanted
    one and Ive always like the walker. I guess to much old movies. I only wish
    the man I talked to would have told me the same thing.
     
  19. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    edggy:

    While you are waiting for your replacement revolver to arrive, use this forum's search feature and the key words "black powder" and "colt" to find past threads on your favorite cap & ball blaster. These will provide you with a lot of free education and knowledge. Also try the key word "walker."
     
  20. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    Duncan,

    I might be heretical, but I buy my wine in the 5 litre cardboard carton, with the mylar bag inside. I know it can't be as good as the stuff with the punt bottom to the bottle, and a bottle so hard a smack with a ball pien hammer won't break it, but I can't really tell the difference.

    I don't have dead taste buds, just that some wines appeal to me, some don't. I like a good (to me ) Burgundy. I even like a good Merlot. I can, and do, drink some whites and some Roses. I don't like a sweet wine as much as one that has some bite to it.

    I like where some have bought 1800's wines, for fantastic sums, and don't know till they open it whether they have bought a superb elixir or an old bottle of vinegar.

    Do they use sulfites routinely, over there, either to clean the bottles or to prevent the wine from going bad in the bottle? Would seem it also keeps the wine from improving with age. Kills it, ie.

    Jeez, the original poster, the Walker buyer, I hope he knows the Walker's wedge is reversed from all the others. You gotta push it out left to right, not like the rest that are right to left, looking down.

    Cheers,

    George
     
  21. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    Well lets put it like this George, if you like it - drink it - enjoy it, but don't complain about a bad head in the morning. I was out last night at a French meal to celibrate the end of term for the local adult education courses. Finished eating at about 1 am! This morning I am wearing a lead beret as the locals say ( hangover )
    As to the use of sulpher in winemaking, yes it is normally added while the wine is in the tanks, before it is either bottled or put into casks to age. They use the absolute minimum to stop primary fermentation bugs but it does not stop the wine from developing. Wine needs to breath to improve hence the use of corks. If you use screw caps or foil bags in boxes then that developement is stopped. No point in saving it so enjoy it instead.
    I opened a bottle of Minervois last week that has been in the wine store for 3 years. It was BEAUTIFUL! The first bottle of this wine we opened just after we bought it and it was very bland so this proves the point - it improves with age. Secret is knowing how long to lay it down for! Thei cost us about $2.95 a bottle.
    As Keith Ffloyd says, " If it's not good enough to drink, it's not good enough to cook with!"
    Duncan
     
  22. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I don't drink much wine. I like beer. Must be my hun heritage. Guess that's why I have such poor tastes in BP revolvers, what with the Ruger and all. LOL I had a Colt Navy replica and never warmed to the topless look. That topless look with that octagon barrel just never did warm to me. I much prefer Remmies for replicas and I like a gun that works. Remmie tend to shoot better and have almost real sights. I want to get a Remmie to play with. They look like a lotta fun. I have one spotted to cull from the herd at Cabelas, just waiting on the money, the ever present quest.

    Guns, especially black powder, are subject to individual preferences, though. Of all the Colts, the rounded barreled '60s/dragoons are my favorite. I like to be able to have an actual USE for my firearms over and above range duty, though. The Ruger is impossible to beat as a shooter and field gun. It packs an almost Walker like punch (gonna get my cylinders bored out) and yet shoots as accurate as a modern cartridge gun. It's built STOUT! It ain't gonna break or wear if you take care of it. UPS could drop it off a ten story building and the Ruger would just keep on keepin' on. It's built on a superblackhawk like frame, could take many times the pressure any black powder or substitute can dish out and it'll just laugh it off. You could build a .44 mag on that frame and it'd be no problem. After stretching that old Navy's brass (I was a broke student and it was cheap) frame into non-compliance, I appreciate a strong revolver. That Ruger is gonna ride on my hip for backup while hog hunting soon as I can get up to east Texas. I wanna get the work done to it first, though. When I get the Remmie, it'll likely be a range queen. But, heck, it's BP! I was kinda thinkin' about getting a cartridge conversion cylinder for it in the future if I like it as a shooter. That could give it some uses it wouldn't otherwise have as a field gun. But, heck, I have a stainless .45 colt blackhawk that puts 'em in under 4moa. I shoot .44 mag level handloads out of that thing. My light load puts a 255 grain cast flat point out the barrel at 950 or so FPS. Why would I wanna tote a Remmie that ain't no more totable? It might be a little more totable than that big ol' Ruger, but in black powder hunting for hogs, I think I'd rather have the power and accuracy of the Ruger, thanks. If I slap a big hog with that Hawkin .50 and it don't slow him down, I have more faith in the Ruger than any other BP revolver on the market. I'd carry my .45 colt blackhawk if it was legal at that particular WMA (Texas public hunting, BP only rules there). But, I like the looks and feel of Remmies and as a range shooter, it should be fun and it's not expensive. I've always wanted a Remmie, anyway.

    I might be a little too practical to be a true black powder aficionado, but hey, I've been shootin' cap an ball for a LONG time, over a quarter century now.
     
  23. sundance44s

    sundance44s Member

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    sundance44s

    Nothing like a bottle of ripple with a splash of moose milk added for that hard to please taste bud . :D
     
  24. edggy

    edggy Member

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    The ups man just brought my new replacement. And its not only Beautiful its flawless.The action is smooth and everything lines up perfect. I'am so very happy with this one. And wouldn't you know it. Now I'am focusing on a drop in cylinder
    to go with it. Thank You
     
  25. Smokin_Gun

    Smokin_Gun Member

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    Congrads Edggy it's always good to see another happy Hog Leg owner...can't wait to hear your range report.
     
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